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08 Nov 2012
Comments: 1

DIY Prezi

After I completed a round of teaching Evernote to Fiske’s class, I strolled down the hallway to say hello to Mrs. Yenca (otherwise known online as Mathy Cathy). She waved me in and I decided to stay for a while. Now, I have to say that her normal teaching methods are on par with a rock star. She knows how to orchestrate a lesson and keep students engaged like none other. BUT, today, I too fell under the spell and was mezmorized and floored by the app-tivity.

Mathy Cathy's Estimating Square Roots Zoomable PDF iLesson


 
Truly the idea of estimating square roots is nothing to write home about (or blog about for that matter). It was how she built her lesson that had me intrigued. Students used a PDF that Cathy created from a Keynote slide and zoomed in and out to problem solve. No need for extra paper or space because a PDF does not become grainy when zoomed in and out.

Zoomable PDF for Problem-Solving


 
I don’t want to steal her iThunder – for more details on this truly ingenious apptivity, visit her blog.

I do want to give you a taste of her personality, though. Few educators could enthrall a classroom and an ed tech with estimating square roots. Teachers like Cathy are ideal candidates for a Flipped Classroom and video instruction model. Her teaching methods truly match her captivating apptivity.

 

For more about Mathy Cathy, read my first Mathy Cathy post, and check out her blog.

Creative Title (e.g. DIY Prezi) credit goes to @Classroom_tech

475+  iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

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23 Sep 2012
Comments: 4

Creating Digital Artifacts: Part 3

When I embarked on “family homework” with my son this year, and began thinking of ways to digitize and archive it, I had no idea or intention that it would become a series. However, over the past few weeks it has become a welcome app-ortunity to spend quality instruction time with my son that is enjoyable and engaging for both of us.

This week’s math assignment focused on locating patterns around the house. This reminded me of an old post “Math in My World” that showcased multiple ways to highlight shapes and geometry in the world around us.

Going on an iPattern Scavenger Hunt (image created with Pixlromatic's Creative Effects Pack)

 

Here are the workflow steps to create an iPattern Scavenger Hunt: 

  1. Use the iPad to capture photos of patterns around your house and outside.
  2. Use Skitch to annotate each photo to highlight the shape that creates the pattern.
  3. Import all photos into Strip Designer.
  4. Add text as necessary.
  5. Share work via email or Dropbox (comic can be saved as a PDF or a jpeg).
    1. If saved as a PDF, collect each student’s PDF and compile into one iPattern class book.

 

iPattern Comic created with Skitch and Strip Designer

 
Want more Digital Artifact Inspiration:

  1. Creating and Collecting Digital Work
  2. Creating Digital Artifacts with Sonic Pics
  3. Digital Homework Reflection with Audioboo
  4. Showcasing Digital Work: Leaving a Digital Learning Legacy

 

More TechChef4u Math iLessons HERE!

300+ iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

Did you know TechChef4u had a FB page?


19 Sep 2012
Comments: 5

MathyCathy

Introducing MathyCathy

Sometimes you just meet someone and you know you are kindred spirits. MathyCathy is that person. She is a middle school mathematics teacher here at Hill Country MS and a fellow lover of pi (true story: my car turned its odometer at 31415 miles and I almost stopped the car to take a pic and freeze that momentous occurrence in time). Like me, she also hails from Pennsylvania and is fairly new to the Eanes school district.

After teaching for 13 years, she is still as enthusiastic and passionate about students and helping them learn as someone who has just entered the field.

Cathy has already begun embracing the 1:1 8th iPad Rollout. Not only has she composed lessons that allow students to have familiarity and exposure with screen-casting, PDF annotation, and QR codes, she has tirelessly chronicled this journey in her blog and created a PDF handout with step-by-step directions for anyone to utilize. Check out all of her other resources on her Teachers Pay Teachers store.

iLesson: The first apptivity she created involves QR codes and 1-Step Equations. Students were given a strip of paper with a QR code and specific directions to scan the code and open the attached PDF and solve the problem using neu.Annotate+ PDF. Student were then prompted to write a story problem to solve another equation. (Each QR code went to 1 of 5 different PDF problems and the same equation for a word problem).

My Suggestion: The final word problem activity could be completed with the QR Code Beamer app as students could write their word problem and then beam it to another student to solve and return.

