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28 Jan 2012
Comments: 1

Paperless Passages with PaperPort

Our ELA and ELL teachers were scheduled to conduct a Super Saturday session for ELL students. They had requested that I support them with some apptivities that would focus on unfamiliar vocabulary. The passage (written by Mr. Wayment) was originally included as a handout. I simply converted the document to a PDF, gave it a public URL in Dropbox, and suggested it be completed in an app like Neu.Annotate PDF or PaperPort Notes. Not only does integrating the iPad provide the teachers with an engaging paperless lesson, apps like PaperPort Notes also provide a way for students to provide responses both in written and auditory form. Consider having students answer the following question “Do you think it was right or wrong for the people at the wake to laugh about things that Mr. Ortiz had said and done?” using the voice recording feature.

Annotate your PDF's in PaperPort Notes and include a Voice Message

 

Follow-up activity: This involved students illustrating their own “common words (see page 17 & 18)” vocabulary word from the list. This would include the word, a definition of the word, using the word in a sentence, and a visual representation of the word. The visual could be a picture of the student portraying the word (if the classroom has an iPad 2) or a hand-drawn illustration in an app like Doodle Buddy. Students had the choice of the following words (howl, wail, cry, moan, sob, chuckle, snicker, giggle, guffaw, and explode with laughter). The final product would be assembled in Popplet Lite. An extension could be using Popplet Lite to place each of the words on a spectrum of intensity (e.g. howl to explode with laughter). Also visit Taxonomy of Ideas for a framework. 

Illustrating Vocabulary with Popplet Lite

 

Check out other iLessons and iResources with Neu.Annotate PDF and Popplet Lite.


25 Jan 2012
Comments: 1

Add Some iSpice to your Weather Study

This post could not have come at a better time as we are experiencing all matter of wacky weather this week (I actually spent about an hour with a wet vac in my garage at 2 am to remove rising water).

Wunder Map app highlights precipitation

 

Science 2.8 (A): “measure, record, and graph weather information, including temperature, wind conditions, precipitation, and cloud coverage, in order to identify patterns in the data”

Ms. Carnazzo recently posted student weather reports using the Talking Tom & Ben News app. Prior to recording their weather report, students gathered weather data in their journals using personal observations, the internet, and the app WunderMap (also check out online version). Maps in WunderMap include webcam images and data on temperature, wind, and precipitation as well as multiple layers (e.g. precipitation, clouds, animated radar and satellite, and severe weather).

Carnazzo Student Weather Reports

While this is a second grade science apptivity, the idea can also be translated to a secondary classroom.

Science 8.10 (B): “Identify how global patterns of atmospheric movement influence local weather using weather maps that show high and low pressures and fronts”

How do global patterns of atmospheric movement affect our local weather?

 

In this scenario, students would use the internet to acquire weather data and information on pressures and fronts. The students could then use Videolicious app to create a “weather forecast” presentation. Images for Videolicious could be screenshots from apps (the Weather Channel and Wundermap) or the internet, and actual images taken of the weather outside. Students would also be provided with the vocabulary (e.g. front, high pressure, low pressure, air mass, etc…) they must use in their presentation.

USA Today features National Pressure Data

 

Many times these science-based apptivities are conducted in a series of stations. Consider having students use an interactive tool (other than the iPad… dare I say?) to create their own weather report after gathering their data and research from the internet and apps. This could be done prior to creating the weather report.

Consider Multiple Station Activities to Support Weather Study

 

Students could also create weather reports using Little Bird Tales (and screenshots), or Jing, or SMART recording software and a notebook (see weather forecasting interactive lesson).

SMART Weather Reporting Interactive Notebook


22 Jan 2012
Comments: 0

Building Sentences & Language Paperlessly!

A fellow ITS, Brad Cloud, was scheduled to conduct an iPad lesson with some recent immigrants at Nimitz Middle School. He mentioned he was looking for an app that would be useful for sentence building. I instantly thought of Read on Sight Free (formerly Word-Blocks) which was one of the apps that we had featured on our Hot Apps 4 Literacy show.

