Call us toll free: 210-710-2434
Best WP Theme Ever!
Call us toll free: 210-710-2434
08 Aug 2012
Comments: 0

Keeping up with Carnazzo

I had intended at one point to blog about all of Lisa Carnazzo’s (2nd grade teacher extroardinare and honorary member of the iVengers) excellent iPad lessons in further detail but this summer has been far busier than I anticipated. That being said, I thought I would share all of her special iCreations that she has been working on all summer long. As everyone begins their back-to-school shopping and routines, Lisa Carnazzo has developed a plethora of resources for students to utilize all year long (at home and at school):

 

Sight Words: First we begin with an excellent Symbaloo of word families which all hyperlink back to sample Quizlet decks. Each deck includes photos too! And if that isn’t cool enough, she has created a Snapguide for parents to showcase how to access and utilize the Quizlet decks to study their sight words.


 

Math Facts: Lisa has also created another Symbaloo of math facts which all hyperlink back to Quizlet decks to support that skill. Each deck includes photos too! And of course, she was only too thoughtful to create a Snapguide for parents to showcase how to access and utilize the Quizlet decks to study their math facts.

 

100’s Chart: Lisa has created yet another Snapguide to showcase how to use the 100’s chart to solve addition problems.

 

iPad Lessons: Lisa Carnazzo showcases all of her student projects on her class wiki. Check out all of her iPad Lessons on her site and read more in-depth blogs on how they were accomplished right here. If you are having issues accessing her Glogster pages on the iPad, try copying and pasting the url into an app like Rover. Here are a few iLessons you may have missed… The Lorax Cause & Effect and Mealworm Lifecycle which were both accomplished using the Tools 4 Students graphic organizer app.

Lisa Carnazzo's Class iPad Projects


 
Interested in Quizlet, Symbaloo, Snapguide, and iPad Lessons?:

 

 


26 Jun 2012
Comments: 4

Creating and Collecting Digital Work – ISTE 2012

One of the most entertaining and engaging sessions I had the pleasure to attend was “Creating and Collecting Digital Work” with Tammy Worcester and Kevin Honeycutt. Not only were the tools they shared easily applicable to any classroom, their presentation style truly embodied many of the ideals of creativity, play, and value shared in some of the earlier sessions I attended (which will be summarized in a later blog).

Thoroughly enjoyed "Creating & Collecting Digital Work" session with Kevin Honeycutt

 
Tammy modeled the role of the teacher and Kevin channeled his inner child. The session essentially focused on creating and collecting digital work in various forms (e.g screencasting desktop work, capturing traditional pencil and paper tasks, recording audio products, and transforming digital creations into tangible items). All of the resources shared for the session (and many more) can be found on Tammy’s site.

Glad I sat in the front row for this session – my iPad was able to capture some of the best moments. Grab a bag of popcorn and enjoy!
 

 
Truly loved the idea of collecting all of the work in a digital class dropbox created with a Google Form.
 

 
One last nugget. Kevin shared a great idea. Create coffee mugs with a QR code hyperlinked to one of your student’s digital delights or a classroom site that is constantly updated with student work – what a great way to start a teacher’s or parent’s morning.


01 Jun 2012
Comments: 1

Climbing the Bloom's Ladder with HOT Web Apps

Apps and web apps are only as purposeful as the products and projects that they are used to create. After spending copious amounts of time publishing “Hot Apps 4 HOTS” to iBooks, I felt I should allocate some time to focus on web apps and how they too can be used to support higher order thinking skills.

I decided to model how Todays Meet and Quizlet can be used in every level of Bloom’s to support student learning and application across the curriculum. (Also check out the original Todays Meet lesson.) Both Todays Meet and Quizlet can be accessed and utilized on an iPad or a computer.

 

 

Nota: Using Todays Meet Screenshots

 

Today’s Meet & Quizlet: 

  1. TASK A: Locate a Quizlet deck for your content area and develop 2 or 3 questions (each at different levels of Bloom’s) to prompt and guide student learning in your classroom. Post your questions to Todays Meet with the Quizlet deck linked.
    1. Art & Literature
    2. Language & Vocabulary
    3. Math & Science
      1. Mystery Triangle
      2. Histology
    4. History & Geography
    5. Professional & Careers
    6. Technology 
  2. Task B: Create your own Quizlet deck for your content area. Develop 1 Bloom’s level question to prompt student learning in your classroom based on the deck. Post your questions to Todays Meet with the Quizlet deck linked.

