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21 Feb 2012
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iVocabulary

Earlier in the year, I spent a few hours planning with Mrs. Deforrest (a secondary ELAR specialist). She shared with me this fantastic resource she had created for her teachers. It was a deck of brightly colored cards on a keyring. Each card had a vocabulary instruction strategy ranging from a Frayer model to a Word Analysis Chart. I instantly perused the deck and started assigning an app to each strategy. Pondering what the best iOS method would be to deliver this new tool, I set this post aside for a few weeks. My intention was to provide teachers with a quick reference iVocabulary Toolkit of apps they could use to teach and support vocabulary instruction in a variety of ways while modeling a tool (flashcards) that could be used in a myriad of settings.

 

Teacher: The simplest way to disseminate one deck of cards to multiple students (on campus devices or their own personal devices) is to create a deck using the online version of Quizlet. Users can create unlimited decks with a free Quizlet account.
  1. Teacher Username: As students will be searching by their teacher’s username to locate the deck, I would recommend creating a username that is short and simple.
  2. Deck Visibility: If you are creating the deck with the intention of making it accessible to your students, make sure you select the option “visible to everyone”.
  3. Images: If you would like to include images in your decks, upgrade to Quizlet Plus for $15/year and unlock the ability to upload your own images or import from Flickr.
  4. Deck Accessibility (Computers): If you are in a classroom with computers or if you have access to a lab, you can grab the embed code for the deck and paste it on to your teacher or class website for students to study and review.
  5. Deck Accessibility (Mobile Devices): If your class has access to mobile devices, review the directions below using the app Flashcardlet (Flashcards*) to access the sample iVocabulary deck(s).
    1. iPhone/iPod Mobility: iPhone/iPod Apps that interface w/ Quizlet
    2. iPad Mobility: iPad Apps that interface w/ Quizlet

 

Easily Create Quizlet Decks


Student: While these are the directions for accessing the iVocabulary deck, the same directions could be used for locating a teacher-created deck.

    1. Launch Flashcardlet app.
    2. Tap Flashcards.
    3. Tap + sign in upper right hand corner to Download from Quizlet.
    4. Tap in the search space.
    5. Type “Techchef4u”.
    6. Tap Creator and tap Search.
    7. Select iVocabulary.
    8. Tap Add to Library.
    9. Tap Cancel and tap Library to return to your personal Flashcard library.
    10. Tap to select iVocabulary to review deck.
    11. Tap Study and start studying.
    12. Review all 5 cards in the deck: swipe to go to the next card and tap on a card to see the back of the card.

 

iDeas for Integrating Flashcards into the iClassroom (from “appy hours 4 U” episode – “Notable Apps 4 Note-Taking“:

  1. Students could create their own decks of cards within the app to take notes or study.
  2. Teachers could disseminate information or task instructions using decks (e.g. roles for a project, use all of these words in a sentence, writing prompts, math word problems with answers on back to self-check).
  3. Teachers could create decks for students that could be utilized to flip the classroom (providing instruction at home) and allow students access to vocabulary or notes anywhere/anytime they have access to a computer or a mobile device. (Decks can also be printed).
  4. Individualized Instruction: the decks lends themselves to indivualized instruction as students can filter cards, mark a card as mastered, and study in a variety of ways (e.g. show back first, show progress, shuffle cards, etc…)

20 Feb 2012
Comments: 0

Tooning iN to History

I had the pleasure of observing Mrs. Lair’s Regular Reading class this past Friday at Ed White Middle School. She had mentioned that she was using the Toontastic app (which oftentimes goes on sale for FREE) to have students create their own fairy tale or toon version similar to the plight and struggle of the Freedom Riders to illustrate the conflict and resolution between two entities. I loved the cross-curricular integration.

