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21 Feb 2012
Comments: 0

iVocabulary

Earlier in the year, I spent a few hours planning with Mrs. Deforrest (a secondary ELAR specialist). She shared with me this fantastic resource she had created for her teachers. It was a deck of brightly colored cards on a keyring. Each card had a vocabulary instruction strategy ranging from a Frayer model to a Word Analysis Chart. I instantly perused the deck and started assigning an app to each strategy. Pondering what the best iOS method would be to deliver this new tool, I set this post aside for a few weeks. My intention was to provide teachers with a quick reference iVocabulary Toolkit of apps they could use to teach and support vocabulary instruction in a variety of ways while modeling a tool (flashcards) that could be used in a myriad of settings.

 

Teacher: The simplest way to disseminate one deck of cards to multiple students (on campus devices or their own personal devices) is to create a deck using the online version of Quizlet. Users can create unlimited decks with a free Quizlet account.
  1. Teacher Username: As students will be searching by their teacher’s username to locate the deck, I would recommend creating a username that is short and simple.
  2. Deck Visibility: If you are creating the deck with the intention of making it accessible to your students, make sure you select the option “visible to everyone”.
  3. Images: If you would like to include images in your decks, upgrade to Quizlet Plus for $15/year and unlock the ability to upload your own images or import from Flickr.
  4. Deck Accessibility (Computers): If you are in a classroom with computers or if you have access to a lab, you can grab the embed code for the deck and paste it on to your teacher or class website for students to study and review.
  5. Deck Accessibility (Mobile Devices): If your class has access to mobile devices, review the directions below using the app Flashcardlet (Flashcards*) to access the sample iVocabulary deck(s).
    1. iPhone/iPod Mobility: iPhone/iPod Apps that interface w/ Quizlet
    2. iPad Mobility: iPad Apps that interface w/ Quizlet

 

Easily Create Quizlet Decks


Student: While these are the directions for accessing the iVocabulary deck, the same directions could be used for locating a teacher-created deck.

    1. Launch Flashcardlet app.
    2. Tap Flashcards.
    3. Tap + sign in upper right hand corner to Download from Quizlet.
    4. Tap in the search space.
    5. Type “Techchef4u”.
    6. Tap Creator and tap Search.
    7. Select iVocabulary.
    8. Tap Add to Library.
    9. Tap Cancel and tap Library to return to your personal Flashcard library.
    10. Tap to select iVocabulary to review deck.
    11. Tap Study and start studying.
    12. Review all 5 cards in the deck: swipe to go to the next card and tap on a card to see the back of the card.

 

iDeas for Integrating Flashcards into the iClassroom (from “appy hours 4 U” episode – “Notable Apps 4 Note-Taking“:

  1. Students could create their own decks of cards within the app to take notes or study.
  2. Teachers could disseminate information or task instructions using decks (e.g. roles for a project, use all of these words in a sentence, writing prompts, math word problems with answers on back to self-check).
  3. Teachers could create decks for students that could be utilized to flip the classroom (providing instruction at home) and allow students access to vocabulary or notes anywhere/anytime they have access to a computer or a mobile device. (Decks can also be printed).
  4. Individualized Instruction: the decks lends themselves to indivualized instruction as students can filter cards, mark a card as mastered, and study in a variety of ways (e.g. show back first, show progress, shuffle cards, etc…)

17 Feb 2012
Comments: 3

iSpy a Story

Tasked with the initiative to gather student products created from intra-district iPad Lessons, I sent out an email to my campuses that had multiple devices (see below).
 

Letter to My Campuses


 
Within a few minutes, I started receiving emails with student work attachments. Many times I have a specific idea or set of ideas for how an app can be used.
 

Blank Story Spine Template in app

Story Spine Teacher-Created Apptivity: It is always refreshing when I come across innovative and purposeful classroom integration ideas as the ones Ashley Solomon (8th grade ACL & Reading Workshop at Ed White Middle School) shared below using the app Story Spine:
  1. Grade Level: 7th grade
  2. Content Area: Reading Workshop
  3. Topic/Focus/TEKS: The focus was chronological order/sequence of events.
  4. Quick Summary of the Lesson: The book for this week was, “The Transcontinental Railroad.” I had them use the “Story Spine” app to write a story about the transcontinental railroad. I started them out with the first sentence, “Once upon a time many people traveled to California to search for gold.”
  5. Student Task or Product: They were responsible for finishing the story by looking for dates and keywords like, first, last, then, etc in their book. This was an independent activity. The product was their story.
  6. Teacher Notes: I asked them to email it to me and I printed them. I usually have 1 or 2 students volunteer to read their story. For my Reading Workshop kids, an activity like this would take about 30 minutes. So, it can be completed in one day.  I usually don’t print the same day so they won’t get to read their story until the following day.