 

Further Resources: Tasked over the fall semester to review Web 2.0 tools, our team created a blog of 60+ Web 2.0 tools that includes a brief description of each and highlights a couple of ways each tool can be integrated into the classroom. Symbaloo was one of our reviewed tools so I decided to use it to house the rest of the lot. Consider using one the apps below and mapping out how you would use it at each level of Bloom’s (or perhaps two or three levels).

Symbaloo of NEISD Reviewed Web 2.0 Tools

 

More Quizlet Resources: 
  1. 3 Interactive iPad App-tivities that aren’t Apps
  2. How to use Quizlet on the iPad
  3. Math-tastic iVocabulary

 


18 May 2012
Comments: 0

3 Interactive iPad App-tivities that aren't Apps!

As I mentioned in a previous post, I am always intrigued by sites that offer interactivity but are not apps (ala Quizlet). I had observed Mr. Wayment’s class reviewing the Greek & Latin roots using an 82 card Quizlet deck he had created. Students were utilizing various activities within Quizlet (e.g. Speller, Learn, and Scatter) to review the terms.

 

 
While the students were engaged in the app-tivity, Mr. Wayment shared another online resource that he had been using (on both the computer and the iPad)… Jeopardy Labs. Though I did not have a chance to create my own, I did explore the sample Mr. Wayment created on Greek & Latin Roots. Although he initially created the resource online, he has the flexibility to have students access it in small groups on the computer and from the iPad.

Wayment's Greek and Latin Roots: Online Jeopardy

 

Here’s how it works:

  1. Multiple Teams: The site allows multiple teams (up to 12) to play the same board.
  2. Choose a Category and a Point Value.
  3. Answer in question form: They are presented with a statement and must verbalize the correct question to match (e.g. Statement: “Derivative of “digit” that means magic tricks, card tricks, or sleight-of-hand” Correct Response: “What is prestidigitation?”)
  4. Assigning Points and Recording Scores: If the team provides a correct answer, they tap the + and the point value of the item is added to their leader board. If they answered incorrectly, they tap the – and the point value of the item is removed from their leader board.
  5. Repeat and Enjoy: After the points are recorded, the teams would return to the game board and a different team would repeat the category and point value selection.

 

 

Though the lesson itself essentially was English Language Arts focused in nature, the idea of jeopardy for any content area or grade level is fully translatable and customizable. Create your own Jeopardy Board or utilize the current pre-created templates is FREE.

 

While researching Jeopardy Labs, I came across Bingo Baker (another online resource created by the maker of Jeopardy Lab). With this tool, you can easily create and play your own Bingo Boards (online and directly from the iPad) with no login or payment. Each Bingo Card includes 25 squares (including one free spot). The cards can also be printed as a PDF for playing as a hard copy or annotating in an app like PaperPort Notes or Notability.

 

Bingo Baker step-by-step directions: I created a Snapguide for how to create and play your Bingo Card.

Snapguide: How to Create & Play BINGO on your iPad

 

Interesting note…
  1. I created the card on my iPad and went into play mode on the iPad and then used the same link on my computer for the card and had a different variation of the same card.
  2. If you refresh the page on the iPad or the computer, it will create a different variation of the card using the same words entered.
  3. One cannot edit the card once it has been created (only clone it).

 

Further English & Vocabulary Resources: 
  1. How to use Quizlet on the iPad
  2. Math-tastic iVocabulary
  3. iVocabulary
  4. Paperless Passages with PaperPort 
  5. Putting an iSpin on Video Vocabulary

 


15 May 2012
Comments: 0

Pop in with BrainPOP

By a series of fortuitous events (e.g. a last minute cancellation and a random email), I had the app-ortunity to lead a webinar for BrainPOP on “iProductivity in the iClassroom“. The session covered a few online tools for assessment, tips to preview and preselect apps, shared 17 free apps that can be used to create student products, and culminated with tips for submitting and preparing student work.

