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14 Dec 2012
Comments: 3

Vocabulary iCues: Trading Cards

I have been a huge fan of Read Write Think’s interactives for some time. Naturally, I was ecstatic when they started releasing app versions of them. One of my favorites is the FREE Trading Card app. The app allows for multiple student logins (which is perfect for classrooms using a shared iClassroom model) and boasts 7 different templates (fictional person, real person, fictional place, real place, object, event, and vocabulary.) Naturally, one can see the potential for this app across the curriculum and with multiple grade levels.

Trading Cards app

 

Vocabulary Bulletin Board

Vocabulary Connections: One of my English teachers here at Hill Country MS, Dixie McGrath, used this app with her students to demonstrate their knowledge of the week’s vocabulary. While this can obviously be achieved with other mediums (see visual cue cards on the bulletin board to the right), this app provides an easy template with further vocabulary connections (e.g. definition, part of speech, synonym, antonym, other word associations and clues, where it would be used in everyday life as well as people who might use it, and personal connections). The completed card can also can be saved to a photo roll to be shared with other students or collected to create a class set.

 Below are a few student examples:

 

WME050 - Student Created Books in the iClassroom

600+  iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

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Contact TechChef4u: lisa.johnson@techchef4u.com

 
Ted X Youth Austin 3/30/2012!

Come visit me at FETC. I will be presenting a 3 hour workshop on Monday entitled “Student Created Books in the iClassroom.”


24 Feb 2012
Comments: 0

Math-tastic iVocabulary

After taking a look at the 8th Math Benchmark Exam and perusing the student data, a few things became abundantly clear: Much of the test involved vocabulary AND successful problem-solving was based on the knowledge of that vocabulary and the ability to assimilate the given terms and information in order to draw an object, produce a table, or complete a graph.

While this is not really a shocking revelation (especially to those who teach Math as I did), I instantly began thinking of apps that could support math vocabulary in engaging ways.

All of our Math classrooms at Ed White have access to a class set of iPods. Thus, I focused on three FREE iPod apps that could be used in small groups and stations.

Doodle Buddy: The Math Facilitator had mentioned an activity where students work in pairs. One student would have a vocabulary word (e.g. isosceles right triangle) and the other student would have a dry erase board. Student 1 would be provided with a word and a sample drawing/representation or definition for that word. Student 2 would then draw the word without looking at the representation. Students would take turns reading and drawing.

  1. iPodsibility: Student 1 would use teacher-created Quizlet vocabulary deck imported into Flashcards* app to provide the words and definitions (pictures can be included in the deck for $15/year). Student 2 would then draw the figure using Doodle Buddy (with Dots & Boxes background). Doodle Buddy app can be shaken to clear the board for the next object much like an etch-a-sketch. (More iClassroom Examples of Doodle Buddy: Apps for the Classroom & Techchef4u.)
 

Doodle Buddy

 

StoryLines for Schools: This is a surprisingly educational app and a modern day app-ification of the telephone game! The classroom application would be vocabulary.

StoryLines for Schools: Student 2 View

 

  1. iPodsibility (1 iPod): Students could work in small groups of 3 with 1 iPod. Using 1 iPod: Student 1 would type in the definition of a word (e.g. “a triangle with two equal sides”) and then pass the device to student 2. Student 2 would draw an example of this definition and then pass the device to student 3. Student 3 would then write the word that is associated with the picture (they would not see the definition).
  2. iPodsibility (3 iPods): This idea is very similar to using 1 iPod but each student would enter in a definition and then pass the device. Thus, there would actually be three vocabulary words going around at the same time.

 

StoryLines for Schools: Student 3 View

 

TypeDrawing Free: This app allows students to draw with words and is perfect for illustrating vocabulary in a beautifully graphic and memorable visualization.

  1. iPodsibility: This would be best executed at a station or with individual students. The idea would be to think of all of the components and words that make up a shape. For example, the following words could be associated with an isosceles right triangle: leg, right angle, height, base, hypotenuse, acute angle, triangle, etc… Students would generate a list of vocabulary words (on a sheet of paper or in the Notes app). These words would then be used to describe a shape and then illustrate the shape given those words.

 

TypeDrawing Free

 

 Hungry for more Math lessons, check out these

 


28 Jan 2012
Comments: 1

Paperless Passages with PaperPort

Our ELA and ELL teachers were scheduled to conduct a Super Saturday session for ELL students. They had requested that I support them with some apptivities that would focus on unfamiliar vocabulary. The passage (written by Mr. Wayment) was originally included as a handout. I simply converted the document to a PDF, gave it a public URL in Dropbox, and suggested it be completed in an app like Neu.Annotate PDF or PaperPort Notes. Not only does integrating the iPad provide the teachers with an engaging paperless lesson, apps like PaperPort Notes also provide a way for students to provide responses both in written and auditory form. Consider having students answer the following question “Do you think it was right or wrong for the people at the wake to laugh about things that Mr. Ortiz had said and done?” using the voice recording feature.

Annotate your PDF's in PaperPort Notes and include a Voice Message

 

Follow-up activity: This involved students illustrating their own “common words (see page 17 & 18)” vocabulary word from the list. This would include the word, a definition of the word, using the word in a sentence, and a visual representation of the word. The visual could be a picture of the student portraying the word (if the classroom has an iPad 2) or a hand-drawn illustration in an app like Doodle Buddy. Students had the choice of the following words (howl, wail, cry, moan, sob, chuckle, snicker, giggle, guffaw, and explode with laughter). The final product would be assembled in Popplet Lite. An extension could be using Popplet Lite to place each of the words on a spectrum of intensity (e.g. howl to explode with laughter). Also visit Taxonomy of Ideas for a framework. 

Illustrating Vocabulary with Popplet Lite

 

Check out other iLessons and iResources with Neu.Annotate PDF and Popplet Lite.


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