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23 Sep 2012
Comments: 4

Creating Digital Artifacts: Part 3

When I embarked on “family homework” with my son this year, and began thinking of ways to digitize and archive it, I had no idea or intention that it would become a series. However, over the past few weeks it has become a welcome app-ortunity to spend quality instruction time with my son that is enjoyable and engaging for both of us.

This week’s math assignment focused on locating patterns around the house. This reminded me of an old post “Math in My World” that showcased multiple ways to highlight shapes and geometry in the world around us.

Going on an iPattern Scavenger Hunt (image created with Pixlromatic's Creative Effects Pack)

 

Here are the workflow steps to create an iPattern Scavenger Hunt: 

  1. Use the iPad to capture photos of patterns around your house and outside.
  2. Use Skitch to annotate each photo to highlight the shape that creates the pattern.
  3. Import all photos into Strip Designer.
  4. Add text as necessary.
  5. Share work via email or Dropbox (comic can be saved as a PDF or a jpeg).
    1. If saved as a PDF, collect each student’s PDF and compile into one iPattern class book.

 

iPattern Comic created with Skitch and Strip Designer

 
Want more Digital Artifact Inspiration:

  1. Creating and Collecting Digital Work
  2. Creating Digital Artifacts with Sonic Pics
  3. Digital Homework Reflection with Audioboo
  4. Showcasing Digital Work: Leaving a Digital Learning Legacy

 

More TechChef4u Math iLessons HERE!

300+ iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

Did you know TechChef4u had a FB page?


19 Sep 2012
Comments: 5

MathyCathy

Introducing MathyCathy

Sometimes you just meet someone and you know you are kindred spirits. MathyCathy is that person. She is a middle school mathematics teacher here at Hill Country MS and a fellow lover of pi (true story: my car turned its odometer at 31415 miles and I almost stopped the car to take a pic and freeze that momentous occurrence in time). Like me, she also hails from Pennsylvania and is fairly new to the Eanes school district.

After teaching for 13 years, she is still as enthusiastic and passionate about students and helping them learn as someone who has just entered the field.

Cathy has already begun embracing the 1:1 8th iPad Rollout. Not only has she composed lessons that allow students to have familiarity and exposure with screen-casting, PDF annotation, and QR codes, she has tirelessly chronicled this journey in her blog and created a PDF handout with step-by-step directions for anyone to utilize. Check out all of her other resources on her Teachers Pay Teachers store.

iLesson: The first apptivity she created involves QR codes and 1-Step Equations. Students were given a strip of paper with a QR code and specific directions to scan the code and open the attached PDF and solve the problem using neu.Annotate+ PDF. Student were then prompted to write a story problem to solve another equation. (Each QR code went to 1 of 5 different PDF problems and the same equation for a word problem).

My Suggestion: The final word problem activity could be completed with the QR Code Beamer app as students could write their word problem and then beam it to another student to solve and return.

MathyCathy's iLesson

You will definitely be seeing and hearing more about the energetic and inspiring MathyCathy.

More TechChef4u Math iLessons HERE!

300+ iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

Did you know TechChef4u had a FB page?

 

 


18 Sep 2012
Comments: 3

Leaving Digital Learning Legacies

As the new school year begins, I thought it might be nice to catch up with one of my favorite iClassroom teachers, Ms. Carnazzo. Not only does she have her own Twitter teacher feed, but she has created a classroom Twitter account (@CarnazzosClass) to communicate with parents and other classrooms around the world. To visually showcase all of the iLearning, she uses Time Kiwi to turn her twitter feed into a visual timeline. As most of the posts are videos and images, it plays out beautifully and serves as a visual reminder of learning all year long. Lisa Carnazzo is an excellent model for how to be a narrative champion for her students and leave a beautiful digital learning legacy behind.

Carnazzo's Class Time Kiwi

 

Further thoughts and tips:
  1. TimeKiwi will also aggregate other services such as Flickr and Facebook.
  2. Use apps like Turbo CollagePic CollagePolyFrame to create collages for one post rather than posting a series of images all day long
  3. Use apps like Skitch to add text to images
  4. TimeKiwi is iOS friendly and will showcase the feed in vertical and horizontal timeline mode on your iPad.
  5. Of course, I felt compelled to create my own…TechChef4u’s Timekiwi
  6. Check out how other schools and districts are using Twitter and FB
  7. Great checklist for using Twitter in the primary classroom

 

More iLessons by CarnazzoWord Families and Math Facts and 10 More iLessons (with detailed write-ups).
 
300+ iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

Did you know TechChef4u had a FB page?


17 Sep 2012
Comments: 3

Creating Digital Artifacts: Part 2

Homework is a right of passage in the education realm. This week my kindergartner received his first family homework assignment to locate examples of numbers in our home and draw a picture of a few of the items. After we took a tour of the home and found and drew examples of objects with numerals, we decided to document our learning with the Audioboo app.