Andrew from BrainPOP and Me at Mobile 2012 edited with online version of BeFunky

 

The archived webinar can be located through the BrainPOP site. We received some great feedback on the content delivered in the session and I am looking forward to the possibility of delivering a follow-up iPad session over the summer. Thanks again Andrew for the app-ortunity to share my app-thusiasm for iLearning.

 


25 Apr 2012
Comments: 0

The Power of Google

Yes, I typically am an Apple fan girl, but last night (while watching an episode of New Girl), the new Google commercial made me smile and dare I say shed a happy tear. Part of the my emotion was due to the sentimental nature of the video and the other to the power, versatility, and ever-evolving nature of Google tools.
 

 
That being said, I thought I would share my new favorite Google tool.. which is actually a script… Flubaroo. I was first introduced to the tool in a session with Wesley Molyneaux at Mobile 2012. As I am still in the process of assimilating all of my new iLearning from Mobile 2012, yesterday was the first time I had to explore the script and the possibilities of grading Google forms.

Since Google forms can be accessed and completed via mobile devices or computers, the tool is a versatile and powerful assessment piece. Wanting to test out my other new tool, Snapguide…I decided to create a Snapguide step-by-step tutorial to walk users through setting up the Flubaroo script. If videos are your learning style, (see the Flubaroo YouTube video tutorial).

How to Grade a Google Form

 


01 Apr 2012
Comments: 0

iClassify Triangles

Tasked to modify an existing paper-based lesson on classifying triangles to be more multimedia (and mobile) in nature, I chose to create two separate lessons:

Direct Instruction: If teachers wanted to include a direct teach piece, the following videos would serve the purpose.

 

Web 2.0/Computer:

  1. Student Task 1: Utilize the deck below to view the 7 mystery triangles. Check your understanding by flipping the card over to get the answer.
  2. Student Task 2: Draw a triangle to match the description for each of the mystery triangles using Paint or Smart Notebook Express (or a recording sheet).

 

 
 
iPad:

  1. Student Task 1: Access the Mystery Triangle deck using an iDevice and the Flashcards* app:
    1. Launch Flashcardlet app.
    2. Tap Flashcards.
    3. Tap + sign in upper right hand corner to Download from Quizlet.
    4. Tap in the search space.
    5. Type “Techchef4u”.
    6. Tap Creator and tap Search.
    7. Select Mystery Triangle Exercise.
    8. Tap Add to Library.
    9. Tap Cancel and tap Library to return to your personal Flashcard library.
    10. Tap to select Mystery Triangle Exercise to review deck.
    11. Tap Study and start studying.
    12. Review all 7 cards in the deck: swipe to go to the next card and tap on a card to see the back of the card.
  2. Student Task 2: Draw a triangle to match the description for each of the mystery triangles using Popplet Lite, iPen Free, or or Xnote.

 

 

Extensions:
  1. Have students create their own Quizlet deck for Mystery Quadrilaterals.
  2. Utilize Doodle Buddy, Story Lines for Schools, or TypeDrawing FREE to illustrate triangles.
  3. Have students make a talking triangle video for a specific triangle using Mad Lips.
  4. Have students create an instructional video to teach classifying triangles using ScreenChomp, Explain Everything, ShowMe, or Educreations. (See example Classifying Triangles video from Math Lambert).
  5. Have students create their own triangle song using SongifyVideo Star, or Videolicious.

 

See original Triangle Song and adaptation below: 

More iLessons:

  1. Math iLessons & Pinterest iPad Lessons

 


26 Mar 2012
Comments: 14

Integrating Infographics into the iClassroom

So TechChef4U has caught the Infographics Influenza! Being a bit of a Pinterest fanatic, I have found an easy way to support and feed my Infographics Habit. Continuing to stock pile Educational Infographics on my Pinterest board, I waited until I found an app-ortunity to share these resources with one of my teachers and create a delectable lesson. During my stint as an 8th Math tutor, I had a few of the teachers approach me about engaging math lessons that they could utilize with 8th Math after the STAAR test. I mentioned the topic of infographics and shared a few of the ones I had collected. Then I worked with one of the teachers in particular, Mrs. Simpson, to hash out the details.

