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19 Oct 2011
Comments: 2

Quadfecta of Integration: Brainstorming, Goal-Setting, iPads, Collaboration

Mrs. DeForrest and I met up again this morning to cook up another delectable fusion. This time we decided to use iBrainstorm and goal-setting questions to create a collaborative gallery walk activity.

How does the selection and pursuit of goals affect a person’s life?

Students will complete the walk in both reading and english class (each class has a different set of questions) that day and the questions will be used to introduce the unit based on the essential question (in bold above).

Questions for Gallery Walk

 

Here’s the recipe for accomplishing this app-tivity:

  1. Teacher prepares 6 stations with an iPad at each:
    1. Each station is a different number – ranging from 1-6
    2. Each station will have a different question corresponding to that number (print out on large piece of paper and post above or at station)
    3. Teacher will add a new board to each iPad using iBrainstorm. Teacher will label the board according to the station it is placed in: Question  1- Question 6 (e.g. iPad 1 for Station 1 would have a board within iBrainstorm labeled “Question 1” )
    4. Teacher will prepare student task cards for each station (using student directions below)
    5. Teacher will assign each student in each class period to a colored group. There are 6 colored groups: yellow, blue, green, red, orange, purple.
    6. Teacher will assign a role or task to each student in the group (e.g. Scribe for Questions 1-2, Scribe for Questions 3-4, Scribe for Questions 5-6, Final Submitter, Timekeeper/TaskMaster/BoardMaster). Roles can be adjusted as group sizes will vary.
    7.  Teacher will post instructions for submitting final board including teacher email address visible in the room.

     

Gallery Walk Rotation: Colors Correspond with iBrainstorm Sticky Notes

     

  1. Student Directions:
    1. Report to their first station according to rotation schedule (see role/task assignments for Scribe)
      1. Double-tap on the board in iBrainstorm to add a sticky note
      2. Double-tap the sticky note to edit the color to change it to correspond to your group’s color
      3. Type in your answer to the question (may have several stickies for each question for each group)
      4. Tap the keyboard icon (in the far bottom right of your keyboard) or the cork board background to return back to your canvas
      5. Move stickies by pressing and dragging to group or pinch out to zoom in (if necessary)
    2. Report to second station according to rotation schedule and complete same process (see role/task assignments for Scribe)
    3. Report to third-sixth stations using same process and instructions
    4. At last station (after answers to final question have been posted on board), follow Final Submitter instructions:
      1. After last question is answered at last station, tap square with arrow in upper right hand corner of screen to submit
      2. Tap “Send in Email
      3. To: “Teacher email” you have been given (e.g. anyteacher@neisd.net)
      4. Subject: “Period#: Question #: Actual Question” (e.g. Period 2: Question 1: What is goal-setting?)
      5. In Body of Email: “Write group members names and color of group” (e.g. Purple Group: Stefan, Elena, Damen, Bonnie
      6. Tap “Send” (receive verification from teacher that board was received) – should also hear “whoosh” sound
    5. At last station, BoardMaster will shake iPad and select “Delete Everything
 

iBrainstorm: Gallery Walk Questions

Resources/References:

  1. Setting & Achieving Goals for Grades 5-9

 

Also check out these resources:
  1. Getting iN Touch with Vocabulary: iDevice Graphic Organizer Lesson
  2. Take A Chomp Out of Your Learning Goals: Screen-casting to express goals
  3. HOT Apps 4 Brainstorming: Free Brainstorming & Mind-Mapping Apps (reviews, lessons, and resources)
  4. Need Inspiration? Check out 100 Reasons to Mind Map

 

 


18 Oct 2011
Comments: 3

Getting iN Touch with Vocabulary

A fortunate happenstance allowed Mrs. Deforest (our ELAR Facilitator) and myself to land at Ed White Middle School on a day of benchmark testing. At first both of us considered rescheduling our visits but thankfully decided to work together on integrating technology into the upcoming 6th ACL unit instead.

What are some complexities involved in coming to an understanding of ourselves and others?

