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03 Jan 2012
Comments: 3

Be a Narrative Champion 4 Your Students

While it is the new year, I would be remissed if I neglected to share this bit of tech cheer from Ms. Carnazzo. While this persuasive assignment is holiday themed, the idea of writing and reading with multiple media elements is an idea that can be used the whole year long. With a media production studio in her students’ hands, Ms. Carnazzo serves as a narrative champion for her second grade class.

The Task: Students completed a written reindeer application prior to recording with the VoiceThread app. While Ms. Carnazzo did mention that the app had some glitches, thankfully students were able to use the online web app to complete the rest of the assignment. I typically shy away from apps that require logins as creating multiple student credentials and signing in and out of the app can be cumbersome. However, I can see the benefit of creating a class login and being able to continue working online (away from a mobile device) if need be.

 

After being pumped up after Tech Forum, I had scribed a blog draft highlighting seven tenets from Dean Shareski’s Keynote “What Matters Now“. For one reason or another, I never posted it. Since then, I have come across multiple situations that support his seven tenets…and decided to highlight them in a series of blogs…each blog featuring one tenet.

What Matters Now: Shareski’s sixth item was “storytelling“…and the idea of reading and writing with media. In this day and age, a persuasive essay or biography does not have to be (and should not always be) a paper and pen assignment. Consider innovative ways to share a story: blogs, videos, podcasts, cartoons, animations, ePubs and ebooks, info graphics, slideshows, etc…

A Real World “Reindeer” Example: While Ben is not applying for a position as Santa’s reindeer, he is using the innovations of multimedia (Ben For Best Job Blog) to market himself as an ideal candidate for the job of his dreams. Consider using Web 2.0 tools and apps to provide students with the multimedia tools that they need be successful in an ever-changing social and global community.

Be a Narrative Champion for your Teachers: When I think of the classroom and teacher that I would want to teach and inspire my own two boys, I instantly think of Ms. Carnazzo. Her innovative lessons and purposeful and effective use of technology engage and empower her students to be media literate global learners and inspire others to follow in her footsteps. To that end, I have nominated Ms. Carnazzo for the National School Board Association’s “20 to Watch” Award.

Also check out “Digital Story-telling: A tutorial in 10 easy steps“!


18 Nov 2011
Comments: 2

Primarily iProbability

If you are looking for an elementary iPad lesson in the techchef4u kitchen, it was probably cooked up by the ingenious Chef Carnazzo. This probability iLesson is no different. Carnazzo and her second grade class used the app ScreenChomp (featured in “Screen-casting & Problem-solving 4 the Classroom“) as a culminating apptivity from a week of work on probability (e.g. “TEKS 2.11: Probability and statistics. (C) use data to describe events as more likely or less likely such as drawing a certain color crayon from a bag of seven red crayons and three green crayons.”)


Chef Carnazzo Cooks up iProbability

 

Here’s how she did it:

  1. Teacher Preparation: Ms. Carnazzo chose the background pics (clipart from MS Word) and imported them to Doodle Buddy.
  2. Student Choice: Students chose stickers in Doodle Buddy.
  3. Student Assessment: Students had to answer (in written form) teacher pre-generated questions in reference to their picture.
  4. Highly Engaging: Carnazzo originally created the apptivity for an intervention group and, of course, the rest of the class wanted to do the apptivity as well.
  5. Small Group: While Ms. Carnazzo was working with small groups to record their screen-cast, the rest of the class had completed independent practice assignments at their desk.
  6. Student Planning & Preparation: Students used the questions and their answers on the worksheet that Ms. Carnazzo had prepared to craft the narration for their screencast. Carnazzo found it was useful to do a couple of dry runs prior to hitting the record button.
  7. Student Reactions: Students loved the ScreenChomp final project. Carnazzo stated the students really liked the part where their drawings appeared on the screen in the final product.
  8. Other Applications: Carnazzo felt this tool had a lot of klout in the classroom as students do so much problem-solving in math. She plans on using it in the future to have students record and compare different solution strategies to a single problem.

