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01 Apr 2012
Comments: 0

iClassify Triangles

Tasked to modify an existing paper-based lesson on classifying triangles to be more multimedia (and mobile) in nature, I chose to create two separate lessons:

Direct Instruction: If teachers wanted to include a direct teach piece, the following videos would serve the purpose.

 

Web 2.0/Computer:

  1. Student Task 1: Utilize the deck below to view the 7 mystery triangles. Check your understanding by flipping the card over to get the answer.
  2. Student Task 2: Draw a triangle to match the description for each of the mystery triangles using Paint or Smart Notebook Express (or a recording sheet).

 

 
 
iPad:

  1. Student Task 1: Access the Mystery Triangle deck using an iDevice and the Flashcards* app:
    1. Launch Flashcardlet app.
    2. Tap Flashcards.
    3. Tap + sign in upper right hand corner to Download from Quizlet.
    4. Tap in the search space.
    5. Type “Techchef4u”.
    6. Tap Creator and tap Search.
    7. Select Mystery Triangle Exercise.
    8. Tap Add to Library.
    9. Tap Cancel and tap Library to return to your personal Flashcard library.
    10. Tap to select Mystery Triangle Exercise to review deck.
    11. Tap Study and start studying.
    12. Review all 7 cards in the deck: swipe to go to the next card and tap on a card to see the back of the card.
  2. Student Task 2: Draw a triangle to match the description for each of the mystery triangles using Popplet Lite, iPen Free, or or Xnote.

 

 

Extensions:
  1. Have students create their own Quizlet deck for Mystery Quadrilaterals.
  2. Utilize Doodle Buddy, Story Lines for Schools, or TypeDrawing FREE to illustrate triangles.
  3. Have students make a talking triangle video for a specific triangle using Mad Lips.
  4. Have students create an instructional video to teach classifying triangles using ScreenChomp, Explain Everything, ShowMe, or Educreations. (See example Classifying Triangles video from Math Lambert).
  5. Have students create their own triangle song using SongifyVideo Star, or Videolicious.

 

See original Triangle Song and adaptation below: 

More iLessons:

  1. Math iLessons & Pinterest iPad Lessons

 


02 Mar 2012
Comments: 6

The 1 iPad Classroom: Episode 21

This is a supplement to “Appy Hours 4 You” Blog Talk Radio ShowEpisode 21: “The 1 iPad Classroom“. In this episode the famous Lisa Carnazzo (2nd grade elementary teacher and iChef) joined us to discuss her iClassroom. She touched on classroom management, the process of planning an iLesson, what road blocks she has encountered and how she overcame them, and the impact the iPad has had on student learning and engagement. She also highlighted some of her favorite apps and iLessons.

 

Stream this week’s episode or download it in iTunes directly.


Listen to internet radio with Techchef4u on Blog Talk Radio

 

Explore some of Lisa Carnazzo’s iLessons:

  1. Seasons (Science lesson using Puppet Pals)
  2. The Water Cycle (Science lesson using ScreenChomp, Songify, and Talkapella)
  3. Inferencing (Language Arts lesson using Talking Tom’s Love Letters and Popplet Lite)
  4. Weather (Science lesson using WunderMap and Talking Tom & Ben News)
  5. Job Application (Language Arts lesson using VoiceThread)
  6. Probability (Math lesson using Doodle Buddy and ScreenChomp)
  7. Parts of Speech (Language Arts lesson using Tacky Wales Create)
  8. Problem-Solving & Word Problems (Math lesson using Puppet Pals)
  9. Objects in Motion (Science lesson using iCardSort)
  10. Sums of 10 (Math lesson using Talking Tom, Ben, Gina, etc…)
  11. Short Vowels (Language Arts lesson using Songify)

 

Want More iLessons?:

 

Check out Yolanda Barker’s Videolicious Summary of our visit to Carnazzo’s iClassroom.

Visit to Carnazzo’s Class from Yolanda Barker on Vimeo.