Read On Sight Free

 

I was thrilled to find an email after the iLesson that not only described how the students used it but provided a useful extension activity as well:

“I just wanted to let you know that Militza and I had a great time today working with her recent immigrants class (7 students) and the iPads. We used an app that would generate a sentence, and then scramble it just seconds later. The students were positively reinforced when they were able to correctly unscramble the sentence. It then generated a new sentence, and the process continued. The app is called Reading On Sight (thanks to Lisa Johnson for leading me to the app).”

Extension Activity in Notes: 

Militza had the great idea of asking the students to take the original sentences and add clauses to them to make more complex sentences. We then asked them to type their sentences in the Notes app, and email their work to their teacher. A totally paperless lesson! It was great.”

Read On Sight Free

 


05 Jan 2012
Comments: 4

Putting an iSpin on Video Vocabulary

Touching base with one of my favorite ELA teachers, he mentioned a video vocabulary lesson. My ears and interest perked up and I decided to sit take a few minutes to sit in and observe his lesson. When I came in, students were writing six words in their glossary: courage, require, moral, physical, virtues, and centuries. These words all tie in to the units essential questions:

  1. Does courage require fearlessness, or can a person be afraid and still act courageously?
  2. What is the difference between moral and physical courage?
  3. What other virtues may be as important as courage?
  4. Is courage rare in human history, or have many people shown courage throughout the centuries?

 

Background: Previous to this class, students worked in small groups to locate the definition of their given word, compose a definition in their own words, use the word in a sentence, and model some sort of motion or animation to illustrate the word. The students featured all of these tasks in a short video.

 

Foreground: Students then watched multiple video versions (completed from groups in all class periods) of the same word and then created their own mash-up definition for the word from the videos and recorded it in their glossary. Understanding these definitions and being able to unpack the words is the foundation for being able to write successfully based on the essential questions for the unit.

 

The iSpin: Having my iPad and iPhone in tow…

I decided to quickly create my own Video Vocabulary project to submit!

 

iBrainstorm Vocabulary: I used iBrainstorm to map out (or brainstorm) my vocabulary word, definition, and sentence.

iBrainstorm Vocabulary

 

Vocabulary Video – WeeMee style: I then created a WeeMee video to feature a word of my choice “courage” in a sentence.


04 Jan 2012
Comments: 2

Glogster Learning Stations & iHybrids

Asked to develop a technology-integrated lesson for 5th Math, I naturally leaned to using the iPad. However, the lesson is being developed as a district resource and not every campus has iPads or iPods. Thus, I created a hybrid lesson. Since the elementary math specialists already had a bank of word problems that they had used in a “Words to Symbols” matching activity, we only had to spruce up some of the text and make it applicable or relevant to the apps we planned on using.

Glogster Learning Station: 5th Math - Patterns, Relationships, & Algebraic Thinking

 

The resources:

  1. Word Problem Videos: Each word problem was created with apps (e.g. Talking Pierre, Talking WeeMee, Talking Ben, and Puppet Pals). These videos were then emailed from my iPad and uploaded to Glogster EDU.
  2. Recording Sheet: The recording sheet was created in Word and dropped into my public Dropbox folder which generates a unique URL which will allow anyone to access the document (as there is no feature to upload documents in the free version of Glogster EDU).
  3. Glogster Learning Station: The Glogster Learning Station is great and visually appealing way to house all of your resources for students to access during the learning activity. Within the learning station, I included teacher’s notes, student directions, the word problem videos (and text translation), and a screenshot of the recording sheet that hyperlinks to the actual sheet (available to download), and an extra activity (that could serve as an additional assessment).

 

While this is a teacher-created station, the idea is so simple that students could create their own learning centers or create resources for a classroom learning station (as featured by Ms. Carnazzo’s class). Her class worked in small groups to create content to teach facts about government.

Class Glogster Learning Station: 2nd Grade Government Facts

 

The beauty utilizing Glogster EDU as a learning station (see more Glogster Learning Station resources) is that it frees up the teacher from disseminating directions and materials and it frees up devices in the classroom. Many classrooms only have one iPad (or a handful) and a few computer stations accessible to their students. By using the hybrid model, students can visit the Glogster station and then use other tools to complete an extension or remediation (e.g. two or three groups of students are working at Glogster learning stations, one group may be creating their word problem video or Khan-esque explanation using an iDevice and/or Document camera, and another group could be using the SMART board notebook lesson (or laminated cards) to match word problems with equations). This is also a great idea for differentiated instruction.

