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19 Sep 2012
Comments: 5

MathyCathy

Introducing MathyCathy

Sometimes you just meet someone and you know you are kindred spirits. MathyCathy is that person. She is a middle school mathematics teacher here at Hill Country MS and a fellow lover of pi (true story: my car turned its odometer at 31415 miles and I almost stopped the car to take a pic and freeze that momentous occurrence in time). Like me, she also hails from Pennsylvania and is fairly new to the Eanes school district.

After teaching for 13 years, she is still as enthusiastic and passionate about students and helping them learn as someone who has just entered the field.

Cathy has already begun embracing the 1:1 8th iPad Rollout. Not only has she composed lessons that allow students to have familiarity and exposure with screen-casting, PDF annotation, and QR codes, she has tirelessly chronicled this journey in her blog and created a PDF handout with step-by-step directions for anyone to utilize. Check out all of her other resources on her Teachers Pay Teachers store.

iLesson: The first apptivity she created involves QR codes and 1-Step Equations. Students were given a strip of paper with a QR code and specific directions to scan the code and open the attached PDF and solve the problem using neu.Annotate+ PDF. Student were then prompted to write a story problem to solve another equation. (Each QR code went to 1 of 5 different PDF problems and the same equation for a word problem).

My Suggestion: The final word problem activity could be completed with the QR Code Beamer app as students could write their word problem and then beam it to another student to solve and return.

MathyCathy's iLesson

You will definitely be seeing and hearing more about the energetic and inspiring MathyCathy.

More TechChef4u Math iLessons HERE!

300+ iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

Did you know TechChef4u had a FB page?

 

 


18 Feb 2012
Comments: 2

Tis the Season for iLearning

I have had the pleasure of sharing many of Ms. Carnazzo’s creations in the techchef4u kitchen and thought it was about time I took a trip to her classroom. Yolanda and I had the opportunity to observe Carnazzo in action and assist a group in completing their Seasons project. The weather that day was quite fitting as neither one of us were dressed nor prepared for the torrential downpour.

The first thing I noticed was her classroom management. All students were on task, at a level 0, and were working on the assignment that they were expected to complete. Before the activity, Ms. Carnazzo (2nd grade teacher) reviewed the task and the CHAMP’s Expectations for student behavior. Then students were then split up into 4 groups. One group worked with Ms. Carnazzo on the carpet finalizing their script and storyboard while the others worked quietly at their desks doing independent work. Each group was responsible for a different season.

Carnazzo's iClassroom

 

Science 2.8B: Identify the importance of weather and seasonal information to make choices in clothing, activities and transportation.

Beforehand: Before we arrived, small groups had researched info on their season using BrinpopJr videos and the Science text to describe their seasons citing the following elements:

  1. Typical weather/temperature
  2. Types of clothing to wear
  3. Activities appropriate for that weather
  4. Kinds of transportation they might use (e.g. to get to school)

 
Groups had also discussed and written ideas for their Puppet Pals video using the provided Storyboard template. Ms. Carnazzo had pre-selected a seasonal image background from both Puppet Pals Director’s Pass app and Doodle Buddy’s background gallery.

During Class: Small groups worked with the teacher (and Yolanda and myself) to:

  1. Finalize their Puppet Pals ideas
  2. Practice their presentations without actually recording (took several run-throughs)
  3. Record their video (as time permits)
  4.  

Logistics: Groups not working with a teacher had another weather activity to work on quietly at their desk. In working with a group first-hand I discovered a few things:

  1. You can only practice the script a couple of times before the students start losing interest. I found the best course of action was to practice once or twice with the script, record a rough draft, listen to it, and record one more, and then choose the best of the two.
  2. Passing around the script and the iPad causes a bit of background noise. I found if I held the iPad and handed it to each child when it was their time to speak, some of the noise of moving the iPad was reduced.
  3. The Puppet Pals video file is too large to email. Since the students recorded their show on my device and not Ms. Carnazzo’s, I had one of two options: upload to YouTube as a private file and then download from there, or pull it off when I synced my device at home.

 

Carnazzo's Season's Student Projects


 
If you are interested in how to manage an iClassroom or how to purposefully integrate 1 iPad in to a classroom, tune in Thursday March 1st at 3:30pm as the famous Lisa Carnazzo will be our guest “The 1 iPad Classroom“. If you missed the live show, check it out in iTunes the next day.


17 Feb 2012
Comments: 3

iSpy a Story

Tasked with the initiative to gather student products created from intra-district iPad Lessons, I sent out an email to my campuses that had multiple devices (see below).
 