The essential question drove the activities and technology tools and resources that were assembled that day. Mrs. Deforest already had the videos and readings assembled and had ideas for the activity (e,g, graphic organizer, think/pair/share, gallery walk, Socratic circles, brainstorming, impromptu speech, etc…). I merely had to sprinkle some app-erific seasoning on a few of the dishes to really bring out their flavor…

Resource: One of the first weeks involved students watching a video from a student, Eve Shalen Krakowski, reflecting upon an experience she had in eighth grade:

App-tivity: After the video clip, students would be directed to discuss what it meant to be an “insider” or an “outsider“. As the ELAR department on campus had just received 60 iPads (divided into 3 carts with 20 in each) for classroom use, I wanted to choose a tool that could accomplish the task as well as lend itself as an ingredient to other dishes in the future. I felt iCardSort and a graphic organizer PDF to create a Frayer model would do the trick.

Holt Interactive Graphic Organizers: 38 Total

 

Here’s the recipe for accomplishing this app-tivity:

  1. Launch Safari on your iPad.
  2. Visit http://bit.ly/15hr8m (a bitly version for Holt Interactive Graphic Organizers)
  3. Create a webclip for the site:
    1. tap the box with the arrow on the right of the browser
    2. tap “add to home screen”
    3. save
  4. Launch the site from your new web clip
  5. Select the Web Diagram graphic organizer
  6. Take a screenshot:
    1. press home and off buttons at same time
    2. photo will be automatically saved to your photo roll
  7. Launch iCardSort app
  8. Select an option for delivery:
    1. Teacher creates and beams/blasts default deck: Teacher creates a default deck with labels (“insider”, “definition”, “examples”, “non-examples”, “characteristics”) and students import Frayer Model default deck
    2. Students create deck from scratch
  9. Set the background:
    1. Tap box with arrow on right
    2. Tap Settings/Background Images/Choose Saved Photo/Select Web Diagram
  10. Create a Frayer Model for the word “insider”
    1. Double Tap anywhere on background to create a new card
  11. Layer all cards (grouped so they touch) in each circle before you submit
  12. Email the deck to your teacher (will include 5 groups of text as well as image of model)
  13.  

iCardSort with Holt Interactive G.O. as background


 

Also check out these resources:
  1. Use neu.Annotate PDF free app to annotate PDF (with pens, highlighters, shapes, images, and text)
  2. Use Eduplace graphic organizers in addition to Holt
  3. HOT Apps 4 Brainstorming: Free Brainstorming & Mind-Mapping Apps (reviews, lessons, and resources)
  4. Need Inspiration? Check out 100 Reasons to Mind Map

13 Oct 2011
Comments: 0

iPad App Shootouts and iPad App Playgrounds

In the process of cleaning out my cluttered inbox and adding Web 2.0 tools to my new Scoop.it pageTech Bucket List“, I came across these two iPad resources. Thought I would share:

  1. iPad App Shootout

    Rock Your World: iPad App Shootout: a webinar created to “address the desire of iPad users in CMS and BEYOND (global) to discuss the apps they see useful and beneficial to the education of students.” It airs every 4th week of the month. This idea aligns with their iPad Chat Vision: “To be a PLN of iPad users that are connected in CMS with the two focuses on administrative and instructional use. To have a dialogue with CMS iPad users in an open and safe environment.”

    They also provide additional resources and PLN opportunities:

    1. Twitter hashtags: #CMSiPadChat
    2. Yammer Group
    3. Opportunities to share apps instructionally to meet objectives

     

  2. St. Clair County iPad Apps Playground: St. Clair has created a Google Site with a Google Form for teachers to submit their favorite educational apps which creates a resulting iPad Apps Playground spreadsheet. Some of the submission qualifiers on the iPad Google Form that I really found useful were:
    1. “Does the app require wifi or network access in order to work?”
    2. “Does the app rely on access to cameras not found on the first generation iPad?”
    3. iPad Only options (iPad Only, Compatible, Unsure)
    4. Range of Cost Drop-Down

iPad Apps Playground

 


04 Oct 2011
Comments: 0

Fall "Appy Hours 4 U" show list

Fall 2011: Appy Hour Schedule

Appy Hours 4 U: Fall 2011

Check out our fall season of appy hour shows. We will be airing live on Thursdays at 3:30pm. Login in to the chat to discuss app integration and iLesson ideas with other teachers. Each show features free apps that can be used across various content areas  and with multiple grade levels. If you miss the live show, stream us later or download the episode to iTunes. Visit techchef4u’s blog supplements to each show posted before the episode.

