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07 Mar 2012
Comments: 1

Chef Carnazzo's Tasty iCreations

Feeling as if I should award Carnazzo an “Honorary TechChef” badge. Last week her students cooked up cereal sushi using a recipe from Teachers Pay Teachers (also check out Teacher Vision’s printables and resources for recipes). Her team pitched in to buy the lesson and recipes from the site. Students previewed the recipes in the morning and then followed the directions together to complete the dish. Afterwards students wrote their recipe reviews and drew a picture to complement it.

Carnazzo's Tasty Creations featured in Glogster

 

The next morning students reviewed the process for making cereal sushi and used the Sequence Events 2 template from Tools 4 Students app (well worth the 99 cent pricetag) to do the flow chart. The Tools 4 Students app actually has 25 templates ranging from Cause/Effect and Compare/Contrast to Problem/Solution and Sequence Events and Timeline. As a whole group, students came up with the steps and then worked in partners to input the steps into the Tools 4 Students template. Carnazzo then created the video with Animoto to highlight the event.

Tools4Students app highlighted in Turbo Collage app

 

Interested in FREE Graphic Organizers for the iPad, check out:

  1. iBrainstorm: Vocabulary and Gallery Walks
  2. Popplet Lite: Inferencing, Vocabulary, Sequencing, Character Maps, Frayer Models
  3. Holt Interactive Graphic Organizers opening in PaperPort Notes: Annotating PDF Templates and Paperless Passages

05 Jan 2012
Comments: 4

Putting an iSpin on Video Vocabulary

Touching base with one of my favorite ELA teachers, he mentioned a video vocabulary lesson. My ears and interest perked up and I decided to sit take a few minutes to sit in and observe his lesson. When I came in, students were writing six words in their glossary: courage, require, moral, physical, virtues, and centuries. These words all tie in to the units essential questions:

  1. Does courage require fearlessness, or can a person be afraid and still act courageously?
  2. What is the difference between moral and physical courage?
  3. What other virtues may be as important as courage?
  4. Is courage rare in human history, or have many people shown courage throughout the centuries?

 

Background: Previous to this class, students worked in small groups to locate the definition of their given word, compose a definition in their own words, use the word in a sentence, and model some sort of motion or animation to illustrate the word. The students featured all of these tasks in a short video.

 

Foreground: Students then watched multiple video versions (completed from groups in all class periods) of the same word and then created their own mash-up definition for the word from the videos and recorded it in their glossary. Understanding these definitions and being able to unpack the words is the foundation for being able to write successfully based on the essential questions for the unit.

 

The iSpin: Having my iPad and iPhone in tow…

I decided to quickly create my own Video Vocabulary project to submit!

 

iBrainstorm Vocabulary: I used iBrainstorm to map out (or brainstorm) my vocabulary word, definition, and sentence.

iBrainstorm Vocabulary

 

Vocabulary Video – WeeMee style: I then created a WeeMee video to feature a word of my choice “courage” in a sentence.


18 Nov 2011
Comments: 2

Primarily iProbability

If you are looking for an elementary iPad lesson in the techchef4u kitchen, it was probably cooked up by the ingenious Chef Carnazzo. This probability iLesson is no different. Carnazzo and her second grade class used the app ScreenChomp (featured in “Screen-casting & Problem-solving 4 the Classroom“) as a culminating apptivity from a week of work on probability (e.g. “TEKS 2.11: Probability and statistics. (C) use data to describe events as more likely or less likely such as drawing a certain color crayon from a bag of seven red crayons and three green crayons.”)


Chef Carnazzo Cooks up iProbability

 

Here’s how she did it:

  1. Teacher Preparation: Ms. Carnazzo chose the background pics (clipart from MS Word) and imported them to Doodle Buddy.
  2. Student Choice: Students chose stickers in Doodle Buddy.
  3. Student Assessment: Students had to answer (in written form) teacher pre-generated questions in reference to their picture.
  4. Highly Engaging: Carnazzo originally created the apptivity for an intervention group and, of course, the rest of the class wanted to do the apptivity as well.
  5. Small Group: While Ms. Carnazzo was working with small groups to record their screen-cast, the rest of the class had completed independent practice assignments at their desk.
  6. Student Planning & Preparation: Students used the questions and their answers on the worksheet that Ms. Carnazzo had prepared to craft the narration for their screencast. Carnazzo found it was useful to do a couple of dry runs prior to hitting the record button.
  7. Student Reactions: Students loved the ScreenChomp final project. Carnazzo stated the students really liked the part where their drawings appeared on the screen in the final product.
  8. Other Applications: Carnazzo felt this tool had a lot of klout in the classroom as students do so much problem-solving in math. She plans on using it in the future to have students record and compare different solution strategies to a single problem.

