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30 Sep 2011
Comments: 2

Setting Student Restrictions on an iDevice

It is vital for teachers and iDevice administrators to set up restrictions in the device prior to putting them in the hands of students. If restrictions are not initiated, students can set up their own code for the restrictions and/or will have access to multiple questionable opportunities. When you set up restrictions, use a four-digit code that can be standardized (e.g. the four digit year the campus opened) but not easily guessed (e.g. 1234 or 0000).

Here are a few suggestions for default restrictions:

Enable Student Restrictions

  1. YouTube: Many times this is blocked already by the proxy.
  2. iTunes: This will block the music on the device. It will also turn off of Ping, a social network for music, automatically.
  3. Turn off Allow Installing & Deleting Apps: This will block students signing into their own iTunes account and restrict them from deleting existed apps teachers have synced to the device.
  4. Accounts: Set this option to “Don’t Allow Changes” so students cannot edit or delete existing accounts (e.g. default student email for sending projects to teachers and the MobileMe account).
  5. Turn off in-app purchase: This will block pop-ups carrying you to the app store to purchase additional features within an app.
  6. Adjust content age limits as appropriate. Consider the following settings:
    1. Music & Podcasts: Clean
    2. Movies: PG
    3. TV Shows: PG
    4. Apps: 12+
  7. Turn off multi-player games: This applies to games in the game center.
  8. Turn off adding friends: This also applies to games in the game center.

 

Teaching teachers to regulate these restrictions is an integral piece in managing these iDevices in the classroom.

 

 

 


27 Sep 2011
Comments: 6

Double Your Learning! Double Your Fun!

 

Carnazzos' Class: Two of Everything

Ms. Carnazzosclass is back at it again – integrating the iPad into innovative learning experiences. Thanks to a gracious donation from the app developer of Puppet Pals’s Director’s Pass, her class received a promo code for the full version including all of the characters and backgrounds as well as the ability to create your own characters and backgrounds.

In Math, Ms. Carnazzos’ class read the book “Two of Everything” by Lily Toy Hong. The story describes a magic pot that doubles everything that is put inside it.

Using her class iPad, Ms. Carnazzo achieved the trifecta of integration melding literacy, mathematics, and technology into this wonderfully crafted iLesson.

 

 

Here’s how she did it:

Two of Everything

  1. Students worked in cooperative groups of 4. They decided together what their number sentence would be and what object they would put into the pot. Then they each had to solve and explain their strategy on paper.
  2. Each group met with Ms. Canazzo to solidify their story plot.
  3. After the initial teacher conference, students got to choose their setting and each student chose a character. (This helped the group decide who would have what lines.)
  4. Students practiced their lines on their own and with Ms. Carnazzo a few times. Then they recorded their final show. (This process took 3 or 4 times to get it right due to…. forgotten lines, background noise, voice recording being too soft, trouble moving their character while they spoke right into the mic on the ipad.)
  5. While a small group was recording, the large group worked on math stations or independent work as the room needed to be quiet for recording.

 

Carnazzos' Class: Two of Everything

Additional Notes: The picture of the pot came from a website that housed a bank of teacher lessons. While the students did not complete an official storyboard (just ran through the dialogue a few times), Ms. Carnazzo suggested that it might help with the flow (… though she did prefer the less scripted quality where it sounds like the students are just talking and not reading lines.) “Two of Everything” Extension.

Extensions & Ideas: If you would like to create a lesson like this or need further suggestions for how to integrate Puppet Pals into your classroom (at any grade level and with any content area)… check out this full Puppet Pals iLesson post.

 


26 Sep 2011
Comments: 0

Appy Hours and App Smackdowns

HS Appy Hour: Thank you Carl Hooker, Eanes ISD Director of Instructional Technology (and “iEvangelist from the planet Hookertron”) for sharing your H.S. Appy Hour menu (modeled after the techchef4u menus linked below). Carl added a very cool feature to his menu: open it in iBooks and the app buttons will actually take you to the app store when you can download the app of your choice. I think I will be “borrowing” this feature when I revamp our secondary menus. (Can’t wait for the release of the app smackdown video!). AppyHourMenu9-19-2011_EanesISDpdf

Eanes ISD Appy Hour Menu

Noterize: I fell in love with Noterize (featured in the All Purpose section of the menu) and shared it as part of a my South San ISD iPad Camp. They loved the integration with PDF’s and the multiple classroom implementation possibilities. Stay tuned for an upcoming techchef4u post which will include home-baked recipes for how to integrate PDF’s into your iLesson Toolkit!  