 

Student Sample of Story Spine Project copied into Notes app


 
What really speaks testaments about this assignment above and beyond the purposeful use of technology and cross-curricular content integration is the fact that the students in her classes have not passed the Reading TAKS. Mrs. Solomon actively integrates the iPads at least three days a week to support and improve student literacy and reading comprehension and will be sharing further lessons over the next few weeks with the techchef4u diners. While she doesn’t believe any of them are “earth shattering”, I would have to disagree as I feel they present lots of app-tastic iPadsibilities. Another thing to note is that student engagement in her classroom is on the rise and paper waste is on the decline.
 
For more iPad Mad-Lib apptivities, check out these.


14 Nov 2011
Comments: 1

HOT Apps 4 Literacy: Episode 10

This is a supplement to “Appy Hours 4 You” Blog Talk Radio Show: Episode 10 – “HOT Apps 4 Literacy“. In this episode we featured multiple game-like apps that supported English Language Arts content for both elementary and secondary students. Our focus was on how these game apps could be used to create purposeful instructional apptivities (e.g. what a task card and recording sheet might look like and what examples of extensions and follow-up apptivities would be.)

This week we discussed the following free apps:

HOT Apps 4 Literacy

Elementary:

    1. Bluster!
    2. Chicktionary Lite
    3. Futaba Word Games for Kids
    4. Word-Blocks
    5. Grammer Jammers
    6. Grammar Fun Free
    7. Story Wheel
    8. Grammar Dragon
    9. K12 Timed Reading Practice Lite

 

Secondary

    1. Same Meaning Magic (Synonyms)
    2. Word Bubble Free
    3. Vocabulary Bubble Free
    4. Poetry Magnets
    5. iAssociate 2 HD Lite

 

iModel with Explain Everything: I have used Explain Everything to model how an iLesson using Chicktionary Lite (or any ELA game app) could be delivered utilizing resources such as task cards, recording sheets, and follow-up activities. (Check out Laura Moore’s task card (Apptivity-Task-Card_Chicktionary) and recording sheet (Student-Recording-Sheet_Chicktionary) on her blog).

 

 

Stream this week’s episode or download it in iTunes directly. 

Listen to internet radio with Techchef4u on Blog Talk Radio

 

Yes, we are now available in iTunes (search for “appy hours 4 u” or “techchef4u”).


19 Oct 2011
Comments: 2

Quadfecta of Integration: Brainstorming, Goal-Setting, iPads, Collaboration

Mrs. DeForrest and I met up again this morning to cook up another delectable fusion. This time we decided to use iBrainstorm and goal-setting questions to create a collaborative gallery walk activity.

How does the selection and pursuit of goals affect a person’s life?

Students will complete the walk in both reading and english class (each class has a different set of questions) that day and the questions will be used to introduce the unit based on the essential question (in bold above).

Questions for Gallery Walk

 

Here’s the recipe for accomplishing this app-tivity:

  1. Teacher prepares 6 stations with an iPad at each:
    1. Each station is a different number – ranging from 1-6
    2. Each station will have a different question corresponding to that number (print out on large piece of paper and post above or at station)
    3. Teacher will add a new board to each iPad using iBrainstorm. Teacher will label the board according to the station it is placed in: Question  1- Question 6 (e.g. iPad 1 for Station 1 would have a board within iBrainstorm labeled “Question 1” )
    4. Teacher will prepare student task cards for each station (using student directions below)
    5. Teacher will assign each student in each class period to a colored group. There are 6 colored groups: yellow, blue, green, red, orange, purple.
    6. Teacher will assign a role or task to each student in the group (e.g. Scribe for Questions 1-2, Scribe for Questions 3-4, Scribe for Questions 5-6, Final Submitter, Timekeeper/TaskMaster/BoardMaster). Roles can be adjusted as group sizes will vary.
    7.  Teacher will post instructions for submitting final board including teacher email address visible in the room.