 

 

 



20 Feb 2012
Comments: 3

Gratitude & App-reciation

During our TCEA 2012 workshops and seminars, Yolanda Barker and I handed out cards with promo codes on them for the following apps. I would first like to say that we do not endorse apps or products that we do not APP-SOLUTELY LOVE and USE. We would feature and mention the apps regardless of their appy donation(s). That being said, I would like to take a moment and thank the app developers for their gracious donations to our TCEA 2012 participants. I know everyone APP-RECIATED the schwag.

App-reciation Collage created with Turbo Collage app

 

  1. Puppet Pals Directors Pass: This app is a main staple in the techchef4u kitchen and can be utilized to create animated videos to support any content area at any grade level. (See Samples).
  2. To me By me: This “surprisingly educational” app allows users to write a letter to their future self to be delivered on a specific date. The app is perfect to practice letter-writing and goal-setting.
  3. Tacky Wales Create: This app is fantastic to teach parts of speech and creative writing. (See Samples).
  4. iCardSort: This app is a MUST for any classroom. It can be used in multiple settings (e.g. individual, cooperative pairs, small groups, stations, whole group) and has so much functionality (users can customize the background and decks in a variety of ways as well as wirelessly beam/blast decks to other users) and versatility (can be used in multiple content areas and grade levels). (See Samples).
  5. Explain Everything: This is by far the best paid app for screen-casting! You can import documents and presentations from Dropbox and Evernote and then annotate and narrate over them. Explain Everything also offers multiple export options that do not require logins! (See Sample).
  6. La Di Da: Created by the makers of Songify, this app allows users to speak a selection and transform it into a song. Clearly “surprisingly educational“, users can practice foreign language, speeches and soliloquies, and create innovative media to support any content area’s project. (See Samples).
  7. Root-1: Root-1 donated the cool “Begin Your Quest” eco-friendly shopping bags and have created the “surprisingly educational” app, StoryLines for Schools. The app is a modern day telephone game. Users choose a vocabulary word or quote or generate their own, pass the device to another student who must draw a representation of the word/quote, and pass it to yet another student who must decipher what the drawing is. The app can be used to support vocabulary, themes, events, and concepts in multiple content areas. Root-1 also makes a few other wonderfully free and educational apps: Word Joust K-5, Word Joust 6-8, xWords, and Word Kung Fu in beta (coming soon).
  8. Inspiration Diagrams: Inspiration Diagrams donated an iPad cover for each of our 3 workshops. I had the pleasure of being a beta tester for Inspiration Diagrams. The Lite version will be released in March and the full in April. The possibilities for support and integration of the writing process are endless. The current version of the app has 11 templates ranging from Cause and Effect and Book Report to Fiction Reading Notes and Chronology. The app still mimics Inspiration software in the outline and diagram views but boasts new features such as Send to Dropbox and iTunes. I am very eager to see what the final product will look like.
  9. Matt Barker: This is Yolanda Barker’s husband. He graciously donated his CD to our participants. While his music is copyright free and he welcomes those who seek to modify and integrate it into their own projects, I am sure he would love to hear how it is being used in the classroom or other settings (share your thoughts with him). Matt is also the artist behind “appy hours 4 u” intro, outro, and voice over and plays live at a few local hangouts in San Antonio.
  10. Coach’s Eye: This was a late edition to our schwag. Coach’s Eye is from the makers of ScreenChomp and Camtastia and offers countless classroom integration possibilities. The name is a bit misleading as it was originally created for coach’s to instantly review and analyze their player’s videos. The app allows users to record or import video, slow it down, narrate and annotate over it, and even export it! Imagine recording and reviewing a science lab, public speaking event or debate, or even  weather patterns on a field trip.

 

Please give these people and app developers a nice round of APP-LAUSE! Thanks Again!

 


16 Feb 2012
Comments: 4

Kicking it up an iNotch: The Water Cycle Explained

Many times I am asked (especially by Science teachers) if there is an app for a specific concept or topic. While there are multiple free instructionally sound resources for Math and English Language Arts, many times I struggle with finding appropriate (and free) apps for Science. When there is not an app or the app for the topic is more consumption-based than product-based in nature, consider using your arsenal of iTools to cook up one of your own.