If you devoured the Eanes ISD menu, whet your palette with blod flavor of these appy morsels:

  1. Secondary Math Menu
  2. Secondary Science Menu
  3. Secondary History Menu
  4. Secondary ELAR Menu
  5. Apps for Parents
  6. HOT Apps 4 HOTS
  7. Appy Hours Direct 2 U: Free Delivery

22 Sep 2011
Comments: 0

3 Ways to Manage Student iPads in the Classroom

As the tidal wave of iDevices hit the shores this fall, I felt it was a good time to highlight a few ways to manage these devices with students.
  1. Add a Custom Email Signature: If you have email set up (we have a generic student email on each device that allows outgoing emails and restricts incoming) on the device to submit student work, consider adding a custom signature to your iDevice to discourage/manage rogue emails and inappropriate student use. Giving each device a different traceable signature will make it easier to locate the device that sent an inappropriate email. It is advised that each student uses the same iPad each class (e.g. Johnny is assigned iPad 4 for English Class 3rd period and Janie is assigned iPad 4 for English Class 4th period) to further streamline this process.
    1. Settings
    2. Mail, Contacts, Calendars
    3. Signature
    4. “Sent from Johnson Middle School: tag#****”
  2. Set up MobileMe on your devices to locate and manage stolen or missing iDevices:
    1. Settings
    2. Mail, Contacts, Calendar
    3. Add Account
    4. MobileMe
    5. Enter Apple ID and password
    6. Next to Verify
    7. OK to allow MobileMe to use the Location
    8. Save
    9. Login to me.com on your computer with the Apple ID and password to track devices
    10. From Me.com, you can Display a Message or Play Sound on the missing device (sound will play when device is on or turned back on) as well as Lock or Wipe it.
  3. Add Numbered Backgrounds to your iDevices (find full setup info for iDevices here) to minimize inappropriate student customization and make checking in/out of iDevices smoother:
    1. Launch Safari on the device
    2. Visit http://bit.ly/pgipadwp (you only need to type in bit.ly/pgipadwp
    3. Select the wallpaper you want for that device (you can choose green backgrounds with yellow or blue text and numbers 1-30)
    4. Tap and hold a couple of seconds to save the image
    5. Launch Photo App (sunflower icon)
    6. Select the image you chose in step 3&4
    7. Hit the arrow
    8. Select as Wallpaper
    9. Set it as both lock screen and home screen

 

 


21 Sep 2011
Comments: 2

Chalk it Up to a Learning Experience!:

Came across this a few days ago and actually had a few minutes to play with it this evening. No fancy alliteration this morning – just the facts (and perhaps an idiom)!

 

  1. It is NOT an app – just a website that only works with the iPad.
  2. Type in the url (chalk.37signals.com) in Safari on your device (would recommend creating a webclip – you are going to like this one)
  3. Chalk up your thoughts, create a chalk outline, work out a problem, map out a plot, create a Frayer model or a KWL chart (use 2 dif. colors of chalk and realistic eraser)
  4. Press send arrow box for instructions on how to save your creation (image saves to your photo roll where it can then be emailed)

 



19 Sep 2011
Comments: 2

Middle School Math: Modular Learning

Middle School Math Modules

As a former Middle School Math teacher, I am always eager to check out the latest math apps for secondary. I met Dave Brown, the app developer, through LinkedIn and through a series of conversations, he shared with me the intent of this app and sent a nifty promo code my way to review it. Since I had a three hour drive to the beach and the boys were either napping or tethered to an iPad, I thought it would be a good opportunity to take a few minutes and review the app.