  1. HOT Apps 4 Brainstorming: 9/29
  2. Music: 10/6
  3. Videolicious Products: 10/13
  4. Eanes ISD: 1:1 iPad: 10/20
  5. ELA Games: 11/3
  6. Killeen iPod Integration: 11/10
  7. Surprisingly Edu: Part 2: 11/17
  8. Math Games: 12/1
  9. Comics: 12/8
  10. iBuild iPad Lessons: 12/15

 

Also check out our previously recorded shows:

 


27 Sep 2011
Comments: 6

Double Your Learning! Double Your Fun!

 

Carnazzos' Class: Two of Everything

Ms. Carnazzosclass is back at it again – integrating the iPad into innovative learning experiences. Thanks to a gracious donation from the app developer of Puppet Pals’s Director’s Pass, her class received a promo code for the full version including all of the characters and backgrounds as well as the ability to create your own characters and backgrounds.

In Math, Ms. Carnazzos’ class read the book “Two of Everything” by Lily Toy Hong. The story describes a magic pot that doubles everything that is put inside it.

Using her class iPad, Ms. Carnazzo achieved the trifecta of integration melding literacy, mathematics, and technology into this wonderfully crafted iLesson.

 

 

Here’s how she did it:

Two of Everything

  1. Students worked in cooperative groups of 4. They decided together what their number sentence would be and what object they would put into the pot. Then they each had to solve and explain their strategy on paper.
  2. Each group met with Ms. Canazzo to solidify their story plot.
  3. After the initial teacher conference, students got to choose their setting and each student chose a character. (This helped the group decide who would have what lines.)
  4. Students practiced their lines on their own and with Ms. Carnazzo a few times. Then they recorded their final show. (This process took 3 or 4 times to get it right due to…. forgotten lines, background noise, voice recording being too soft, trouble moving their character while they spoke right into the mic on the ipad.)
  5. While a small group was recording, the large group worked on math stations or independent work as the room needed to be quiet for recording.

 

Carnazzos' Class: Two of Everything

Additional Notes: The picture of the pot came from a website that housed a bank of teacher lessons. While the students did not complete an official storyboard (just ran through the dialogue a few times), Ms. Carnazzo suggested that it might help with the flow (… though she did prefer the less scripted quality where it sounds like the students are just talking and not reading lines.) “Two of Everything” Extension.

Extensions & Ideas: If you would like to create a lesson like this or need further suggestions for how to integrate Puppet Pals into your classroom (at any grade level and with any content area)… check out this full Puppet Pals iLesson post.

 


26 Sep 2011
Comments: 0

Appy Hours and App Smackdowns

HS Appy Hour: Thank you Carl Hooker, Eanes ISD Director of Instructional Technology (and “iEvangelist from the planet Hookertron”) for sharing your H.S. Appy Hour menu (modeled after the techchef4u menus linked below). Carl added a very cool feature to his menu: open it in iBooks and the app buttons will actually take you to the app store when you can download the app of your choice. I think I will be “borrowing” this feature when I revamp our secondary menus. (Can’t wait for the release of the app smackdown video!). AppyHourMenu9-19-2011_EanesISDpdf

Eanes ISD Appy Hour Menu

Noterize: I fell in love with Noterize (featured in the All Purpose section of the menu) and shared it as part of a my South San ISD iPad Camp. They loved the integration with PDF’s and the multiple classroom implementation possibilities. Stay tuned for an upcoming techchef4u post which will include home-baked recipes for how to integrate PDF’s into your iLesson Toolkit!  