 

Sample other iCreations from the Carnazzo Kitchen: Grammar & Literacy with Tacky Wales, short vowel sounds with Songify, Math fact families with Talking Tom and friends, classifying motion with iCardSort, integrating Math and literacy using Puppet Pals Director’s Pass

 


08 Nov 2011
Comments: 4

iSequence

In an effort to incorporate the iPads into small group intervention stations for middle school math, I spent a few hours collaborating with Cheryl Mutz, an NEISD district Math Instructional Specialist, to create an apptivity to support the study of sequences in 8th Math. The intervention apptivity would be used in a small group setting (two students to an iPad) and the students would have 30-45 minutes to complete the task.

iSequence: Terms and Rules

 Resources: I have included a iCardSort_Sequences_TaskCard (task card) and  iCardSort_Sequences_Recording Sheet (recording sheet). The recording sheet is intended for students to show work or record answers if teachers choose not to use the email function on the iPad. (If teachers choose to use the email function, students will want to layer each individual sequence problem so all of the cards overlap. This way iCardSort views the cards as a group, or one problem, when it emails the written outline of information above the screenshot.) Check out iCardSort’s public deck repository… This deck is now available for anyone to download and utilize to easily replicate the apptivity.

iModel with Explain Everything: I have used Explain Everything to model how the iLesson could be delivered and the resources that have been provided within the iSequence apptivity.


 
Hungry for more iCardSort apptivities?

  1. iCardSort Lite (website): visit their public repository for pre-created decks and check out their newsletter for integration ideas.
    1. Elementary Science Example
    2. MS Math Example using vocabulary with handouts and lesson
    3. Sorting example for “Words 4 Students”
    4. Getting iN Touch with Vocabulary (using iCardSort and Graphic Organizers)
    5. Videos highlighting basic use and how to integrate in a literature circle

 

 

 


30 Oct 2011
Comments: 0

"Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery"

Last week I received an email from Donita O’Hair of Frisco ISD. She sent me a very sweet note: “Hi Lisa, I love your site and have gotton so many great ideas! Someone sent it to me that got it from a workshop. I hope you don’t mind… I used the teachers idea (Ms. Carnazzo’s original) for the sums of 10 activity and redid it. I just had a 5th grade student recreate an example for me.”
 

Ms. Carnazzo's Sums of 10

Mrs. O’Hair cooked up her version of the “sums of ten” video with a teacher task intro and blended it with iMovie. She also mentioned she shared a few techchef4u sock puppet examples via QR codes. She stated they are just getting started with iPads at Borchardt – they have approximately 60 iPads and 75 iTouches.

I am always pleased to find that teachers and technology specialists are using the resources that I and/or other guest chefs cook up. My main reason for blogging is to provide anyone with a healthy app-etite… a tech cuisine that can be consumed and adapted.

Please note that all resources on the site are copyrighted “©2011. Lisa Johnson. All rights reserved. Permission to reproduce materials for classroom use granted.”

 

While permission to reproduce is granted and attribution is not required, I do appreciate attribution in apptivities that are adapted. Mrs. O’Hair included a statement “adapted from an original techchef4u post” in the video notes of her adaptation of sums of 10.

Mrs. O’Hair has also been so kind to share some of her previous and upcoming apptivities and iLessons from her district. I am truly thrilled to collaborate and see what others cook up. Looking forward to a medley of inspiration, collaboration, and technology integration.

Surprisingly Educational Apps: Check out “Surprisingly Educational Apps” – the show that served as inspiration for how Talking Tom and friends could be used instructionaly. (We are now available in iTunes – search directly for “appy hours 4 u” or “techchef4u”)

 


19 Oct 2011
Comments: 2

Quadfecta of Integration: Brainstorming, Goal-Setting, iPads, Collaboration

Mrs. DeForrest and I met up again this morning to cook up another delectable fusion. This time we decided to use iBrainstorm and goal-setting questions to create a collaborative gallery walk activity.

How does the selection and pursuit of goals affect a person’s life?

Students will complete the walk in both reading and english class (each class has a different set of questions) that day and the questions will be used to introduce the unit based on the essential question (in bold above).