 

Here are a few suggestions for success:

  1. Discuss what you plan on saying prior to recording.
  2. Don’t over rehearse or you will exasperate your student (especially on a Sunday night before school).
  3. Utilize the pause feature for times the student needs coaxing or to hide long pauses
  4. Use a photo to represent the recording. Many times I use a drawing or a photo with no identifying information (as I knew I would be posting info online). This is also a good idea if you have students with certain acceptable use and publishing regulations.

 

Here are the steps to create a digital homework reflection with Audioboo: 

  1. Disable location services. If on a field trip, the location might be a nice addition but if in the classroom (or at home), I would not include the location as it is pinpoints the user fairly accurately and that may not be information you want to share online.
  2. Tap Record.
  3. Record up to 3 minutes of audio.
  4. Tap Publish.
  5. Add a photo.
  6. Title your Boo.
  7. Add a description and tags. Teaching students to add tags is a perfect for summarization and key words.
  8. Once it is published, you can grab the embed code from the site and add to your own website.

 

Check out Creating Digital Artifacts with Sonic Pics


08 Sep 2012
Comments: 8

Creating Digital Artifacts: Part 1

I recently wrote a post about “Creating and Collecting Digital Work“.  When my son brought home this really charming and heart-warming hand drawn “about me” book, I instantly wanted him to tell me about each picture. His descriptions were so amusing and charming, I felt inspired and compelled to create a digital artifact of his work… with my iPad.

Here are the steps:

  1. Take a photo of each page
  2. Crop photos as needed
  3. Bring any photos into Skitch that had a name or identifying information (as I knew I would be posting info online) and color over that info. This is also a good idea if you have students with certain acceptable use and publishing regulations.
  4. Save the edited photo to your photo roll
  5. Import all of the photos in order in to Sonic Pics
  6. Have your student record a description for each picture

 
The recording isn’t perfect, but I will tell you that the first take for a small child tends to be the best take as they are most candid and they become exasperated with rerecording the same material.

 


27 Aug 2012
Comments: 0

Mad about Mad Lips

Last March, “Appy Hours 4 U” featured Mad Lips as a “surprisingly educational” app. You will have to listen to the show to hear all of the educational ideas that were assigned to it. 😉 When featuring an app on a show, I always send out an email notifying the app developer. Many of them actually reply with a customary “thanks” and others begin an email correspondence that turns in to an e-friendship. The latter is the case with Mike from Mad Lips.

Recently he shared a new photo contest he has launched to promote Mad Lips! The winner(s) photos will be included in the standard photo pack with the latest Mad Lips release for all to use and animate.

Before I share more about the contest, let me showcase some fantastic examples of how Mad Lips has been used educationally:

Talking Book Covers: See full blog and info here.

Practicing Spanish: See full blog and info here.
 
Classifying Triangles: See full blog and info here.

 
And my favorite… A Retelling of “Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You Hear?”: See full blog.

 

Mike from Mad Lips

And now to the ... Contest Details: For those of you who enjoy amusing your students, desire 15 minutes or 15 seconds of fame, and have had a secret wish to be a viral meme… here is your chance! All you need is a penchant for the unknown. And thick skin. And a great sense of humor.

Mad Lips is a creative—surprisingly educational—app that lets anyone superimpose their talking lips over any picture. You can use Mad Lips in the classroom to deliver a talking book report. You can use it as a tool for practicing foreign languages. And now you can even use it to make your students laugh. Out loud. At your expense! Mad Lips is calling all teachers and educators to be part of the “Face The Music” challenge. It’s simple. Just send in a picture of your silliest face and the funniest image will be included as part of the standard photo pack in the next version of Mad Lips. You’ll be famous. Your students will love it. And you’ll be part of making the world a better place through creativity and laughter.

 

Fine Print:

  • Please send all images to info@affectiveapps.com
  • By sending in an image, you are explicitly granting the right to include it in the Mad Lips photo pack. This means that you grant the rights to use your image and likeness for a commercial application without any financial recuperation.
  • All participants must be 18 years of age.
  • The winning image will be chosen by the Mad Lips development team on September 30th, 2012. While not everyone will be included in the app, everyone who plays along is a winner in our books!

 
Good luck on the Contest. I am also very eager to hear how you are using Mad Lips in your classroom. Please share ideas and examples below in the comments.
 


21 Aug 2012
Comments: 0

Sync-up with Evernote

I was a bit of a late adopter to Evernote. Two years ago, I jumped on board and began dumping more and more info into my Evernote from “appy hour” scripts and lists of blog ideas to wireless passwords and conference notes.