     

Gallery Walk Rotation: Colors Correspond with iBrainstorm Sticky Notes

     

  1. Student Directions:
    1. Report to their first station according to rotation schedule (see role/task assignments for Scribe)
      1. Double-tap on the board in iBrainstorm to add a sticky note
      2. Double-tap the sticky note to edit the color to change it to correspond to your group’s color
      3. Type in your answer to the question (may have several stickies for each question for each group)
      4. Tap the keyboard icon (in the far bottom right of your keyboard) or the cork board background to return back to your canvas
      5. Move stickies by pressing and dragging to group or pinch out to zoom in (if necessary)
    2. Report to second station according to rotation schedule and complete same process (see role/task assignments for Scribe)
    3. Report to third-sixth stations using same process and instructions
    4. At last station (after answers to final question have been posted on board), follow Final Submitter instructions:
      1. After last question is answered at last station, tap square with arrow in upper right hand corner of screen to submit
      2. Tap “Send in Email
      3. To: “Teacher email” you have been given (e.g. anyteacher@neisd.net)
      4. Subject: “Period#: Question #: Actual Question” (e.g. Period 2: Question 1: What is goal-setting?)
      5. In Body of Email: “Write group members names and color of group” (e.g. Purple Group: Stefan, Elena, Damen, Bonnie
      6. Tap “Send” (receive verification from teacher that board was received) – should also hear “whoosh” sound
    5. At last station, BoardMaster will shake iPad and select “Delete Everything
 

iBrainstorm: Gallery Walk Questions

Resources/References:

  1. Setting & Achieving Goals for Grades 5-9

 

Also check out these resources:
  1. Getting iN Touch with Vocabulary: iDevice Graphic Organizer Lesson
  2. Take A Chomp Out of Your Learning Goals: Screen-casting to express goals
  3. HOT Apps 4 Brainstorming: Free Brainstorming & Mind-Mapping Apps (reviews, lessons, and resources)
  4. Need Inspiration? Check out 100 Reasons to Mind Map

 

 


18 Oct 2011
Comments: 3

Getting iN Touch with Vocabulary

A fortunate happenstance allowed Mrs. Deforest (our ELAR Facilitator) and myself to land at Ed White Middle School on a day of benchmark testing. At first both of us considered rescheduling our visits but thankfully decided to work together on integrating technology into the upcoming 6th ACL unit instead.

What are some complexities involved in coming to an understanding of ourselves and others?

The essential question drove the activities and technology tools and resources that were assembled that day. Mrs. Deforest already had the videos and readings assembled and had ideas for the activity (e,g, graphic organizer, think/pair/share, gallery walk, Socratic circles, brainstorming, impromptu speech, etc…). I merely had to sprinkle some app-erific seasoning on a few of the dishes to really bring out their flavor…

Resource: One of the first weeks involved students watching a video from a student, Eve Shalen Krakowski, reflecting upon an experience she had in eighth grade:

App-tivity: After the video clip, students would be directed to discuss what it meant to be an “insider” or an “outsider“. As the ELAR department on campus had just received 60 iPads (divided into 3 carts with 20 in each) for classroom use, I wanted to choose a tool that could accomplish the task as well as lend itself as an ingredient to other dishes in the future. I felt iCardSort and a graphic organizer PDF to create a Frayer model would do the trick.

Holt Interactive Graphic Organizers: 38 Total

 

Here’s the recipe for accomplishing this app-tivity:

  1. Launch Safari on your iPad.
  2. Visit http://bit.ly/15hr8m (a bitly version for Holt Interactive Graphic Organizers)
  3. Create a webclip for the site:
    1. tap the box with the arrow on the right of the browser
    2. tap “add to home screen”
    3. save
  4. Launch the site from your new web clip
  5. Select the Web Diagram graphic organizer
  6. Take a screenshot:
    1. press home and off buttons at same time
    2. photo will be automatically saved to your photo roll
  7. Launch iCardSort app
  8. Select an option for delivery:
    1. Teacher creates and beams/blasts default deck: Teacher creates a default deck with labels (“insider”, “definition”, “examples”, “non-examples”, “characteristics”) and students import Frayer Model default deck
    2. Students create deck from scratch
  9. Set the background:
    1. Tap box with arrow on right
    2. Tap Settings/Background Images/Choose Saved Photo/Select Web Diagram
  10. Create a Frayer Model for the word “insider”
    1. Double Tap anywhere on background to create a new card
  11. Layer all cards (grouped so they touch) in each circle before you submit
  12. Email the deck to your teacher (will include 5 groups of text as well as image of model)
  13.  