Questions for Gallery Walk

 

Here’s the recipe for accomplishing this app-tivity:

  1. Teacher prepares 6 stations with an iPad at each:
    1. Each station is a different number – ranging from 1-6
    2. Each station will have a different question corresponding to that number (print out on large piece of paper and post above or at station)
    3. Teacher will add a new board to each iPad using iBrainstorm. Teacher will label the board according to the station it is placed in: Question  1- Question 6 (e.g. iPad 1 for Station 1 would have a board within iBrainstorm labeled “Question 1” )
    4. Teacher will prepare student task cards for each station (using student directions below)
    5. Teacher will assign each student in each class period to a colored group. There are 6 colored groups: yellow, blue, green, red, orange, purple.
    6. Teacher will assign a role or task to each student in the group (e.g. Scribe for Questions 1-2, Scribe for Questions 3-4, Scribe for Questions 5-6, Final Submitter, Timekeeper/TaskMaster/BoardMaster). Roles can be adjusted as group sizes will vary.
    7.  Teacher will post instructions for submitting final board including teacher email address visible in the room.

     

Gallery Walk Rotation: Colors Correspond with iBrainstorm Sticky Notes

     

  1. Student Directions:
    1. Report to their first station according to rotation schedule (see role/task assignments for Scribe)
      1. Double-tap on the board in iBrainstorm to add a sticky note
      2. Double-tap the sticky note to edit the color to change it to correspond to your group’s color
      3. Type in your answer to the question (may have several stickies for each question for each group)
      4. Tap the keyboard icon (in the far bottom right of your keyboard) or the cork board background to return back to your canvas
      5. Move stickies by pressing and dragging to group or pinch out to zoom in (if necessary)
    2. Report to second station according to rotation schedule and complete same process (see role/task assignments for Scribe)
    3. Report to third-sixth stations using same process and instructions
    4. At last station (after answers to final question have been posted on board), follow Final Submitter instructions:
      1. After last question is answered at last station, tap square with arrow in upper right hand corner of screen to submit
      2. Tap “Send in Email
      3. To: “Teacher email” you have been given (e.g. anyteacher@neisd.net)
      4. Subject: “Period#: Question #: Actual Question” (e.g. Period 2: Question 1: What is goal-setting?)
      5. In Body of Email: “Write group members names and color of group” (e.g. Purple Group: Stefan, Elena, Damen, Bonnie
      6. Tap “Send” (receive verification from teacher that board was received) – should also hear “whoosh” sound
    5. At last station, BoardMaster will shake iPad and select “Delete Everything
 

iBrainstorm: Gallery Walk Questions

Resources/References:

  1. Setting & Achieving Goals for Grades 5-9

 

Also check out these resources:
  1. Getting iN Touch with Vocabulary: iDevice Graphic Organizer Lesson
  2. Take A Chomp Out of Your Learning Goals: Screen-casting to express goals
  3. HOT Apps 4 Brainstorming: Free Brainstorming & Mind-Mapping Apps (reviews, lessons, and resources)
  4. Need Inspiration? Check out 100 Reasons to Mind Map

 

 


18 Oct 2011
Comments: 3

Getting iN Touch with Vocabulary

A fortunate happenstance allowed Mrs. Deforest (our ELAR Facilitator) and myself to land at Ed White Middle School on a day of benchmark testing. At first both of us considered rescheduling our visits but thankfully decided to work together on integrating technology into the upcoming 6th ACL unit instead.

What are some complexities involved in coming to an understanding of ourselves and others?

The essential question drove the activities and technology tools and resources that were assembled that day. Mrs. Deforest already had the videos and readings assembled and had ideas for the activity (e,g, graphic organizer, think/pair/share, gallery walk, Socratic circles, brainstorming, impromptu speech, etc…). I merely had to sprinkle some app-erific seasoning on a few of the dishes to really bring out their flavor…

Resource: One of the first weeks involved students watching a video from a student, Eve Shalen Krakowski, reflecting upon an experience she had in eighth grade:

App-tivity: After the video clip, students would be directed to discuss what it meant to be an “insider” or an “outsider“. As the ELAR department on campus had just received 60 iPads (divided into 3 carts with 20 in each) for classroom use, I wanted to choose a tool that could accomplish the task as well as lend itself as an ingredient to other dishes in the future. I felt iCardSort and a graphic organizer PDF to create a Frayer model would do the trick.