I came across the Water Cycle app a few weeks back. It is a drag-and-drop labeling animated app which is a nice tool but fairly low on the Bloom’s Level. It works fine for an intro but doesn’t really allow students to truly apply their knowledge of the water cycle.

Science 2.8C: Explore the processes in the water cycle, including evaporation, condensation and precipitation, as connected to weather conditions.

The Water Cycle App


That’s why I was so thrilled when Ms. Carnazzo (2nd grade teacher) sent me her Water Cycle iLesson. Rather than letting an app teach the students the water cycle, Carnazzo’s class kicked up their iLearning a notch by creating their own screencasts to illustrate their knowledge of the water cycle using the app ScreenChomp. Students also used the app(s) Songify and Talkapella to make water cycle songs.

Carnazzo's Class Teaches the Water Cycle using ScreenChomp

 

Students worked in small groups of 4-6 to create their screencasts and scripted and practiced their lines prior to recording. Ms. Carnazzo located the images using MorgueFile and had them accessible for students to bring into the ScreenChomp app. (Check out all of Carnazzo’s iLessons).

See “Hot Apps 4 HOTS” for more app integration ideas to support Bloom’s Taxonomy!


18 Nov 2011
Comments: 2

Primarily iProbability

If you are looking for an elementary iPad lesson in the techchef4u kitchen, it was probably cooked up by the ingenious Chef Carnazzo. This probability iLesson is no different. Carnazzo and her second grade class used the app ScreenChomp (featured in “Screen-casting & Problem-solving 4 the Classroom“) as a culminating apptivity from a week of work on probability (e.g. “TEKS 2.11: Probability and statistics. (C) use data to describe events as more likely or less likely such as drawing a certain color crayon from a bag of seven red crayons and three green crayons.”)


Chef Carnazzo Cooks up iProbability

 

Here’s how she did it:

  1. Teacher Preparation: Ms. Carnazzo chose the background pics (clipart from MS Word) and imported them to Doodle Buddy.
  2. Student Choice: Students chose stickers in Doodle Buddy.
  3. Student Assessment: Students had to answer (in written form) teacher pre-generated questions in reference to their picture.
  4. Highly Engaging: Carnazzo originally created the apptivity for an intervention group and, of course, the rest of the class wanted to do the apptivity as well.
  5. Small Group: While Ms. Carnazzo was working with small groups to record their screen-cast, the rest of the class had completed independent practice assignments at their desk.
  6. Student Planning & Preparation: Students used the questions and their answers on the worksheet that Ms. Carnazzo had prepared to craft the narration for their screencast. Carnazzo found it was useful to do a couple of dry runs prior to hitting the record button.
  7. Student Reactions: Students loved the ScreenChomp final project. Carnazzo stated the students really liked the part where their drawings appeared on the screen in the final product.
  8. Other Applications: Carnazzo felt this tool had a lot of klout in the classroom as students do so much problem-solving in math. She plans on using it in the future to have students record and compare different solution strategies to a single problem.

 

Sample other iCreations from the Carnazzo Kitchen: Grammar & Literacy with Tacky Wales, short vowel sounds with Songify, Math fact families with Talking Tom and friends, classifying motion with iCardSort, integrating Math and literacy using Puppet Pals Director’s Pass

 


25 Oct 2011
Comments: 0

Tacky Wales: iTool for Literacy

If you follow my blog, you will know that Ms. Carnazzo has quite the iLesson toolkit (e.g short vowel sounds with Songify, Math fact families with Talking Tom and friends, classifying motion with iCardSort, and integrating Math and literacy using Puppet Pals Director’s Pass) for utilizing one iPad in her elementary classroom.

Tacky Wales Student Products


 
Her latest project utilized the paid app Tacky Wales: Create Your Own Story (thanks to a donation from the app developer for the promo code). In Language Arts, Ms. Carnazzos’ class has been working on parts of speech (mainly nouns and a sprinkling of verbs and adjectives).