iCardSort with Holt Interactive G.O. as background


 

Also check out these resources:
  1. Use neu.Annotate PDF free app to annotate PDF (with pens, highlighters, shapes, images, and text)
  2. Use Eduplace graphic organizers in addition to Holt
  3. HOT Apps 4 Brainstorming: Free Brainstorming & Mind-Mapping Apps (reviews, lessons, and resources)
  4. Need Inspiration? Check out 100 Reasons to Mind Map

17 Oct 2011
Comments: 1

Government vs. Puppets

I had the rare treat to sit in on an AP Government class today at Reagan H.S. (Christi Robinson, ITS for Reagan HS and Bush MS invited me to visit) and observe their court case project share-out. Thanks to Puppet Pals Director’s Pass donation, students were able to use the teacher’s iPad to create their own court case puppet show. Ms. Newton, the AP Government teacher, also allowed them to explore other submission venues (e.g. Sock Puppets app, Myths & Legends Story Creator, and video-taping their own sock puppet productions old-school style.)

When the class of 38 students was polled, we found that 37 of the 38 students had a personal iPod/iPhone/iPad mobile device. As I have seen many puppet products in elementary and middle school, it was a great experience for me to see how the same apps could be used in a high school setting. Worried that some of the students would find it childish or infantile, I was thoroughly thrilled to find out that not only did they love the apps… many of them downloaded the apps to their own devices and worked at home to complete the project.

“Students will understand the structure, functions, and powers of Congress, the legislative process, and its relationship the branch of government.”

Court Cases

The Task was to research a court case (they randomly drew one), storyboard their accounts (used the template in Pages), and create a video product that highlighted all of the specifics below:

  1. Name of Case  (and brief summary)
  2. Date
  3. Court Decision
  4. Constitutionality
  5. Impact

 

Since knowing and understand court cases is such an integral part of STAAR and AP exams, creating these shows is a useful and vital tool for students to learn the case as well as review the case before the test (as the majority of the videos were posted to Youtube by students for easy access). Another way to collect these resources for later review would be to use Videodropper and download the student videos to a class Dropbox that could be shared with all of the students and accessed from student devices.

 

In class, we came across the free Court Case app that provides a list of famous court cases and includes the opinion of the court, case citation, dissent, and syllabus. Wish we had found this app prior to the project. Alas, it will still be a good review before students take the exam.
Without further ado… will everyone rise? The honorable Judge Techchef4u will be highlighting these student-created court cases:
 

Miranda vs. Arizona (created with Sock Puppets)

Greg. vs. Georgia (created with Sock Puppets)


Board vs. Education (created with Puppet Pals)

Gibbons vs. Ogden (created with Sock Puppets)

Roe vs. Wade (created with Puppet Pals)

Suggestions & Strategies: As Christi and I sat in on the projects, we made a few notes on suggestions and strategies to use next semester when this project will be presented again:
  1. utilize the court cases app for research prior to storyboarding
  2. utilize T-Chart app to document and weight pros/cons (in this case arguments for the plaintiff and arguments for the defendant)
  3. set a time limit for the video
  4. consider using Videolicious for other video projects
  5. consider using characters to resemble the traits of real individuals in the case (as seen in Miranda vs. Arizona)
  6. use music to create mood and tone (as some students did)
  7. alter the pitch in some apps for students who have high-picthed
  8. create a common tag(s) in YouTube so that they can search later to review
  9. create a shared Dropbox to house the YouTube videos utilizing Videodropper (make sure you select optimize for iPhone/iPod)
  10. set up videos in stations (rather than present to the class as a whole), and have each student complete two circles of reflections for each case  they viewed. (e.g. how did the verdict of this court case directly affect….)

Original Source: Deeper Reading by Kelly Gallagher

 

Many thanks to Christi Robinson, Ms. Newton, and the students of AP Government at Reagan HS for sharing their projects and their class time with me. It is such a joy to see how technology can be seamlessly integrated to foster learning and support the curriculum.