Pinterest: Educational Infographics

 

Common Core Standards: Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears”

What is an Infographic? Before we continue… let’s define and explore the topic of “infographics” further. No need to recreate the wheel… Kathy Schrock has already blazed the trail and created an amazing Vimeo video on the topic.

8 Great Infographic Stations: Teacher could choose a different infographic (from the list of 120+) for each station or have all of the students use the same infographic for each station. Infographics can be accessed from computers or mobile devices (as most are just images and not flash-based). Note: The EDU Infographic Pinterest board has been curated and reviewed mostly via a mobile phone – please preview and preselect infographics prior to utilizing the resources with your students.

  1. Station 1: List 5-10 Observations or Trends for the Infographic.
    1. This could be accomplished with Todays MeetEdmodo, or Lino It  from a mobile device or computer.
  2. Station 2: Generate 2 Truths & a Lie for the Infographic (prompt parter or other groups to determine which statements are true and which ones are lies).
    1. This could be accomplished with Todays MeetEdmodo, or Lino It  from a mobile device or computer.
    2. Todays Meet (modification): use Todays Meet activity as an exit ticket, print the transcript from Todays Meet, use as a warm-up the next day. Students would choose 4-6 statements and prove/disprove them.
  3. Station 3: Create a Word Problem based on data provided in the infographic (pass your problem to a partner or other group to solve).
    1. Word Problems could be created with a basic voice recording app or apps like Talking Tom & Ben, Puppet Pals, Sock Puppets, QR Code Beamer, Mad Lips, Comic Touch Lite, etc…
    2. Word Problems could be created with Web 2.0 tools like Make Belief Comix and Voki.
  4. Station 4: Answer Specific Questions on the Infographic (teacher could create a task or recording sheet for a specific infographic prior to that day.)
    1. Based on the trend and data given, make predictions or conclusions.
    2. Determine validity of statements.
    3. Teacher could generate multiple True/False Statements (prior to class) and have students prove/disprove them (some could require calculation).
    4. Create a Data table for one of the graphs.
    5. Calculate Central tendency for the data.
    6. Determine what the population of interest is.
    7. Locate bias in the infographic.
  5. Station 5: Determine how the information could be misused by supporting two separate arguments with the same graph, data set, or infographic.
  6. Station 6: Write a story about a person that the population describes or Create a Popplet to illustrate an individual from the population sample (similar to Visual.ly Twitterize).
  7. Station 7: Create a sample poll with questions that could have been asked to generate the infographic given? Then poll actual students in your classroom or at your campus and compare the data (use tools like Poll Everywhere, Edmodo, or  Google Forms – all 3 can be accessed from a mobile device and computer).
  8. Station 8: Determine data and questions for the infographic that you feel should have been included or would benefit the study.
Students Love Technology

Via: OnlineEducation.net

More Info/Resources on Teaching with Infographics 

  1. Kathy Schrock: Infographics as a Creative Assessment
  2. Data Visualizations & Infographics
  3. Project 3 Infographics: Ideas for using infographics across core curriculum.
  4. Data Visualized: More on Teaching with Infographics
  5. Where the Classroom Ends: Great ideas on using infographics to teach explicit/implicit arguments and utilize animated infographics.
  6. 10 Awesome Free Tools to Make Infographics

04 Jan 2012
Comments: 2

Glogster Learning Stations & iHybrids

Asked to develop a technology-integrated lesson for 5th Math, I naturally leaned to using the iPad. However, the lesson is being developed as a district resource and not every campus has iPads or iPods. Thus, I created a hybrid lesson. Since the elementary math specialists already had a bank of word problems that they had used in a “Words to Symbols” matching activity, we only had to spruce up some of the text and make it applicable or relevant to the apps we planned on using.