MathyCathy's iLesson

You will definitely be seeing and hearing more about the energetic and inspiring MathyCathy.

More TechChef4u Math iLessons HERE!

300+ iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

Did you know TechChef4u had a FB page?

 

 


17 Sep 2012
Comments: 3

Creating Digital Artifacts: Part 2

Homework is a right of passage in the education realm. This week my kindergartner received his first family homework assignment to locate examples of numbers in our home and draw a picture of a few of the items. After we took a tour of the home and found and drew examples of objects with numerals, we decided to document our learning with the Audioboo app.

 

Here are a few suggestions for success:

  1. Discuss what you plan on saying prior to recording.
  2. Don’t over rehearse or you will exasperate your student (especially on a Sunday night before school).
  3. Utilize the pause feature for times the student needs coaxing or to hide long pauses
  4. Use a photo to represent the recording. Many times I use a drawing or a photo with no identifying information (as I knew I would be posting info online). This is also a good idea if you have students with certain acceptable use and publishing regulations.

 

Here are the steps to create a digital homework reflection with Audioboo: 

  1. Disable location services. If on a field trip, the location might be a nice addition but if in the classroom (or at home), I would not include the location as it is pinpoints the user fairly accurately and that may not be information you want to share online.
  2. Tap Record.
  3. Record up to 3 minutes of audio.
  4. Tap Publish.
  5. Add a photo.
  6. Title your Boo.
  7. Add a description and tags. Teaching students to add tags is a perfect for summarization and key words.
  8. Once it is published, you can grab the embed code from the site and add to your own website.

 

Check out Creating Digital Artifacts with Sonic Pics


08 Aug 2012
Comments: 0

Keeping up with Carnazzo

I had intended at one point to blog about all of Lisa Carnazzo’s (2nd grade teacher extroardinare and honorary member of the iVengers) excellent iPad lessons in further detail but this summer has been far busier than I anticipated. That being said, I thought I would share all of her special iCreations that she has been working on all summer long. As everyone begins their back-to-school shopping and routines, Lisa Carnazzo has developed a plethora of resources for students to utilize all year long (at home and at school):

 

Sight Words: First we begin with an excellent Symbaloo of word families which all hyperlink back to sample Quizlet decks. Each deck includes photos too! And if that isn’t cool enough, she has created a Snapguide for parents to showcase how to access and utilize the Quizlet decks to study their sight words.


 

Math Facts: Lisa has also created another Symbaloo of math facts which all hyperlink back to Quizlet decks to support that skill. Each deck includes photos too! And of course, she was only too thoughtful to create a Snapguide for parents to showcase how to access and utilize the Quizlet decks to study their math facts.

 

100’s Chart: Lisa has created yet another Snapguide to showcase how to use the 100’s chart to solve addition problems.

 

iPad Lessons: Lisa Carnazzo showcases all of her student projects on her class wiki. Check out all of her iPad Lessons on her site and read more in-depth blogs on how they were accomplished right here. If you are having issues accessing her Glogster pages on the iPad, try copying and pasting the url into an app like Rover. Here are a few iLessons you may have missed… The Lorax Cause & Effect and Mealworm Lifecycle which were both accomplished using the Tools 4 Students graphic organizer app.

Lisa Carnazzo's Class iPad Projects


 
Interested in Quizlet, Symbaloo, Snapguide, and iPad Lessons?:

 

 


10 May 2012
Comments: 0

iClassify Triangles: Part 2

This post is a follow-up to the original iLesson “iClassify Triangles“. The original lesson provides a few direct instruction videos on classifying triangles, a set of mystery triangle flash cards, and a handful of extension app-tivities. The following could be used as a stand-alone geometry resource or an additional app-tivity to support the initial iLesson.

Student Task: Use the Geoboard app to make an example triangle for each of the following triangles using the specified color:

  1. Yellow: obtuse isosceles
  2. Red: scalene right
  3. Purple: right isosceles
  4. White: acute scalene
  5. Green: acute isosceles
  6. Orange: obtuse scalene

 

Classifying Triangles with Geoboad app

 

Extensions: Complete the question and one of the tasks below.

  1. Question: Which triangle can you not make and why? acute equilateral
  2. Task 1: Take a screenshot and bring the completed Geoboard image up in Skitch. Calculate the perimeter and area of each of the triangles.
  3. Task 2: Graph triangles in Geometry Pad. (Teacher could provide a task card with specific directions: e.g. “graph an isosceles right triangle in quadrant 2”).