How times have changed…I created the following learning station glog (“Don’t Underestimate Yourself”) for middle school mathematics less than two years ago and the video resources took me nearly all day to edit and prepare… on a PC. With the flux of mobile devices and the ease of media production on these devices, I was able to knock out the video resources for the equations glog in less than an hour (and that was only due to the fact that I am a bit of a perfectionist).

Glogster Learning Station: Secondary Geometry & Spatial Reasoning

 


21 Nov 2011
Comments: 0

Surprisingly Educational Apps: Part 2 – Episode 12

This is a supplement to “Appy Hours 4 You” Blog Talk Radio Show: Episode 12 – “Surprisingly Educational Apps. In this episode we featured multiple edutainment apps that that at first glance might not appear educational. For each free app we shared multiple integration ideas across content areas and grade levels. Check out our first installment of “Surprisingly Educational Apps.”

 

PicCal Calendar Event

This week we discussed the following free apps:

  1. StoryLines: Check out other apps by Root-1
  2. ArounderTouch: Check out edu tips for Virtual Vacations
  3. Tour Wrist: Visit their blog to see more media coverage and consumer reviews
  4. PicCal Lite (Blog)
  5. My Playhome Lite: More edu tips for integration
  6. To me By me (Website)
  7. SonicPics Lite (Website)
  8. Bill Atkinson PhotoCard Lite (Website)
  9. Coolibah (Website)

 
Wish I had come across Michael Benavides’ Spanish iLesson using TurboCollage (I am adding this app as a “write-in” on the surprisingly educational app ballot).

 

Stream this week’s episode or download it in iTunes directly.

Listen to internet radio with Techchef4u on Blog Talk Radio

 


18 Nov 2011
Comments: 0

History Rocks with Web 2.0 Tools & iDevices

A few weeks ago Jennifer Hall of Krueger Middle School asked me to review her music video project and give her a few tools that her students could use to execute the assignment. She had found some pre-created sample videos on YouTube to inspire her students (see below).

 

Too Late to Apologize: A Declaration

 

The assignment is as follows:
  1. Students select a historical period or event (between Pre-Colombian and 1890).
  2. Students research the event and locate 10 artifacts of historical information (e.g. visual, text, audio) to support the selection
  3. Students create a music video to showcase the artifacts and retell the event.
    1. Videos are 30 seconds to 2-3 minutes
    2. Videos could be animated, live action, or a series of stills
    3. The music could be original music and lyrics (both created by students), existing music with original lyrics (lyrics rewritten by students), or existing music that fits the project without alterations

 

Here are some of the tools (apps, software, and Web 2.0) that I suggested be used to achieve the final product:
  1. Software: PhotoStory
  2. Web 2.0: Animoto
  3. Apps: Videolicious, Cartoonatic, Sonic Pics, Slideshow+, StoryRobe . I also came across Film Genie & Roxio PhotoShow after we met.

 

Check out other iPad Lessons for History: Sock Puppet Court Cases Part 1 & Part 2

 

Get inspired to rock out your History classroom (History for Music Lovers – YouTube)

 

The French Revolution (“Bad Romance” by Lady Gaga)
The Gettysburg Address
The Battles at Lexington and Concord in Lego
Ballad of Benjamin Franklin *Music Video*

Why Study History?

18 Nov 2011
Comments: 2

Primarily iProbability

If you are looking for an elementary iPad lesson in the techchef4u kitchen, it was probably cooked up by the ingenious Chef Carnazzo. This probability iLesson is no different. Carnazzo and her second grade class used the app ScreenChomp (featured in “Screen-casting & Problem-solving 4 the Classroom“) as a culminating apptivity from a week of work on probability (e.g. “TEKS 2.11: Probability and statistics. (C) use data to describe events as more likely or less likely such as drawing a certain color crayon from a bag of seven red crayons and three green crayons.”)