Glogster Learning Station: 5th Math - Patterns, Relationships, & Algebraic Thinking

 

The resources:

  1. Word Problem Videos: Each word problem was created with apps (e.g. Talking Pierre, Talking WeeMee, Talking Ben, and Puppet Pals). These videos were then emailed from my iPad and uploaded to Glogster EDU.
  2. Recording Sheet: The recording sheet was created in Word and dropped into my public Dropbox folder which generates a unique URL which will allow anyone to access the document (as there is no feature to upload documents in the free version of Glogster EDU).
  3. Glogster Learning Station: The Glogster Learning Station is great and visually appealing way to house all of your resources for students to access during the learning activity. Within the learning station, I included teacher’s notes, student directions, the word problem videos (and text translation), and a screenshot of the recording sheet that hyperlinks to the actual sheet (available to download), and an extra activity (that could serve as an additional assessment).

 

While this is a teacher-created station, the idea is so simple that students could create their own learning centers or create resources for a classroom learning station (as featured by Ms. Carnazzo’s class). Her class worked in small groups to create content to teach facts about government.

Class Glogster Learning Station: 2nd Grade Government Facts

 

The beauty utilizing Glogster EDU as a learning station (see more Glogster Learning Station resources) is that it frees up the teacher from disseminating directions and materials and it frees up devices in the classroom. Many classrooms only have one iPad (or a handful) and a few computer stations accessible to their students. By using the hybrid model, students can visit the Glogster station and then use other tools to complete an extension or remediation (e.g. two or three groups of students are working at Glogster learning stations, one group may be creating their word problem video or Khan-esque explanation using an iDevice and/or Document camera, and another group could be using the SMART board notebook lesson (or laminated cards) to match word problems with equations). This is also a great idea for differentiated instruction.

How times have changed…I created the following learning station glog (“Don’t Underestimate Yourself”) for middle school mathematics less than two years ago and the video resources took me nearly all day to edit and prepare… on a PC. With the flux of mobile devices and the ease of media production on these devices, I was able to knock out the video resources for the equations glog in less than an hour (and that was only due to the fact that I am a bit of a perfectionist).

Glogster Learning Station: Secondary Geometry & Spatial Reasoning

 


03 Jan 2012
Comments: 3

Be a Narrative Champion 4 Your Students

While it is the new year, I would be remissed if I neglected to share this bit of tech cheer from Ms. Carnazzo. While this persuasive assignment is holiday themed, the idea of writing and reading with multiple media elements is an idea that can be used the whole year long. With a media production studio in her students’ hands, Ms. Carnazzo serves as a narrative champion for her second grade class.

The Task: Students completed a written reindeer application prior to recording with the VoiceThread app. While Ms. Carnazzo did mention that the app had some glitches, thankfully students were able to use the online web app to complete the rest of the assignment. I typically shy away from apps that require logins as creating multiple student credentials and signing in and out of the app can be cumbersome. However, I can see the benefit of creating a class login and being able to continue working online (away from a mobile device) if need be.

 

After being pumped up after Tech Forum, I had scribed a blog draft highlighting seven tenets from Dean Shareski’s Keynote “What Matters Now“. For one reason or another, I never posted it. Since then, I have come across multiple situations that support his seven tenets…and decided to highlight them in a series of blogs…each blog featuring one tenet.

What Matters Now: Shareski’s sixth item was “storytelling“…and the idea of reading and writing with media. In this day and age, a persuasive essay or biography does not have to be (and should not always be) a paper and pen assignment. Consider innovative ways to share a story: blogs, videos, podcasts, cartoons, animations, ePubs and ebooks, info graphics, slideshows, etc…

A Real World “Reindeer” Example: While Ben is not applying for a position as Santa’s reindeer, he is using the innovations of multimedia (Ben For Best Job Blog) to market himself as an ideal candidate for the job of his dreams. Consider using Web 2.0 tools and apps to provide students with the multimedia tools that they need be successful in an ever-changing social and global community.

Be a Narrative Champion for your Teachers: When I think of the classroom and teacher that I would want to teach and inspire my own two boys, I instantly think of Ms. Carnazzo. Her innovative lessons and purposeful and effective use of technology engage and empower her students to be media literate global learners and inspire others to follow in her footsteps. To that end, I have nominated Ms. Carnazzo for the National School Board Association’s “20 to Watch” Award.

Also check out “Digital Story-telling: A tutorial in 10 easy steps“!


melbet промокод мелбет зеркало