Want More?. Check out other projects and lesson resources highlighting Sock Puppets & Puppet Pals app(s) as well as a follow-up post to this one which includes more student projects.

 

 


13 Oct 2011
Comments: 0

A Day in the Life of Elementary Flat Stanley

I have always loved Flat Stanley to promote literacy, story-telling, geography, and global awareness. I decided to use him to promote literacy and local tourism for a monthly mommy blog that I am a guest blogger for. The original idea was to give the gift of learning and technology integration to local moms and highlight local events and places around town…

Flat Stanley New Braunfels

 

…then I discovered that the Flat Stanley app was free and decided to work it into an iDevice and Web 2.0 lesson. Here are three ways to utilize Flat Stanley in your classroom:

  1. QR Codes for Education

    Flat Stanley on an iDevice: Take pictures around the campus and incorporate them into StoryRobe to create a video. The Flat Stanley app will allow students to take pictures in the app but will not save the pictures to the PhotoRoll. The best way I found to get the photos into the PhotoRoll is to email each photo to myself, open the emails on the device, and tap and hold the image to save to the device. Another option would be to email them to the teacher and have the teacher load them into iTunes and sync them manually. From there I imported the photos into StoryRobe (I found storyboarding the order of the images and the narration prior to recording was very useful) and record narration for each photo to compile a complete video.

  2. Flat Stanley & Web 2.0: If teachers do not have an iPod or iPad, they could have students create their own Flat Stanleys (see these printable templates: Flat Stanley Project & Flat Stanley Book Template), take pics of each around campus or in the classroom, and use Little Bird Tales to achieve a similar student product. (See Signs of Math example)
  3. Flat Stanley & QR Codes: Have students create their own Flat Stanleys and research a location for them to have adventures (research could be done on the computer through virtual trips or on the iPad using apps like ArounderTouch, Fotopedia Heritage, or Google Earth). From there, students can write a story, a letter, or a journal of Flat Stanley’s adventure and even create a podcast. Share your adventures with others by creating QR codes to information, videos, photos, or Google Maps locations from the places they visit. Print these out and place them next to student’s Flat Stanleys and set up a Flat Stanley Scavenger Hunt.

 


27 Sep 2011
Comments: 6

Double Your Learning! Double Your Fun!

 

Carnazzos' Class: Two of Everything

Ms. Carnazzosclass is back at it again – integrating the iPad into innovative learning experiences. Thanks to a gracious donation from the app developer of Puppet Pals’s Director’s Pass, her class received a promo code for the full version including all of the characters and backgrounds as well as the ability to create your own characters and backgrounds.

In Math, Ms. Carnazzos’ class read the book “Two of Everything” by Lily Toy Hong. The story describes a magic pot that doubles everything that is put inside it.

Using her class iPad, Ms. Carnazzo achieved the trifecta of integration melding literacy, mathematics, and technology into this wonderfully crafted iLesson.

 

 

Here’s how she did it:

Two of Everything

  1. Students worked in cooperative groups of 4. They decided together what their number sentence would be and what object they would put into the pot. Then they each had to solve and explain their strategy on paper.
  2. Each group met with Ms. Canazzo to solidify their story plot.
  3. After the initial teacher conference, students got to choose their setting and each student chose a character. (This helped the group decide who would have what lines.)
  4. Students practiced their lines on their own and with Ms. Carnazzo a few times. Then they recorded their final show. (This process took 3 or 4 times to get it right due to…. forgotten lines, background noise, voice recording being too soft, trouble moving their character while they spoke right into the mic on the ipad.)
  5. While a small group was recording, the large group worked on math stations or independent work as the room needed to be quiet for recording.

 

Carnazzos' Class: Two of Everything

Additional Notes: The picture of the pot came from a website that housed a bank of teacher lessons. While the students did not complete an official storyboard (just ran through the dialogue a few times), Ms. Carnazzo suggested that it might help with the flow (… though she did prefer the less scripted quality where it sounds like the students are just talking and not reading lines.) “Two of Everything” Extension.

Extensions & Ideas: If you would like to create a lesson like this or need further suggestions for how to integrate Puppet Pals into your classroom (at any grade level and with any content area)… check out this full Puppet Pals iLesson post.