Chef Carnazzo Cooks up iProbability

 

Here’s how she did it:

  1. Teacher Preparation: Ms. Carnazzo chose the background pics (clipart from MS Word) and imported them to Doodle Buddy.
  2. Student Choice: Students chose stickers in Doodle Buddy.
  3. Student Assessment: Students had to answer (in written form) teacher pre-generated questions in reference to their picture.
  4. Highly Engaging: Carnazzo originally created the apptivity for an intervention group and, of course, the rest of the class wanted to do the apptivity as well.
  5. Small Group: While Ms. Carnazzo was working with small groups to record their screen-cast, the rest of the class had completed independent practice assignments at their desk.
  6. Student Planning & Preparation: Students used the questions and their answers on the worksheet that Ms. Carnazzo had prepared to craft the narration for their screencast. Carnazzo found it was useful to do a couple of dry runs prior to hitting the record button.
  7. Student Reactions: Students loved the ScreenChomp final project. Carnazzo stated the students really liked the part where their drawings appeared on the screen in the final product.
  8. Other Applications: Carnazzo felt this tool had a lot of klout in the classroom as students do so much problem-solving in math. She plans on using it in the future to have students record and compare different solution strategies to a single problem.

 

Sample other iCreations from the Carnazzo Kitchen: Grammar & Literacy with Tacky Wales, short vowel sounds with Songify, Math fact families with Talking Tom and friends, classifying motion with iCardSort, integrating Math and literacy using Puppet Pals Director’s Pass

 


14 Nov 2011
Comments: 1

HOT Apps 4 Literacy: Episode 10

This is a supplement to “Appy Hours 4 You” Blog Talk Radio Show: Episode 10 – “HOT Apps 4 Literacy“. In this episode we featured multiple game-like apps that supported English Language Arts content for both elementary and secondary students. Our focus was on how these game apps could be used to create purposeful instructional apptivities (e.g. what a task card and recording sheet might look like and what examples of extensions and follow-up apptivities would be.)

This week we discussed the following free apps:

HOT Apps 4 Literacy

Elementary:

    1. Bluster!
    2. Chicktionary Lite
    3. Futaba Word Games for Kids
    4. Word-Blocks
    5. Grammer Jammers
    6. Grammar Fun Free
    7. Story Wheel
    8. Grammar Dragon
    9. K12 Timed Reading Practice Lite

 

Secondary

    1. Same Meaning Magic (Synonyms)
    2. Word Bubble Free
    3. Vocabulary Bubble Free
    4. Poetry Magnets
    5. iAssociate 2 HD Lite

 

iModel with Explain Everything: I have used Explain Everything to model how an iLesson using Chicktionary Lite (or any ELA game app) could be delivered utilizing resources such as task cards, recording sheets, and follow-up activities. (Check out Laura Moore’s task card (Apptivity-Task-Card_Chicktionary) and recording sheet (Student-Recording-Sheet_Chicktionary) on her blog).

 

 

Stream this week’s episode or download it in iTunes directly. 

Listen to internet radio with Techchef4u on Blog Talk Radio

 

Yes, we are now available in iTunes (search for “appy hours 4 u” or “techchef4u”).


08 Nov 2011
Comments: 4

iSequence

In an effort to incorporate the iPads into small group intervention stations for middle school math, I spent a few hours collaborating with Cheryl Mutz, an NEISD district Math Instructional Specialist, to create an apptivity to support the study of sequences in 8th Math. The intervention apptivity would be used in a small group setting (two students to an iPad) and the students would have 30-45 minutes to complete the task.

iSequence: Terms and Rules

 Resources: I have included a iCardSort_Sequences_TaskCard (task card) and  iCardSort_Sequences_Recording Sheet (recording sheet). The recording sheet is intended for students to show work or record answers if teachers choose not to use the email function on the iPad. (If teachers choose to use the email function, students will want to layer each individual sequence problem so all of the cards overlap. This way iCardSort views the cards as a group, or one problem, when it emails the written outline of information above the screenshot.) Check out iCardSort’s public deck repository… This deck is now available for anyone to download and utilize to easily replicate the apptivity.

iModel with Explain Everything: I have used Explain Everything to model how the iLesson could be delivered and the resources that have been provided within the iSequence apptivity.


 
Hungry for more iCardSort apptivities?

  1. iCardSort Lite (website): visit their public repository for pre-created decks and check out their newsletter for integration ideas.
    1. Elementary Science Example
    2. MS Math Example using vocabulary with handouts and lesson
    3. Sorting example for “Words 4 Students”
    4. Getting iN Touch with Vocabulary (using iCardSort and Graphic Organizers)
    5. Videos highlighting basic use and how to integrate in a literature circle