Dave had mentioned that the app will always be a work in progress and they are looking to have 10 modules by Christmas. Currently, the app has 7 modules with instructions and objectives for most of them. Out of the 7, 3 made my favorites list. As with anything app-related, they require users as ourselves to test the apps and provide formative feedback to make changes that will truly benefit the end user… our students. With that said, let me introduce Middle School Math:

 

    1. Pinpoint (Winner): This wins my first place vote. Simple and intuitive. Students choose 1 of 8 animals to graph based on given coordinates. The app will also notifyusers when they miss the mark. While the activity presented a learning objective and step-by-step instructions, I didn’t find them integral to my mastering the activity.
    2. Shape Board (Runner-Up): This is a basic Geo Board with rubber bands. It doesn’t have an info section and I had wished it did because I had some initial issues with the rubber bands (thought I had to pull multiple ones like line segments rather than stretch the first one I pulled.) Once I figured that out, I was golden. App also calculates perimeter and area which is a nice self-check feature. As a teacher, I would create a task-card for this directing students to create certain shapes (e.g. polygon, isosceles triangle, regular hexagon) with varying lengths. All in all, this activity has a lot of possibilities.
    3. Data Magnet (Second Runner-Up): This activity has a lot of klout especially in a classroom with limited iPads. Students compose a survey question with multiple choice answers. It took a while to set it all up (as there is no dial to choose a set number of students – 10, 15, 20, etc…). However, once that was done it was easy to see the possibilities this activity possesses. A teacher could simply pass the iPad around from student to student until every one had made their selection. From there, the data can be graphed as a bar graph or pie chart. The only “wish it did this” moment was that the graphs are labeled with “option 1, option 2” rather than the actual choices given. The survey can be saved for later and students can always take a screenshot of the results and incorporate it into another project.

 

Collage created with Photovisi

The other 4 activities included in the app are:

  1. Place Value: students drag digits to match a number in written form
  2. Ordering Numbers: students stomp on caveman in order from least to greatest. Three settings included: integers, decimals, and fractions.
  3. Multiple Conveyor: students drop numbers in slots (reminded me a bit of Plinko for some reason) based on their divisibility. The first categories were multiples of 2, multiples of 2 &3, and multiples of 3.
  4. Algebra Vault: students can work through multiple steps to solve one-step and two-step equations.

 

 

Many thanks to Dave Brown, Interactive Elementary for generously donating promo codes for South San ISD’s middle school mathematics teachers to demo the app next Saturday during the iPad Camp techchef4u is presenting.


15 Sep 2011
Comments: 1

Clever Carnazzo's Cards

Meritorious Motion

Appy Alliteration: With an affinity for alliteration and all things Apple, I set out to congratulate Carnazzo on her creative use of cards with her class. Julio Barros, the iCardSort app developer, was kind enough to send us a few priceless promo codes for the full incredible iCardSort version. I forwarded one of these codes to Ms. Carnazzo in recognition for her savvy use of Songify and received another c-app-tivating lesson:

Meritorious Motion: Her class had been studying motion in science and had recently completed an empirical experiment to see which type of motion different items would show. After students completed the appropriate activity, she used iCardSort to group items to see what properties (e.f. bounce, spin, slide, roll) items in each group had in common. Students wanted to show that some items could be cleverly classified in more than one group so some are on the lines overlapping 2 groups. Students then brilliantly brainstormed other items that they thought would fit in the different groups. The pretty bright pink cards are their additional ideas.

 

If you are interested in replicating this lesson with your studious students, visit the iCardSort public decks in the next few days for the deck.

Noteworthy Newsletter: Also check out E-string‘s noteworthy newsletter which includes the original techchef4u HOTS Math Vocabulary lesson and some app-tastic Vimeo videos that highlight how to use iCardSort and how the app can be used in a lovely literature circle.

 

 

 


12 Sep 2011
Comments: 0

Carnazzo's Class Creations

Sums of 10 with Talking Heads

One of the most fulfilling parts of my jobs is to know that the technology recipes I create and present in my techchef4u blog are not only well-received but utilized to impact student learning. Ms. Carnazzo, a second grade teacher at Longs Creek in NEISD, has been such a wonderful inspiration for showcasing how these recipes can be used in an elementary classroom. It was a little over a week ago that I received her first email highlighting how she used Songify with her second grade class to practice short vowel sounds. This morning I received yet another email with a link to a “sums of 10” project she had her students complete with the free versions of the talking heads apps. Needless to say, if she keeps concocting these app-tastic lessons, I may just have to create a section for her on my blog entitled: Carnazzo’s Class Creations.

Carnazzo's Class Creation

Intrigued, I wanted to gain a little more insight in to her classroom and project management for the device. With only one iPad for her classroom, here is how she structured her latest creation:

  1. Students worked with a partner. They were given time to practice their portion prior to recording.
  2. While Ms. Carnazzo worked with the partners in a “quiet spot” to record their individual songs, the large group was playing a Tens Go Fish game
  3. When recording, one student would sing the first part and the other student would sing the response
  4. After all of the students had recorded, Ms. Carnazzo emailed the videos to herself and compiled them in iMovie to create one complete song.