 


05 Sep 2011
Comments: 1

Give Your Classroom a Voice with Songify

Appy Hours 4 You: As I mentioned in my Fakebook post, my passion is locating, assembling, and creating resources and lesson ideas to support existing technology (whether it be Web 2.0 tools or iPads). Starting our blog talk radio show was one more way that I wanted to support teachers in the district. While we offer multiple face-to-face courses for the iPad, I still have many teachers ask me what you can do with the device. Even a list of suggested apps can be cumbersome if teachers don’t have a goody bag of ideas to accompany the app or an explanation of how products can be removed from the app or device (e.g. emailed, synced from the photo roll, uploaded to Youtube, downloaded from a random url, etc…).

Thus the reason I felt such a calling to create our “appy hours 4 you” talk show and the portable format. While the show does air live, the intent was for it to be streamed later in the day (e.g. during lunch or while folding laundry at home later that evening) or downloaded to iTunes and listened to on the way to work or at the doctor’s office. Lesson to Go… if you will. Supporting our intent to create a portable learning tool, the vast majority of our listens have been to archived shows. As I do not have information as to the actual listeners of the show (just how many have listened), I am always curious as to who the users are and what they have done with the information shared.

2nd Grade Songify Project

 

Where is Short U? created with Songify

Songify: On Friday, I had to look no further than my inbox. I received a enthusiastic email from Ms. Carnazzo, a second grade teacher in the district, who had been using my blog resources throughout the summer. This was her first year to have an iPad in her classroom and she wanted to share her Songify class project with me. Overjoyed, I clicked on the link she sent me and found a beautiful Glogster EDU page with pictures of the students (she had full internet permissions for each child) decked out in colorful boas and sunglasses posing with a microphone and their iPad. As if that wasn’t adorable enough, she had five different short vowel songs posted (with a text box above each for the lyrics). Each of the songs were created by recording the students singing using Songify (one of the apps we highlighted in our first episode).

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What’s Next for our Appolicious Elementary Stars and their Teacher? Not only did the students love the project, Ms. Carnazzo has decided to have students complete a similar project with Talking Tom and a math song. As she wants the song to be one piece, she has decided to record each excerpt separately and then piece them together in a video editing tool like iMovie.

As my intention for the radio show was to instruct, inspire, and instill an autonomy for building lessons with the iPad that supports student learning and engagement, I would love to hear from others who have used or adapted the lesson ideas we have shared on our show.

Please email or comment with your lesson summary and apps used.


02 Sep 2011
Comments: 1

Screencasting, Problem-Solving, and Digital Storytelling: Episode 2

This is a supplement to “Appy Hours 4 You” Blog Talk Radio Show: Episode 2“Screencasting, Problem-Solving, and Digital Storytelling”. In addition to discussing how the four featured apps could be used instructionally (with multiple grade levels and content areas), we discussed the purpose and inspiration of the show, explained how to get images to the device (e.g. screenshots, camera, saving an image), and gave more in depth information on how to manage the apps with multiple students and collect products as well as limitations of the app(s) and what features the upgraded app offers or promises to offer in the next patch.

This week we discussed the following free apps:

  1. Doodle Buddy (Twitter): highlighted in ShowMe video above (also checkout Doodle Buddy featured in other edu blogs:

    Doodle Buddy Bar Graph

    1. Math: determine length of missing side of a triangle
    2. Speech Therapy: sketching, building vocabulary, and pictionary-like activities
    3. Occupational Therapy: developing fine motor skills (used to compare progress over a few weeks)
    4. Multi-content: science labs, math problems, alphabet books, annotate PowerPoints that have been turned into images
    5. Cooperative Work: Hangman
  2. Popplet Lite (Twitter): Ophelia Character Map & Math Vocabulary/Classification
  3. ScreenChomp (Twitter): Review and goal-setting example using Poetry Magnets screenshot, Math example using U.S. Quarters screenshot
  4. ShowMe (Twitter): example included above highlights Doodle Buddy screenshots (visit ShowMe Community for more examples)
  5. Explain Everything $ (Twitter): review and examples for student and teacher use (visit Explain Everything Showcase for more examples and a review of my EE projects)

 
 
Stream this week’s episode or download it in iTunes:

Listen to internet radio with Techchef4u on Blog Talk Radio

 
Our next show “Puppets 4 the Classroom airs September 8th at 10:00am which will highlight Sock Puppets, Puppet Pals, Tortoise & Hare Puppet Show, and PhotoPuppet HD Lite.