 
 Check out these other Math iLessons.


01 Apr 2012
Comments: 0

iClassify Triangles

Tasked to modify an existing paper-based lesson on classifying triangles to be more multimedia (and mobile) in nature, I chose to create two separate lessons:

Direct Instruction: If teachers wanted to include a direct teach piece, the following videos would serve the purpose.

 

Web 2.0/Computer:

  1. Student Task 1: Utilize the deck below to view the 7 mystery triangles. Check your understanding by flipping the card over to get the answer.
  2. Student Task 2: Draw a triangle to match the description for each of the mystery triangles using Paint or Smart Notebook Express (or a recording sheet).

 

 
 
iPad:

  1. Student Task 1: Access the Mystery Triangle deck using an iDevice and the Flashcards* app:
    1. Launch Flashcardlet app.
    2. Tap Flashcards.
    3. Tap + sign in upper right hand corner to Download from Quizlet.
    4. Tap in the search space.
    5. Type “Techchef4u”.
    6. Tap Creator and tap Search.
    7. Select Mystery Triangle Exercise.
    8. Tap Add to Library.
    9. Tap Cancel and tap Library to return to your personal Flashcard library.
    10. Tap to select Mystery Triangle Exercise to review deck.
    11. Tap Study and start studying.
    12. Review all 7 cards in the deck: swipe to go to the next card and tap on a card to see the back of the card.
  2. Student Task 2: Draw a triangle to match the description for each of the mystery triangles using Popplet Lite, iPen Free, or or Xnote.

 

 

Extensions:
  1. Have students create their own Quizlet deck for Mystery Quadrilaterals.
  2. Utilize Doodle Buddy, Story Lines for Schools, or TypeDrawing FREE to illustrate triangles.
  3. Have students make a talking triangle video for a specific triangle using Mad Lips.
  4. Have students create an instructional video to teach classifying triangles using ScreenChomp, Explain Everything, ShowMe, or Educreations. (See example Classifying Triangles video from Math Lambert).
  5. Have students create their own triangle song using SongifyVideo Star, or Videolicious.

 

See original Triangle Song and adaptation below: 

More iLessons:

  1. Math iLessons & Pinterest iPad Lessons

 


01 Apr 2012
Comments: 0

iFactor: Prime Factorization Cubed!

After meeting with the 5th Math Specialist to collaborate and plan, I feel like we have a really good plan for next week’s 5th Math training. The intent was to provide technology tools for teachers that would not serve as “one hit wonders.” Rather, we wanted to provide teachers with a Bag of iTricks that could be used to support multiple mathematics skills… and other content areas. The iLesson below not only reduces paper waste (the original document was 9 pages) but provides a viable alternative to a pencil and paper task.

The original document included a direct teach piece on prime factorization, a Frayer model template for Prime Numbers, 4 recording sheets for factoring numbers in multiple ways, and a template for creating your own prime numbers matching card sort. Using a combination of the apps iPen Free app and Popplet Lite, I was able to reduce the packet to a page or two.
 
Student Task 1: Frayer Model using Popplet Lite

  1. Double tap on the screen to create a popple.
  2. Tap the “T” to add text and type “Prime Number”.
  3. Tap the gray circle connector to create another popple attached to the first one.
  4. Type “Example” in the second popple.
  5. Tap the icon of the pen to draw your example.
  6. Tap the Prime Number popple to create another popple attached to it.
  7. Type “Non-Example” in the third popple.
  8. Draw your non-example example.
  9. Tap the Prime Number popple to create another popple attached to it.
  10. Type “Definition” in the fourth popple and write your definition.
  11. Tap Export and Save the image as a jpeg.

 
The iLesson video (Student Task 1) below was created with the Reflections web app that allows screen mirroring of your iPad.