If you devoured the Eanes ISD menu, whet your palette with blod flavor of these appy morsels:

  1. Secondary Math Menu
  2. Secondary Science Menu
  3. Secondary History Menu
  4. Secondary ELAR Menu
  5. Apps for Parents
  6. HOT Apps 4 HOTS
  7. Appy Hours Direct 2 U: Free Delivery

22 Sep 2011
Comments: 0

3 Ways to Manage Student iPads in the Classroom

As the tidal wave of iDevices hit the shores this fall, I felt it was a good time to highlight a few ways to manage these devices with students.
  1. Add a Custom Email Signature: If you have email set up (we have a generic student email on each device that allows outgoing emails and restricts incoming) on the device to submit student work, consider adding a custom signature to your iDevice to discourage/manage rogue emails and inappropriate student use. Giving each device a different traceable signature will make it easier to locate the device that sent an inappropriate email. It is advised that each student uses the same iPad each class (e.g. Johnny is assigned iPad 4 for English Class 3rd period and Janie is assigned iPad 4 for English Class 4th period) to further streamline this process.
    1. Settings
    2. Mail, Contacts, Calendars
    3. Signature
    4. “Sent from Johnson Middle School: tag#****”
  2. Set up MobileMe on your devices to locate and manage stolen or missing iDevices:
    1. Settings
    2. Mail, Contacts, Calendar
    3. Add Account
    4. MobileMe
    5. Enter Apple ID and password
    6. Next to Verify
    7. OK to allow MobileMe to use the Location
    8. Save
    9. Login to me.com on your computer with the Apple ID and password to track devices
    10. From Me.com, you can Display a Message or Play Sound on the missing device (sound will play when device is on or turned back on) as well as Lock or Wipe it.
  3. Add Numbered Backgrounds to your iDevices (find full setup info for iDevices here) to minimize inappropriate student customization and make checking in/out of iDevices smoother:
    1. Launch Safari on the device
    2. Visit http://bit.ly/pgipadwp (you only need to type in bit.ly/pgipadwp
    3. Select the wallpaper you want for that device (you can choose green backgrounds with yellow or blue text and numbers 1-30)
    4. Tap and hold a couple of seconds to save the image
    5. Launch Photo App (sunflower icon)
    6. Select the image you chose in step 3&4
    7. Hit the arrow
    8. Select as Wallpaper
    9. Set it as both lock screen and home screen

 

 


21 Sep 2011
Comments: 2

Chalk it Up to a Learning Experience!:

Came across this a few days ago and actually had a few minutes to play with it this evening. No fancy alliteration this morning – just the facts (and perhaps an idiom)!

 

  1. It is NOT an app – just a website that only works with the iPad.
  2. Type in the url (chalk.37signals.com) in Safari on your device (would recommend creating a webclip – you are going to like this one)
  3. Chalk up your thoughts, create a chalk outline, work out a problem, map out a plot, create a Frayer model or a KWL chart (use 2 dif. colors of chalk and realistic eraser)
  4. Press send arrow box for instructions on how to save your creation (image saves to your photo roll where it can then be emailed)

 



06 Jul 2011
Comments: 0

iPad Consumption vs. Production: the Great Debate

Outdated Infographic

Less than a year ago, my initial infographic (compiled from info from various blogs and articles on the topic of what the iPad can and cannot do) consisted of this very debate: consumption vs. production. Many of the first iPad lessons that I created were written to use the iPad for consumption: research, collecting data, writing prompts, virtual tours, and inspiration for upcoming projects. The suggested final product or writing assignment was to be completed with a Web 2.0 tool or available peripheral.

Consumption vs. Production

Flash-forward (pun intended) ten months or so and the iPad2 with camera and video capability as well as an ever-evolving prolific store of apps (which I get lost in for hours a night) has rapidly morphed the way I use my iPad and how I promote its use in the classroom. Yes ArounderTouch and Tour Wrist are phenomenal apps for virtual 360 tours, but why not create a tour with Photosynth or DerManDar. There are thousands of ebooks and interactive book apps available for all ages, but now you can create your own with Calibre or by simply saving a document as a PDF or ePub and dragging it into iBooks. You can watch a puppet show about Tortoise & the Hare or a 60second Recap of the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, but why not create your own with Puppet Pals or Sock Puppets.