Letter to My Campuses


 
Within a few minutes, I started receiving emails with student work attachments. Many times I have a specific idea or set of ideas for how an app can be used.
 

Blank Story Spine Template in app

Story Spine Teacher-Created Apptivity: It is always refreshing when I come across innovative and purposeful classroom integration ideas as the ones Ashley Solomon (8th grade ACL & Reading Workshop at Ed White Middle School) shared below using the app Story Spine:
  1. Grade Level: 7th grade
  2. Content Area: Reading Workshop
  3. Topic/Focus/TEKS: The focus was chronological order/sequence of events.
  4. Quick Summary of the Lesson: The book for this week was, “The Transcontinental Railroad.” I had them use the “Story Spine” app to write a story about the transcontinental railroad. I started them out with the first sentence, “Once upon a time many people traveled to California to search for gold.”
  5. Student Task or Product: They were responsible for finishing the story by looking for dates and keywords like, first, last, then, etc in their book. This was an independent activity. The product was their story.
  6. Teacher Notes: I asked them to email it to me and I printed them. I usually have 1 or 2 students volunteer to read their story. For my Reading Workshop kids, an activity like this would take about 30 minutes. So, it can be completed in one day.  I usually don’t print the same day so they won’t get to read their story until the following day.

 

Student Sample of Story Spine Project copied into Notes app


 
What really speaks testaments about this assignment above and beyond the purposeful use of technology and cross-curricular content integration is the fact that the students in her classes have not passed the Reading TAKS. Mrs. Solomon actively integrates the iPads at least three days a week to support and improve student literacy and reading comprehension and will be sharing further lessons over the next few weeks with the techchef4u diners. While she doesn’t believe any of them are “earth shattering”, I would have to disagree as I feel they present lots of app-tastic iPadsibilities. Another thing to note is that student engagement in her classroom is on the rise and paper waste is on the decline.
 
For more iPad Mad-Lib apptivities, check out these.


01 Feb 2012
Comments: 5

Hot Apps 4 HOTS Live in iTunes!

After months of work and preparation, our  “Hot Apps 4 HOTS” ePub is now officially available in the iBookStore for download. This was a self-published effort by myself and Yolanda Barker and we are “oh so appy” and overjoyed to share it with the world. The book includes 9 step-by-step apptivities that focus on each level of Bloom’s (some levels have more than one apptivity). The resource will also serve for our TCEA 2012 workshop by the same name.

Hot Apps 4 HOTS Now Available in iTunes!!!!!!

Please download and share!  If you enjoyed the book…we would greatly appreciate reviews/ratings. =)


28 Jan 2012
Comments: 1

Paperless Passages with PaperPort

Our ELA and ELL teachers were scheduled to conduct a Super Saturday session for ELL students. They had requested that I support them with some apptivities that would focus on unfamiliar vocabulary. The passage (written by Mr. Wayment) was originally included as a handout. I simply converted the document to a PDF, gave it a public URL in Dropbox, and suggested it be completed in an app like Neu.Annotate PDF or PaperPort Notes. Not only does integrating the iPad provide the teachers with an engaging paperless lesson, apps like PaperPort Notes also provide a way for students to provide responses both in written and auditory form. Consider having students answer the following question “Do you think it was right or wrong for the people at the wake to laugh about things that Mr. Ortiz had said and done?” using the voice recording feature.

Annotate your PDF's in PaperPort Notes and include a Voice Message

 

Follow-up activity: This involved students illustrating their own “common words (see page 17 & 18)” vocabulary word from the list. This would include the word, a definition of the word, using the word in a sentence, and a visual representation of the word. The visual could be a picture of the student portraying the word (if the classroom has an iPad 2) or a hand-drawn illustration in an app like Doodle Buddy. Students had the choice of the following words (howl, wail, cry, moan, sob, chuckle, snicker, giggle, guffaw, and explode with laughter). The final product would be assembled in Popplet Lite. An extension could be using Popplet Lite to place each of the words on a spectrum of intensity (e.g. howl to explode with laughter). Also visit Taxonomy of Ideas for a framework. 

Illustrating Vocabulary with Popplet Lite

 

Check out other iLessons and iResources with Neu.Annotate PDF and Popplet Lite.


25 Jan 2012
Comments: 1

Add Some iSpice to your Weather Study

This post could not have come at a better time as we are experiencing all matter of wacky weather this week (I actually spent about an hour with a wet vac in my garage at 2 am to remove rising water).