Tacky Wales Student Products


 
Ms. Carnazzo’s model for executing this iLesson is well thought out and flawlessly planned:

  1. Setting the Stage: Before tackling the Tacky Wales project, students worked in collaborative groups to generate lists of words that fit into these categories (e.g. nouns, verbs, adjectives) as a reference.
  2. Modeling  & Guided Practice: She did one story with the whole class as an intro.
  3. Preview & Preselect Content: She then gave students a list of appropriate stories (topic and age-appropriate for second graders as some titles may be more adult-oriented) to choose from.
  4. Student Input: They voted and chose a title for their group.
  5. Facilitating  Student Efforts: Donette Sis (an Instructional Technology Coordinator) and Jennifer Heine (an Instructional Technology Specialist) came to the class with their iPads to help work with the small groups in completing their selected story. Teachers helped groups choose and input their words into the story framework.
  6. Extensions & Engagement: After completing and reading/enjoying the original story, students shook the iPad to Spoonerize (note: be aware that some spoonerisms may not be age-appropriate – consider re-shaking if you encounter this issue)…which of course they found quite hilarious!
  7. Presentation & Public Speaking: The next day students shared all their stories with the whole class.
  8. Cross-curricular Integration: Each group illustrated the setting of their own story. The importance of the story element, setting, is an integral focus for Reading.
 

Tacky Wales Student Products


 
Hungry for More?: Check out Words 4 Students for a list of free mad lib-like apps and suggestions for how they can be used in the classroom.

 

Thanks Tacky Wales for featuring  Ms. Carnazzo’s lesson on your site!

 


03 Oct 2011
Comments: 1

Words 4 Students: Episode 4

This is a supplement to “Appy Hours 4 You” Blog Talk Radio Show: Episode 4 – “Words 4 Students”. In this episode, we discussed up front how mad lib-like apps could be used instructionally with various content areas and grade levels and then discussed the main features of each app and what features were available as in-app purchases. (Also check out Teachervision for some great integration ideas.)

We also congratulated Ms. Carnazzo, a 2nd grade teacher in NEISD, for using our show to inspire and develop iLessons with her students: Talking Heads sums of 10 (from episode 1), Songify for short vowel sounds (from episode 1), and iCardSort for objects in motion (from episode 5).

Words 4 Students: features sorted w/ iCardSort app

This week we discussed the following free apps:

  1. Mad Libs (Website): Other paid versions: Goofy, Cool, and  On the Road. They also have Musical Mad Libs Songatron Free & Songatron $ which we haven’t had a chance to review.
  2. Tacky Wales: Also check out the paid app Tacky Wales Create.
  3. Wordventure (Website)
  4. Radlibz $
  5. Sparklefish (Twitter): Stay tuned for a holiday version.
 

Stream this week’s episode or download it in iTunes:

Listen to
internet radio with Techchef4u on Blog Talk Radio

15 Sep 2011
Comments: 1

Clever Carnazzo's Cards

Meritorious Motion

Appy Alliteration: With an affinity for alliteration and all things Apple, I set out to congratulate Carnazzo on her creative use of cards with her class. Julio Barros, the iCardSort app developer, was kind enough to send us a few priceless promo codes for the full incredible iCardSort version. I forwarded one of these codes to Ms. Carnazzo in recognition for her savvy use of Songify and received another c-app-tivating lesson:

Meritorious Motion: Her class had been studying motion in science and had recently completed an empirical experiment to see which type of motion different items would show. After students completed the appropriate activity, she used iCardSort to group items to see what properties (e.f. bounce, spin, slide, roll) items in each group had in common. Students wanted to show that some items could be cleverly classified in more than one group so some are on the lines overlapping 2 groups. Students then brilliantly brainstormed other items that they thought would fit in the different groups. The pretty bright pink cards are their additional ideas.

 

If you are interested in replicating this lesson with your studious students, visit the iCardSort public decks in the next few days for the deck.

Noteworthy Newsletter: Also check out E-string‘s noteworthy newsletter which includes the original techchef4u HOTS Math Vocabulary lesson and some app-tastic Vimeo videos that highlight how to use iCardSort and how the app can be used in a lovely literature circle.