Holt Interactive Graphic Organizers: 38 Total

 

Here’s the recipe for accomplishing this app-tivity:

  1. Launch Safari on your iPad.
  2. Visit http://bit.ly/15hr8m (a bitly version for Holt Interactive Graphic Organizers)
  3. Create a webclip for the site:
    1. tap the box with the arrow on the right of the browser
    2. tap “add to home screen”
    3. save
  4. Launch the site from your new web clip
  5. Select the Web Diagram graphic organizer
  6. Take a screenshot:
    1. press home and off buttons at same time
    2. photo will be automatically saved to your photo roll
  7. Launch iCardSort app
  8. Select an option for delivery:
    1. Teacher creates and beams/blasts default deck: Teacher creates a default deck with labels (“insider”, “definition”, “examples”, “non-examples”, “characteristics”) and students import Frayer Model default deck
    2. Students create deck from scratch
  9. Set the background:
    1. Tap box with arrow on right
    2. Tap Settings/Background Images/Choose Saved Photo/Select Web Diagram
  10. Create a Frayer Model for the word “insider”
    1. Double Tap anywhere on background to create a new card
  11. Layer all cards (grouped so they touch) in each circle before you submit
  12. Email the deck to your teacher (will include 5 groups of text as well as image of model)
  13.  

iCardSort with Holt Interactive G.O. as background


 

Also check out these resources:
  1. Use neu.Annotate PDF free app to annotate PDF (with pens, highlighters, shapes, images, and text)
  2. Use Eduplace graphic organizers in addition to Holt
  3. HOT Apps 4 Brainstorming: Free Brainstorming & Mind-Mapping Apps (reviews, lessons, and resources)
  4. Need Inspiration? Check out 100 Reasons to Mind Map

15 Sep 2011
Comments: 1

Clever Carnazzo's Cards

Meritorious Motion

Appy Alliteration: With an affinity for alliteration and all things Apple, I set out to congratulate Carnazzo on her creative use of cards with her class. Julio Barros, the iCardSort app developer, was kind enough to send us a few priceless promo codes for the full incredible iCardSort version. I forwarded one of these codes to Ms. Carnazzo in recognition for her savvy use of Songify and received another c-app-tivating lesson:

Meritorious Motion: Her class had been studying motion in science and had recently completed an empirical experiment to see which type of motion different items would show. After students completed the appropriate activity, she used iCardSort to group items to see what properties (e.f. bounce, spin, slide, roll) items in each group had in common. Students wanted to show that some items could be cleverly classified in more than one group so some are on the lines overlapping 2 groups. Students then brilliantly brainstormed other items that they thought would fit in the different groups. The pretty bright pink cards are their additional ideas.

 

If you are interested in replicating this lesson with your studious students, visit the iCardSort public decks in the next few days for the deck.

Noteworthy Newsletter: Also check out E-string‘s noteworthy newsletter which includes the original techchef4u HOTS Math Vocabulary lesson and some app-tastic Vimeo videos that highlight how to use iCardSort and how the app can be used in a lovely literature circle.

 

 

 


11 Sep 2011
Comments: 0

Suprisingly Educational, Entertaining, and Engaging

I came across the lite version of MyPlayHome this week. The Lite version gives you full access and interactivity to two rooms, the kitchen and living room. Those two rooms alone kept my preschool son, also known as the app critic, busy for 30-45 minutes. His favorite discovery was that throwing away a piece of food in the kitchen replaces it in its prior location (e.g. table, cabinet, etc…). I later decided to check out the full version and was very pleased with the two extra rooms, bathroom and bedroom. Another fantastic bonus to the app is it will grow over time with more rooms and accessories. If they are taking suggestions, I would request a backyard with a grill, sandbox, picnic table, and flower/vegetable garden. What other toys can you say have that economical feature?

My PlayHome: DoodleBuddy Vocab

With that said, I will transfer my mommy hat to my educator cap… While this app may appear like a “doll house for the iPad generation”, it holds far more educational inspiration than sheer interactive entertainment. Thus, I have compiled a list of 7 ways I would use this app in the classroom:

  1. Have students create dialogue based on what the characters are doing in the house. This would be a great way for students to practice sentence structure, pronouns, and adjectives. (Consider taking screenshots and adding the dialogue with another app… like Doodle Buddy).
  2. Have students practice sequencing. Give students a series of directions or have students come up with a first/next/then structure for a task. (This could also be achieved with screenshots and Popplet Lite.)
  3. Have students practice vocabulary/spelling by taking a screenshot and opening it up in Doodle Buddy and adding words to annotate a room in the house.
  4. Have students discuss their own routines/traditions for getting ready in the morning, going to bed, family time, etc… (Consider having students take a screenshot and then discuss it in ShowMe or ScreenChomp.)
  5. Have students create/solve a math problem based on a scenario inspired by one of the rooms. (Challenge students to find/classify various shapes in each room.)
  6. Have students compare/contrast a room in the play home to the same room in their home.
  7. Have students write a descriptive paragraph about a room.

My PlayHome: Sequencing with Popplet Lite