Evernote Sync-up

 

Last Thursday I had the app-ortunity to visit the new Evernote headquarters in Austin with fellow members of the Eanes Ed Tech crew. Impressed with the idea of a 100 year company and a resource that I could continually trust to hold my most precious thoughts and resources, I was even more thrilled to learn about the other features and ideas Evernote offered and suggested for making my “second brain” more accessible and efficient:

  • Send notes into specific notebooks directly from your email. Let’s say you want to send a photo or important email directly to Evernote:
    • Locate your Evernote email address found under Account/Account Info (use this email address to send to)
    • Add a subject for your note in the subject line
    • Add the name of the notebook you wish to send it to in the subject line (e.g. “@Math”).
    • Add any tags you wish to use (e.g. “#equations #variable)
    • The final subject line might look something like this:
      • Step-by-Step Equations @Math #equations #variable
  • Tag notes and lessons with TEKS (standards) or keywords for quick search access
  • Create public checklists for school supplies and projects and share the note via a hyperlink
  • Utilize the Clearly plugin to format what you read online
  • Create stacked notebooks by simply dragging one notebook onto another. For example, let’s say you have an Algebra notebook and a Geometry notebook. Drag one on top of the other to create a stacked notebook entitled “Math”. The hierarchy really helps with organization and combats the summer brain drain by making the year’s previous notes a simple search away.
  • Scan documents directly with the Scansnap scanner
  • Make use of OCR for scanned documents and photos. Truly this is awesome! Imagine taking a snapshot of the notes on the board for the day and then being able to actually search your notes by the words in the photo. App-tastic!

 

Evernote has OCR with Photos and Scanned Docs

 

Other Evernote Resources I gleaned from the web:

 


14 Aug 2012
Comments: 10

Move over QR codes…

I am quite fond of tweeting and love to use QR codes, but was not aware until last week, that I could chirp too. Yes, thanks to one of my new teachers at Hill Country Middle School, I discovered the power of chirping. It is quite easy:

  • Step 1: Download the Chirp app on all devices you wish to communicate from and with.
  • Step 2: Decide which media you wish to chirp and share! You can share pictures from your camera and camera roll as well as notes and links!
  • Step 3: Be ready to be be amazed!

 

I can see this being a very useful tool for blasting out a message, task, or link to all students in a classroom. Consider giving a PDF a url or sharing an entire Dropbox folder of documents with one little chirp.
Or… let out a cheery chirp over the morning announcements and allow students to receive the unique link or message through the mobile devices… school wide!

 

Chirp sharing features highlighted in PolyFrame app

 
Don’t take my word for it… be blissfully amazed by the following video… Move over QR codes, there’s a new app in town… or in the cloud? How will you use Chirp?
 


08 Aug 2012
Comments: 0

Keeping up with Carnazzo

I had intended at one point to blog about all of Lisa Carnazzo’s (2nd grade teacher extroardinare and honorary member of the iVengers) excellent iPad lessons in further detail but this summer has been far busier than I anticipated. That being said, I thought I would share all of her special iCreations that she has been working on all summer long. As everyone begins their back-to-school shopping and routines, Lisa Carnazzo has developed a plethora of resources for students to utilize all year long (at home and at school):

 

Sight Words: First we begin with an excellent Symbaloo of word families which all hyperlink back to sample Quizlet decks. Each deck includes photos too! And if that isn’t cool enough, she has created a Snapguide for parents to showcase how to access and utilize the Quizlet decks to study their sight words.


 

Math Facts: Lisa has also created another Symbaloo of math facts which all hyperlink back to Quizlet decks to support that skill. Each deck includes photos too! And of course, she was only too thoughtful to create a Snapguide for parents to showcase how to access and utilize the Quizlet decks to study their math facts.

 

100’s Chart: Lisa has created yet another Snapguide to showcase how to use the 100’s chart to solve addition problems.

 

iPad Lessons: Lisa Carnazzo showcases all of her student projects on her class wiki. Check out all of her iPad Lessons on her site and read more in-depth blogs on how they were accomplished right here. If you are having issues accessing her Glogster pages on the iPad, try copying and pasting the url into an app like Rover. Here are a few iLessons you may have missed… The Lorax Cause & Effect and Mealworm Lifecycle which were both accomplished using the Tools 4 Students graphic organizer app.

Lisa Carnazzo's Class iPad Projects


 
Interested in Quizlet, Symbaloo, Snapguide, and iPad Lessons?:

 

 


25 Jul 2012
Comments: 1

More Science Investigations using the iPad

In the spirit of my last post, I would like to share another science apptivity for the iPad. I wish I could take credit for this one but Bryan P Doyle is the author of the resource. I had the pleasure of attending his session at the Area 7 Conference this summer. The topic was “iConstruction”. We were assembled in small groups and given our materials (e.g. marshmallows and uncooked spaghetti noodles) with the challenge to build the tallest tower that could outstand the other towers for the longest period of time (or 30 seconds). Bryan’s full post and more info for the app-tivity can be found on his blog.

Here’s how Bryan constructed the workflow of the iLearning experience:

  • Step 1: Open the Apptivity Directions (an ePub) on your iPad.
  • Step 2: Launch Safari to research the best configuration and structure for your tower
  • Step 3: Use the Neu.KidsDraw app to draw the tower you plan to build
  • Step 4: Utilize the iMotion HD app to record the actual construction

 

As Jon and I were the “problem children” in the group, we may have scrapped steps 2 and 3 and jumped straight to step 4. While we didn’t have the tallest tower, we ended up with the most expansive and had a wonderfully enjoyable time with the app-tivity. Below is the iMotion HD film that captured our construction process.
 

 
Check out other Science iLessons here.