I will say that I am biased (being a Mac User, iPhone Geek, and iPad enthusiastyes, I own and often appear in all of these Apple-related fashion items) towards the iPad as the tablet for education because I do find it to be so intuitive and I have some brand loyalty. Above and beyond that, whatever tablet or device you choose to implement needs to be used as a learner-centered tool for communication with multimedia and as a global consumer. After reading much of the lively discussion on iPads in Education and how they are used in the classroom, I believe many of the contributors would tend to agree that it is truly not about the tech but the teach:

  • What are we asking students to do with the device?
  • Has our pedagogy changed?
  • Are the devices being used to foster learning and innovation while providing a platform for differentiated instruction or are they being used as a lighter version of a textbook?
  • Furthermore, are we teaching digital and media literacy and producing critical consumers?
  • Are students able to evaluate the information they consume?

Stepping down from my soapbox, I am confronted with another issue. The campuses I support have not initiated a 1:1 ratio and the iPad was never truly intended to be a multi-user device. While it is sometimes appropriate to have students surf the internet to research a topic, launch an app to track earthquakes, or reshuffle their deck of vocabulary words in iCardSort before the next user, it often presents an issue when you desire to have students produce rather than consume.

While I use my iPad to produce videos, photos, and mindmaps on a regular basis, logistically this presents a hurdle when you want to mass produce these products class period to period.

Multi-User Production

  • Image Products: If you are using free apps (which I am inclined to do so due to the VPP being a tad bit convaluded and time-consuming for educators), you may only be able to create one product at a time like in Popplet Lite which means students will need to either save the image to the photo library or email it. If you have enabled the email feature, how did you create the email? Is it a school email or a department email? Who will be responsible for checking it (especially if this is not a class set of iPads and is meant to be used on a revolving basis with the department, grade level, and/or team)? If you intend to pull the photos off the devices at the end of the day, who has the syncing computer and will it be an issue that students will have access to other students mindmaps or products in the photo library before creating their own?
  • Video Products: Most video products are either saved to the video library on the device or must be uploaded to YouTube. Again, will teachers wait till the end of the day to pull off all of the video products when they sync each device or will they allow students to upload products to Youtube? If students are uploading to Youtube, who’s email account are they using and is this process highlighted in the Acceptable Use Policy for the district?
  • Annotations: I love the idea of annotating PDF’s and books. However, this process was meant to be done as a single-user. If you highlight and take notes in a book in iBooks in period 1, the same notes will be available to the user in period 2. If this were to be an ongoing project or the annotation process was to be similar for each class, this presents an issue. While you can email the notes, is it realistic for each student to do this each period as the notes will compile and be duplicated? Do we open a PDF in Doodle Buddy instead? Or do we morph the project to accommodate the device? Will one class period highlight and annotate based on character traits, another on theme, and another on setting and imagery? If so, this is a welcome change, but a change nonetheless to how we deliver instruction and how students communicate.

Though I find it easier to use a Neo2 with Google Docs capabilities in conjunction with the device or a Google Docs account on the device for word-processing and collaborative writing, other products do not have such a simple solution. I am in no way trying to be a Debbie Device Downer or trying to deter teachers from implementing the devices in their classrooms. On the contrary, I want to encourage and promote the use of the devices to fundamentally better pedagogical practices, instruction, learning, and education at its core but at the same time I think this is a worthy valid discussion:

  • What are the logistics involved with using the iPads as multi-user devices in schools for production?
  • How are the devices managed?
  • Do we connect them to a wireless printer, create email accounts, set up class Dropboxes and YouTube accounts?
  • How do we manage the submission of products at the elementary and secondary level?
  • Will/should the plan differ from elementary to high school?
  • Does every product have to be submitted or can teachers deploy another way to grade and evaluate student creations?

As with anything, I am sure that my qualms will be distant post as soon as the iOS 5 and iCloud capabilities are launched and fully realized. But in the meantime, it is worth pondering as we integrate these devices into our daily life and classroom.


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