 

Sample other iCreations from the Carnazzo Kitchen: Grammar & Literacy with Tacky Wales, short vowel sounds with Songify, Math fact families with Talking Tom and friends, classifying motion with iCardSort, integrating Math and literacy using Puppet Pals Director’s Pass

 


30 Oct 2011
Comments: 0

"Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery"

Last week I received an email from Donita O’Hair of Frisco ISD. She sent me a very sweet note: “Hi Lisa, I love your site and have gotton so many great ideas! Someone sent it to me that got it from a workshop. I hope you don’t mind… I used the teachers idea (Ms. Carnazzo’s original) for the sums of 10 activity and redid it. I just had a 5th grade student recreate an example for me.”
 

Ms. Carnazzo's Sums of 10

Mrs. O’Hair cooked up her version of the “sums of ten” video with a teacher task intro and blended it with iMovie. She also mentioned she shared a few techchef4u sock puppet examples via QR codes. She stated they are just getting started with iPads at Borchardt – they have approximately 60 iPads and 75 iTouches.

I am always pleased to find that teachers and technology specialists are using the resources that I and/or other guest chefs cook up. My main reason for blogging is to provide anyone with a healthy app-etite… a tech cuisine that can be consumed and adapted.

Please note that all resources on the site are copyrighted “©2011. Lisa Johnson. All rights reserved. Permission to reproduce materials for classroom use granted.”

 

While permission to reproduce is granted and attribution is not required, I do appreciate attribution in apptivities that are adapted. Mrs. O’Hair included a statement “adapted from an original techchef4u post” in the video notes of her adaptation of sums of 10.

Mrs. O’Hair has also been so kind to share some of her previous and upcoming apptivities and iLessons from her district. I am truly thrilled to collaborate and see what others cook up. Looking forward to a medley of inspiration, collaboration, and technology integration.

Surprisingly Educational Apps: Check out “Surprisingly Educational Apps” – the show that served as inspiration for how Talking Tom and friends could be used instructionaly. (We are now available in iTunes – search directly for “appy hours 4 u” or “techchef4u”)

 


25 Oct 2011
Comments: 0

Tacky Wales: iTool for Literacy

If you follow my blog, you will know that Ms. Carnazzo has quite the iLesson toolkit (e.g short vowel sounds with Songify, Math fact families with Talking Tom and friends, classifying motion with iCardSort, and integrating Math and literacy using Puppet Pals Director’s Pass) for utilizing one iPad in her elementary classroom.

Tacky Wales Student Products


 
Her latest project utilized the paid app Tacky Wales: Create Your Own Story (thanks to a donation from the app developer for the promo code). In Language Arts, Ms. Carnazzos’ class has been working on parts of speech (mainly nouns and a sprinkling of verbs and adjectives).

Tacky Wales Student Products


 
Ms. Carnazzo’s model for executing this iLesson is well thought out and flawlessly planned:

  1. Setting the Stage: Before tackling the Tacky Wales project, students worked in collaborative groups to generate lists of words that fit into these categories (e.g. nouns, verbs, adjectives) as a reference.
  2. Modeling  & Guided Practice: She did one story with the whole class as an intro.
  3. Preview & Preselect Content: She then gave students a list of appropriate stories (topic and age-appropriate for second graders as some titles may be more adult-oriented) to choose from.
  4. Student Input: They voted and chose a title for their group.
  5. Facilitating  Student Efforts: Donette Sis (an Instructional Technology Coordinator) and Jennifer Heine (an Instructional Technology Specialist) came to the class with their iPads to help work with the small groups in completing their selected story. Teachers helped groups choose and input their words into the story framework.
  6. Extensions & Engagement: After completing and reading/enjoying the original story, students shook the iPad to Spoonerize (note: be aware that some spoonerisms may not be age-appropriate – consider re-shaking if you encounter this issue)…which of course they found quite hilarious!
  7. Presentation & Public Speaking: The next day students shared all their stories with the whole class.
  8. Cross-curricular Integration: Each group illustrated the setting of their own story. The importance of the story element, setting, is an integral focus for Reading.
 

Tacky Wales Student Products


 
Hungry for More?: Check out Words 4 Students for a list of free mad lib-like apps and suggestions for how they can be used in the classroom.

 

Thanks Tacky Wales for featuring  Ms. Carnazzo’s lesson on your site!

 


03 Oct 2011
Comments: 1

Words 4 Students: Episode 4

This is a supplement to “Appy Hours 4 You” Blog Talk Radio Show: Episode 4 – “Words 4 Students”. In this episode, we discussed up front how mad lib-like apps could be used instructionally with various content areas and grade levels and then discussed the main features of each app and what features were available as in-app purchases. (Also check out Teachervision for some great integration ideas.)