 

Student Task 2: Prime Numbers Two Ways

  1. On page 1: Import your Prime Number Frayer Model that was created in Popplet Lite.
  2. On page 2:
    1. Find the Prime Factorization of 80 in red.
    2. Find a second way to factor 80 in blue.
    3. Write the prime factorization of 80 using exponents in green.
  3. On page 3: Complete steps 1-3 for 30.
  4. On page 4: Complete steps 1-3 for 72.
  5. On page 5: Complete steps 1-3 for 120.
  6. On page 6: Find the value of 3 x 3 x 3 x 5.
  7. On page 7: Find the value of 3² x 5 x 7
  8. On page 8: Complete the Reflection using a combination of pen and text.
    1. How do you know when you have found a number’s prime factorization?
    2. Does every number have a prime factorization? Explain.
    3. Can a number have more than one prime factorization? Why?
  9. On page 9: Complete the Reflection using a combination of pen and text.
    1. Find all the numbers less than 50 that have at least one 2 and at least one 5 in their prime factorization.
    2. What do you notice about these numbers?
  10. On page 10-12: Solve the following problems:
    1. Find the prime factorization of 240.
    2. Carson and Beth are comparing their secret numbers. Carson’s number has a prime factorization with 2 numbers and Beth has a prime factorization with 3 numbers. Beth says this means her number is larger. Is Beth correct? Explain and give examples.
    3. What is the value of 3² x 5³ x 7.
  11. Email your book to your teacher (there is also an option to print if you have access to an airprinter).

 

Factoring 2 Ways with iPen Free app

 

Student Task 3: Prime Number Matching Card Sort using Popplet Lite

  1. Create 8-10 unconnected popples.
  2. Each popple should be a number, a factorization, or a prime factorization with exponents.
  3. Include some items that could have more than one match.
  4. Pass the Popplet to your partner and have him/her connect the popplets that match (remember some popples may be connected to more than one popple).
  5. If you have any remaining items, create two popples for each unused popple to illustrate prime factorization in two ways. (Change the frame color of the left-over popples).

 


Other iLessons with Popplet & iPen:
  1. Multiplication Stories (iPen)
  2. Inferencing iValentines (Popplet)
  3. More Vocabulary & Frayer Models (Popplet)
  4. Sequencing (Popplet)
  5. Character Map (Popplet)
  6. Geometry (Popplet)
  7. Other Math iLessons

 

Popplet Lite was also featured in “Hot Apps 4 HOTS” iBook to support Bloom’s taxonomy in the iClassroom.

 


31 Mar 2012
Comments: 0

Doodle Zoo

After meeting with the 5th Math Specialist to collaborate and plan, I feel like we have a really good plan for next week’s 5th Math training. The intent was to provide technology tools for teachers that would not serve as “one hit wonders.” Rather, we wanted to provide teachers with a Bag of iTricks that could be used to support multiple mathematics skills… and other content areas. The iLesson below not only reduces paper waste but provides a viable alternative to a pencil and paper task.

The original task included an herb garden plot, I simply took the same numbers and modified it to work with the stamps and images available in Doodle Buddy for iPad.

The iLesson video below was created with Reflections web app that allows screen mirroring of your iPad.

Student Task: Create a square model that represents the 4 divisions of a children’s zoo. Divide and label the square plot to reflect the following:

    1. 50% Carnivores
    2. 25% Herbivores
    3. 15% Amphibians
    4. 10% Aviary

 

Here are the steps in Doodle Buddy:

    1. Choose a background if appropriate (from the tic-tac-toe icon).
    2. Use the shape stencil to create a square.
      1. Leave some work space on the right or left of your square.
    3. Fill in the square with the color of your choice.
    4. Draw a line to represent 50%.
    5. Add a stamp to represent that division (e.g. lion represents carnivores).
      1. If the stamps featured are not available, check the shopping bag icon to purchase them with Doodle Bucks. You should be give enough default bucks to “purchase” a couple of stamp packs.
    6. Add a text box to represent 50%.
    7. Repeat steps 4-6 for the rest of the sections.
    8. Use a combination of the drawing and text tools to answer the following problem
      1. If the Amphibians are allocated 75 square feet of space, how many square feet are in the entire children’s zoo?
    9. Save a copy of your project to the photo album via the wrench icon.
    10. Send the image via email to your teacher via the wrench icon.
    11.  Include your explanation for the question in #8 in the body of the email.

 

Doodle Zoo Final Product using Doodle Buddy

 

Possible Extensions:

  1. Have students complete the square feet for the rest of sections in the children’s zoo.
  2. Have students create their own problem with their own percentages and have their partner solve it. Doodle Buddy contains stamp packs that would lend themselves to:
    1. Animals in an Aquarium
    2. Animals in a Petting Zoo or Farm
    3. Food on a Lunch Tray
    4. Cars in a Parking Lot
  3. Import the image into ScreenChomp and complete the problem solving and explanation with audio.