 

While the students LOVE using the iPad any time, they are so proud of their products and always want to know when they will be posted online to share with their parents. What an app-laudable way to keep parents informed and to highlight student products while integrating technology to impact student learning!

Thanks to a generous PuppetPals Director’s Pass code donation, Ms. Carnazzo’s class (and a few others in the district) will be concocting a puppet show creation in the near future. Stay tuned for app-erific greatness!

The apps discussed here were highlighted in our

“appy hour 4 u”: surprisingly educational apps show.


11 Sep 2011
Comments: 0

Suprisingly Educational, Entertaining, and Engaging

I came across the lite version of MyPlayHome this week. The Lite version gives you full access and interactivity to two rooms, the kitchen and living room. Those two rooms alone kept my preschool son, also known as the app critic, busy for 30-45 minutes. His favorite discovery was that throwing away a piece of food in the kitchen replaces it in its prior location (e.g. table, cabinet, etc…). I later decided to check out the full version and was very pleased with the two extra rooms, bathroom and bedroom. Another fantastic bonus to the app is it will grow over time with more rooms and accessories. If they are taking suggestions, I would request a backyard with a grill, sandbox, picnic table, and flower/vegetable garden. What other toys can you say have that economical feature?

My PlayHome: DoodleBuddy Vocab

With that said, I will transfer my mommy hat to my educator cap… While this app may appear like a “doll house for the iPad generation”, it holds far more educational inspiration than sheer interactive entertainment. Thus, I have compiled a list of 7 ways I would use this app in the classroom:

  1. Have students create dialogue based on what the characters are doing in the house. This would be a great way for students to practice sentence structure, pronouns, and adjectives. (Consider taking screenshots and adding the dialogue with another app… like Doodle Buddy).
  2. Have students practice sequencing. Give students a series of directions or have students come up with a first/next/then structure for a task. (This could also be achieved with screenshots and Popplet Lite.)
  3. Have students practice vocabulary/spelling by taking a screenshot and opening it up in Doodle Buddy and adding words to annotate a room in the house.
  4. Have students discuss their own routines/traditions for getting ready in the morning, going to bed, family time, etc… (Consider having students take a screenshot and then discuss it in ShowMe or ScreenChomp.)
  5. Have students create/solve a math problem based on a scenario inspired by one of the rooms. (Challenge students to find/classify various shapes in each room.)
  6. Have students compare/contrast a room in the play home to the same room in their home.
  7. Have students write a descriptive paragraph about a room.

My PlayHome: Sequencing with Popplet Lite

 

 

 


07 Sep 2011
Comments: 0

HOT App 4 Analysis: iCard Sort

One of the first posts and series I created on my fledgling techchef4u blog was “Hot Apps 4 HOTS“. The series was assembled to highlight free apps that could be used in multiple content areas and grade levels to support Bloom’s Taxonomy. (Kathy Schrock classifies iCardSort as a tool for supporting “analysis” in her Bloomin’ iPad chart.)

 

 

As the “HOT Apps 4 HOTS” series was created as a resource for our district technology camp in June (and will now be offered at TCEA 2012), the original post was a supplement to the course and came fully loaded with screen-shots and suggestions for use as well as a full Math Vocabulary Lesson (e.g. teacher handout, student handout, sample Excel grid, and extension activities) utilizing the app. (Download the Math Vocabulary deck!)

After I posted the original series to my social networks (LinkedIn and Twitter), I received a message from Julio Barros, the iCardSort app developer, he said he loved the lesson and was in the process of building a site to compile the card lessons and decks that educators created.

E-String Newsletter Excerpt

Flash-forward three months…

… and not only does the the new version of iCardSort Lite (iCardSort) allow access to a public repository of decks people can share but also allows for users to acquire decks from more specific websites / wikis.

 

As if that wasn’t app-erific enough, E-string has just sent out a fantastic newsletter which includes the original techchef4u HOTS Math Vocabulary lesson and some app-tastic Vimeo videos that highlight how to use iCardSort and how the app can be used in a literature circle.

iCardSort during literature circle from Ipad Cabell on Vimeo.

Stay tuned for upcoming “appy hours 4 you” episode which will feature iCardSort with other apps that can be used for brainstorming and mind-mapping!