We also congratulated Ms. Carnazzo, a 2nd grade teacher in NEISD, for using our show to inspire and develop iLessons with her students: Talking Heads sums of 10 (from episode 1), Songify for short vowel sounds (from episode 1), and iCardSort for objects in motion (from episode 5).

Words 4 Students: features sorted w/ iCardSort app

This week we discussed the following free apps:

  1. Mad Libs (Website): Other paid versions: Goofy, Cool, and  On the Road. They also have Musical Mad Libs Songatron Free & Songatron $ which we haven’t had a chance to review.
  2. Tacky Wales: Also check out the paid app Tacky Wales Create.
  3. Wordventure (Website)
  4. Radlibz $
  5. Sparklefish (Twitter): Stay tuned for a holiday version.
 

Stream this week’s episode or download it in iTunes:

Listen to
internet radio with Techchef4u on Blog Talk Radio

27 Sep 2011
Comments: 6

Double Your Learning! Double Your Fun!

 

Carnazzos' Class: Two of Everything

Ms. Carnazzosclass is back at it again – integrating the iPad into innovative learning experiences. Thanks to a gracious donation from the app developer of Puppet Pals’s Director’s Pass, her class received a promo code for the full version including all of the characters and backgrounds as well as the ability to create your own characters and backgrounds.

In Math, Ms. Carnazzos’ class read the book “Two of Everything” by Lily Toy Hong. The story describes a magic pot that doubles everything that is put inside it.

Using her class iPad, Ms. Carnazzo achieved the trifecta of integration melding literacy, mathematics, and technology into this wonderfully crafted iLesson.

 

 

Here’s how she did it:

Two of Everything

  1. Students worked in cooperative groups of 4. They decided together what their number sentence would be and what object they would put into the pot. Then they each had to solve and explain their strategy on paper.
  2. Each group met with Ms. Canazzo to solidify their story plot.
  3. After the initial teacher conference, students got to choose their setting and each student chose a character. (This helped the group decide who would have what lines.)
  4. Students practiced their lines on their own and with Ms. Carnazzo a few times. Then they recorded their final show. (This process took 3 or 4 times to get it right due to…. forgotten lines, background noise, voice recording being too soft, trouble moving their character while they spoke right into the mic on the ipad.)
  5. While a small group was recording, the large group worked on math stations or independent work as the room needed to be quiet for recording.

 

Carnazzos' Class: Two of Everything

Additional Notes: The picture of the pot came from a website that housed a bank of teacher lessons. While the students did not complete an official storyboard (just ran through the dialogue a few times), Ms. Carnazzo suggested that it might help with the flow (… though she did prefer the less scripted quality where it sounds like the students are just talking and not reading lines.) “Two of Everything” Extension.

Extensions & Ideas: If you would like to create a lesson like this or need further suggestions for how to integrate Puppet Pals into your classroom (at any grade level and with any content area)… check out this full Puppet Pals iLesson post.

 


15 Sep 2011
Comments: 1

Clever Carnazzo's Cards

Meritorious Motion

Appy Alliteration: With an affinity for alliteration and all things Apple, I set out to congratulate Carnazzo on her creative use of cards with her class. Julio Barros, the iCardSort app developer, was kind enough to send us a few priceless promo codes for the full incredible iCardSort version. I forwarded one of these codes to Ms. Carnazzo in recognition for her savvy use of Songify and received another c-app-tivating lesson:

Meritorious Motion: Her class had been studying motion in science and had recently completed an empirical experiment to see which type of motion different items would show. After students completed the appropriate activity, she used iCardSort to group items to see what properties (e.f. bounce, spin, slide, roll) items in each group had in common. Students wanted to show that some items could be cleverly classified in more than one group so some are on the lines overlapping 2 groups. Students then brilliantly brainstormed other items that they thought would fit in the different groups. The pretty bright pink cards are their additional ideas.

 

If you are interested in replicating this lesson with your studious students, visit the iCardSort public decks in the next few days for the deck.

Noteworthy Newsletter: Also check out E-string‘s noteworthy newsletter which includes the original techchef4u HOTS Math Vocabulary lesson and some app-tastic Vimeo videos that highlight how to use iCardSort and how the app can be used in a lovely literature circle.