 

 

 


12 Sep 2011
Comments: 0

Carnazzo's Class Creations

Sums of 10 with Talking Heads

One of the most fulfilling parts of my jobs is to know that the technology recipes I create and present in my techchef4u blog are not only well-received but utilized to impact student learning. Ms. Carnazzo, a second grade teacher at Longs Creek in NEISD, has been such a wonderful inspiration for showcasing how these recipes can be used in an elementary classroom. It was a little over a week ago that I received her first email highlighting how she used Songify with her second grade class to practice short vowel sounds. This morning I received yet another email with a link to a “sums of 10” project she had her students complete with the free versions of the talking heads apps. Needless to say, if she keeps concocting these app-tastic lessons, I may just have to create a section for her on my blog entitled: Carnazzo’s Class Creations.

Carnazzo's Class Creation

Intrigued, I wanted to gain a little more insight in to her classroom and project management for the device. With only one iPad for her classroom, here is how she structured her latest creation:

  1. Students worked with a partner. They were given time to practice their portion prior to recording.
  2. While Ms. Carnazzo worked with the partners in a “quiet spot” to record their individual songs, the large group was playing a Tens Go Fish game
  3. When recording, one student would sing the first part and the other student would sing the response
  4. After all of the students had recorded, Ms. Carnazzo emailed the videos to herself and compiled them in iMovie to create one complete song.

 

While the students LOVE using the iPad any time, they are so proud of their products and always want to know when they will be posted online to share with their parents. What an app-laudable way to keep parents informed and to highlight student products while integrating technology to impact student learning!

Thanks to a generous PuppetPals Director’s Pass code donation, Ms. Carnazzo’s class (and a few others in the district) will be concocting a puppet show creation in the near future. Stay tuned for app-erific greatness!

The apps discussed here were highlighted in our

“appy hour 4 u”: surprisingly educational apps show.


05 Sep 2011
Comments: 1

Give Your Classroom a Voice with Songify

Appy Hours 4 You: As I mentioned in my Fakebook post, my passion is locating, assembling, and creating resources and lesson ideas to support existing technology (whether it be Web 2.0 tools or iPads). Starting our blog talk radio show was one more way that I wanted to support teachers in the district. While we offer multiple face-to-face courses for the iPad, I still have many teachers ask me what you can do with the device. Even a list of suggested apps can be cumbersome if teachers don’t have a goody bag of ideas to accompany the app or an explanation of how products can be removed from the app or device (e.g. emailed, synced from the photo roll, uploaded to Youtube, downloaded from a random url, etc…).

Thus the reason I felt such a calling to create our “appy hours 4 you” talk show and the portable format. While the show does air live, the intent was for it to be streamed later in the day (e.g. during lunch or while folding laundry at home later that evening) or downloaded to iTunes and listened to on the way to work or at the doctor’s office. Lesson to Go… if you will. Supporting our intent to create a portable learning tool, the vast majority of our listens have been to archived shows. As I do not have information as to the actual listeners of the show (just how many have listened), I am always curious as to who the users are and what they have done with the information shared.

2nd Grade Songify Project

 

Where is Short U? created with Songify

Songify: On Friday, I had to look no further than my inbox. I received a enthusiastic email from Ms. Carnazzo, a second grade teacher in the district, who had been using my blog resources throughout the summer. This was her first year to have an iPad in her classroom and she wanted to share her Songify class project with me. Overjoyed, I clicked on the link she sent me and found a beautiful Glogster EDU page with pictures of the students (she had full internet permissions for each child) decked out in colorful boas and sunglasses posing with a microphone and their iPad. As if that wasn’t adorable enough, she had five different short vowel songs posted (with a text box above each for the lyrics). Each of the songs were created by recording the students singing using Songify (one of the apps we highlighted in our first episode).

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What’s Next for our Appolicious Elementary Stars and their Teacher? Not only did the students love the project, Ms. Carnazzo has decided to have students complete a similar project with Talking Tom and a math song. As she wants the song to be one piece, she has decided to record each excerpt separately and then piece them together in a video editing tool like iMovie.

As my intention for the radio show was to instruct, inspire, and instill an autonomy for building lessons with the iPad that supports student learning and engagement, I would love to hear from others who have used or adapted the lesson ideas we have shared on our show.

Please email or comment with your lesson summary and apps used.