Mrs. Lair provided students with a paper copy of the Toontastic Storyboard template she had created to complete prior to using the iPad. It mimicked the 5 sections of Toontastic’s Story Arc (Setup, Conflict, Challenge, Climax, and Resolution). She also included a statement about each of the scenes:

  1. Setup: only sets up the setting and introduces the character
  2. Conflict: Introduces the problem
  3. Challenge: Problem is in the works (action)
  4. Climax: The height of the story
  5. Resolution: How has the problem been resolved? (How does the story end?)

 

Toontastic Storyboard


 
Supports Differentiated Instruction: Beyond the project itself, I was pleased to see how the app itself supported differentiated instruction and multiple learning styles. Within the story arc framework, students could add another conflict or rearrange the current elements. Students also had the choice between multiple characters and settings as well as the option to create their own characters and backgrounds. Some students chose to use the default characters, others drew their own sets, and others customized the existing characters. Some students chose to use mood music and sound effects to illustrate tone and others selected specific characters and colors to represent an emotion.

Sharing/Publishing/Evaluating Student Products: While there is no way to publish without setting up an account, students did save their projects within the app. To work around the publishing issue, Mrs. Lair decided to have students do a gallery walk and will provide each student with a rubric to assess each of the project as they walk around the room.

Check out these iLessons.

 


18 Feb 2012
Comments: 2

Tis the Season for iLearning

I have had the pleasure of sharing many of Ms. Carnazzo’s creations in the techchef4u kitchen and thought it was about time I took a trip to her classroom. Yolanda and I had the opportunity to observe Carnazzo in action and assist a group in completing their Seasons project. The weather that day was quite fitting as neither one of us were dressed nor prepared for the torrential downpour.

The first thing I noticed was her classroom management. All students were on task, at a level 0, and were working on the assignment that they were expected to complete. Before the activity, Ms. Carnazzo (2nd grade teacher) reviewed the task and the CHAMP’s Expectations for student behavior. Then students were then split up into 4 groups. One group worked with Ms. Carnazzo on the carpet finalizing their script and storyboard while the others worked quietly at their desks doing independent work. Each group was responsible for a different season.

Carnazzo's iClassroom

 

Science 2.8B: Identify the importance of weather and seasonal information to make choices in clothing, activities and transportation.

Beforehand: Before we arrived, small groups had researched info on their season using BrinpopJr videos and the Science text to describe their seasons citing the following elements:

  1. Typical weather/temperature
  2. Types of clothing to wear
  3. Activities appropriate for that weather
  4. Kinds of transportation they might use (e.g. to get to school)

 
Groups had also discussed and written ideas for their Puppet Pals video using the provided Storyboard template. Ms. Carnazzo had pre-selected a seasonal image background from both Puppet Pals Director’s Pass app and Doodle Buddy’s background gallery.

During Class: Small groups worked with the teacher (and Yolanda and myself) to:

  1. Finalize their Puppet Pals ideas
  2. Practice their presentations without actually recording (took several run-throughs)
  3. Record their video (as time permits)
  4.  

Logistics: Groups not working with a teacher had another weather activity to work on quietly at their desk. In working with a group first-hand I discovered a few things:

  1. You can only practice the script a couple of times before the students start losing interest. I found the best course of action was to practice once or twice with the script, record a rough draft, listen to it, and record one more, and then choose the best of the two.
  2. Passing around the script and the iPad causes a bit of background noise. I found if I held the iPad and handed it to each child when it was their time to speak, some of the noise of moving the iPad was reduced.
  3. The Puppet Pals video file is too large to email. Since the students recorded their show on my device and not Ms. Carnazzo’s, I had one of two options: upload to YouTube as a private file and then download from there, or pull it off when I synced my device at home.

 

Carnazzo's Season's Student Projects


 
If you are interested in how to manage an iClassroom or how to purposefully integrate 1 iPad in to a classroom, tune in Thursday March 1st at 3:30pm as the famous Lisa Carnazzo will be our guest “The 1 iPad Classroom“. If you missed the live show, check it out in iTunes the next day.