 

Other iLessons Utilizing Doodle Buddy:

Doodle Buddy was also featured in “Hot Apps 4 HOTS” iBook to support Bloom’s taxonomy in the iClassroom.


26 Mar 2012
Comments: 14

Integrating Infographics into the iClassroom

So TechChef4U has caught the Infographics Influenza! Being a bit of a Pinterest fanatic, I have found an easy way to support and feed my Infographics Habit. Continuing to stock pile Educational Infographics on my Pinterest board, I waited until I found an app-ortunity to share these resources with one of my teachers and create a delectable lesson. During my stint as an 8th Math tutor, I had a few of the teachers approach me about engaging math lessons that they could utilize with 8th Math after the STAAR test. I mentioned the topic of infographics and shared a few of the ones I had collected. Then I worked with one of the teachers in particular, Mrs. Simpson, to hash out the details.

Pinterest: Educational Infographics

 

Common Core Standards: Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears”

What is an Infographic? Before we continue… let’s define and explore the topic of “infographics” further. No need to recreate the wheel… Kathy Schrock has already blazed the trail and created an amazing Vimeo video on the topic.

8 Great Infographic Stations: Teacher could choose a different infographic (from the list of 120+) for each station or have all of the students use the same infographic for each station. Infographics can be accessed from computers or mobile devices (as most are just images and not flash-based). Note: The EDU Infographic Pinterest board has been curated and reviewed mostly via a mobile phone – please preview and preselect infographics prior to utilizing the resources with your students.

  1. Station 1: List 5-10 Observations or Trends for the Infographic.
    1. This could be accomplished with Todays MeetEdmodo, or Lino It  from a mobile device or computer.
  2. Station 2: Generate 2 Truths & a Lie for the Infographic (prompt parter or other groups to determine which statements are true and which ones are lies).
    1. This could be accomplished with Todays MeetEdmodo, or Lino It  from a mobile device or computer.
    2. Todays Meet (modification): use Todays Meet activity as an exit ticket, print the transcript from Todays Meet, use as a warm-up the next day. Students would choose 4-6 statements and prove/disprove them.
  3. Station 3: Create a Word Problem based on data provided in the infographic (pass your problem to a partner or other group to solve).
    1. Word Problems could be created with a basic voice recording app or apps like Talking Tom & Ben, Puppet Pals, Sock Puppets, QR Code Beamer, Mad Lips, Comic Touch Lite, etc…
    2. Word Problems could be created with Web 2.0 tools like Make Belief Comix and Voki.
  4. Station 4: Answer Specific Questions on the Infographic (teacher could create a task or recording sheet for a specific infographic prior to that day.)
    1. Based on the trend and data given, make predictions or conclusions.
    2. Determine validity of statements.
    3. Teacher could generate multiple True/False Statements (prior to class) and have students prove/disprove them (some could require calculation).
    4. Create a Data table for one of the graphs.
    5. Calculate Central tendency for the data.
    6. Determine what the population of interest is.
    7. Locate bias in the infographic.
  5. Station 5: Determine how the information could be misused by supporting two separate arguments with the same graph, data set, or infographic.
  6. Station 6: Write a story about a person that the population describes or Create a Popplet to illustrate an individual from the population sample (similar to Visual.ly Twitterize).
  7. Station 7: Create a sample poll with questions that could have been asked to generate the infographic given? Then poll actual students in your classroom or at your campus and compare the data (use tools like Poll Everywhere, Edmodo, or  Google Forms – all 3 can be accessed from a mobile device and computer).
  8. Station 8: Determine data and questions for the infographic that you feel should have been included or would benefit the study.
Students Love Technology

Via: OnlineEducation.net

More Info/Resources on Teaching with Infographics 

  1. Kathy Schrock: Infographics as a Creative Assessment
  2. Data Visualizations & Infographics
  3. Project 3 Infographics: Ideas for using infographics across core curriculum.
  4. Data Visualized: More on Teaching with Infographics
  5. Where the Classroom Ends: Great ideas on using infographics to teach explicit/implicit arguments and utilize animated infographics.
  6. 10 Awesome Free Tools to Make Infographics