 

 

 


12 Sep 2011
Comments: 0

Carnazzo's Class Creations

Sums of 10 with Talking Heads

One of the most fulfilling parts of my jobs is to know that the technology recipes I create and present in my techchef4u blog are not only well-received but utilized to impact student learning. Ms. Carnazzo, a second grade teacher at Longs Creek in NEISD, has been such a wonderful inspiration for showcasing how these recipes can be used in an elementary classroom. It was a little over a week ago that I received her first email highlighting how she used Songify with her second grade class to practice short vowel sounds. This morning I received yet another email with a link to a “sums of 10” project she had her students complete with the free versions of the talking heads apps. Needless to say, if she keeps concocting these app-tastic lessons, I may just have to create a section for her on my blog entitled: Carnazzo’s Class Creations.

Carnazzo's Class Creation

Intrigued, I wanted to gain a little more insight in to her classroom and project management for the device. With only one iPad for her classroom, here is how she structured her latest creation:

  1. Students worked with a partner. They were given time to practice their portion prior to recording.
  2. While Ms. Carnazzo worked with the partners in a “quiet spot” to record their individual songs, the large group was playing a Tens Go Fish game
  3. When recording, one student would sing the first part and the other student would sing the response
  4. After all of the students had recorded, Ms. Carnazzo emailed the videos to herself and compiled them in iMovie to create one complete song.

 

While the students LOVE using the iPad any time, they are so proud of their products and always want to know when they will be posted online to share with their parents. What an app-laudable way to keep parents informed and to highlight student products while integrating technology to impact student learning!

Thanks to a generous PuppetPals Director’s Pass code donation, Ms. Carnazzo’s class (and a few others in the district) will be concocting a puppet show creation in the near future. Stay tuned for app-erific greatness!

The apps discussed here were highlighted in our

“appy hour 4 u”: surprisingly educational apps show.


05 Sep 2011
Comments: 1

Give Your Classroom a Voice with Songify

Appy Hours 4 You: As I mentioned in my Fakebook post, my passion is locating, assembling, and creating resources and lesson ideas to support existing technology (whether it be Web 2.0 tools or iPads). Starting our blog talk radio show was one more way that I wanted to support teachers in the district. While we offer multiple face-to-face courses for the iPad, I still have many teachers ask me what you can do with the device. Even a list of suggested apps can be cumbersome if teachers don’t have a goody bag of ideas to accompany the app or an explanation of how products can be removed from the app or device (e.g. emailed, synced from the photo roll, uploaded to Youtube, downloaded from a random url, etc…).

Thus the reason I felt such a calling to create our “appy hours 4 you” talk show and the portable format. While the show does air live, the intent was for it to be streamed later in the day (e.g. during lunch or while folding laundry at home later that evening) or downloaded to iTunes and listened to on the way to work or at the doctor’s office. Lesson to Go… if you will. Supporting our intent to create a portable learning tool, the vast majority of our listens have been to archived shows. As I do not have information as to the actual listeners of the show (just how many have listened), I am always curious as to who the users are and what they have done with the information shared.

2nd Grade Songify Project

 

Where is Short U? created with Songify

Songify: On Friday, I had to look no further than my inbox. I received a enthusiastic email from Ms. Carnazzo, a second grade teacher in the district, who had been using my blog resources throughout the summer. This was her first year to have an iPad in her classroom and she wanted to share her Songify class project with me. Overjoyed, I clicked on the link she sent me and found a beautiful Glogster EDU page with pictures of the students (she had full internet permissions for each child) decked out in colorful boas and sunglasses posing with a microphone and their iPad. As if that wasn’t adorable enough, she had five different short vowel songs posted (with a text box above each for the lyrics). Each of the songs were created by recording the students singing using Songify (one of the apps we highlighted in our first episode).

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What’s Next for our Appolicious Elementary Stars and their Teacher? Not only did the students love the project, Ms. Carnazzo has decided to have students complete a similar project with Talking Tom and a math song. As she wants the song to be one piece, she has decided to record each excerpt separately and then piece them together in a video editing tool like iMovie.

As my intention for the radio show was to instruct, inspire, and instill an autonomy for building lessons with the iPad that supports student learning and engagement, I would love to hear from others who have used or adapted the lesson ideas we have shared on our show.

Please email or comment with your lesson summary and apps used.