Wunder Map app highlights precipitation

 

Science 2.8 (A): “measure, record, and graph weather information, including temperature, wind conditions, precipitation, and cloud coverage, in order to identify patterns in the data”

Ms. Carnazzo recently posted student weather reports using the Talking Tom & Ben News app. Prior to recording their weather report, students gathered weather data in their journals using personal observations, the internet, and the app WunderMap (also check out online version). Maps in WunderMap include webcam images and data on temperature, wind, and precipitation as well as multiple layers (e.g. precipitation, clouds, animated radar and satellite, and severe weather).

Carnazzo Student Weather Reports

While this is a second grade science apptivity, the idea can also be translated to a secondary classroom.

Science 8.10 (B): “Identify how global patterns of atmospheric movement influence local weather using weather maps that show high and low pressures and fronts”

How do global patterns of atmospheric movement affect our local weather?

 

In this scenario, students would use the internet to acquire weather data and information on pressures and fronts. The students could then use Videolicious app to create a “weather forecast” presentation. Images for Videolicious could be screenshots from apps (the Weather Channel and Wundermap) or the internet, and actual images taken of the weather outside. Students would also be provided with the vocabulary (e.g. front, high pressure, low pressure, air mass, etc…) they must use in their presentation.

USA Today features National Pressure Data

 

Many times these science-based apptivities are conducted in a series of stations. Consider having students use an interactive tool (other than the iPad… dare I say?) to create their own weather report after gathering their data and research from the internet and apps. This could be done prior to creating the weather report.

Consider Multiple Station Activities to Support Weather Study

 

Students could also create weather reports using Little Bird Tales (and screenshots), or Jing, or SMART recording software and a notebook (see weather forecasting interactive lesson).

SMART Weather Reporting Interactive Notebook


17 Jan 2012
Comments: 1

iBuild iPad Lessons: TCEA 2012

In preparation for our “iBuild iPad Lessons” workshop, which will be offered at TCEA 2012, we have created multiple documents and a SlideShare (all documents and presentation materials will be posted here prior to TCEA).

7 iLessons with 7 QR-Coded Questions and much more...

The three-hour Bring Your Own Device workshop will include:

    1. Where to find the best educational apps
    2. Cautionary Apps & Info on Settings/Restrictions
    3. Sample Student Products & a discussion about consumption vs. production and how students submit work
    4. A Review and Analysis of sample iLessons
    5. A Review and Analysis of 20+ free edu apps with provided integration ideas
    6. An iLesson template and time to create an iLesson of their own using the tools/resources provided.

 

Built in to each section will be time to share resources, tips, and reactions and collaborate with colleagues.

 

Below is the presentation (my apologies about formatting discrepancies between Keynote and PPT) utilized in the course.

Documents utilized in the course:

  1. Appy Integraion
  2. Lesson Template
  3. iBuild iPad QR codes

 

Creative Commons License
iBuild iPad Lessons by Lisa Johnson & Yolanda Barker is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.


18 Nov 2011
Comments: 2

Primarily iProbability

If you are looking for an elementary iPad lesson in the techchef4u kitchen, it was probably cooked up by the ingenious Chef Carnazzo. This probability iLesson is no different. Carnazzo and her second grade class used the app ScreenChomp (featured in “Screen-casting & Problem-solving 4 the Classroom“) as a culminating apptivity from a week of work on probability (e.g. “TEKS 2.11: Probability and statistics. (C) use data to describe events as more likely or less likely such as drawing a certain color crayon from a bag of seven red crayons and three green crayons.”)


Chef Carnazzo Cooks up iProbability

 

Here’s how she did it:

  1. Teacher Preparation: Ms. Carnazzo chose the background pics (clipart from MS Word) and imported them to Doodle Buddy.
  2. Student Choice: Students chose stickers in Doodle Buddy.
  3. Student Assessment: Students had to answer (in written form) teacher pre-generated questions in reference to their picture.
  4. Highly Engaging: Carnazzo originally created the apptivity for an intervention group and, of course, the rest of the class wanted to do the apptivity as well.
  5. Small Group: While Ms. Carnazzo was working with small groups to record their screen-cast, the rest of the class had completed independent practice assignments at their desk.
  6. Student Planning & Preparation: Students used the questions and their answers on the worksheet that Ms. Carnazzo had prepared to craft the narration for their screencast. Carnazzo found it was useful to do a couple of dry runs prior to hitting the record button.
  7. Student Reactions: Students loved the ScreenChomp final project. Carnazzo stated the students really liked the part where their drawings appeared on the screen in the final product.
  8. Other Applications: Carnazzo felt this tool had a lot of klout in the classroom as students do so much problem-solving in math. She plans on using it in the future to have students record and compare different solution strategies to a single problem.

 

Sample other iCreations from the Carnazzo Kitchen: Grammar & Literacy with Tacky Wales, short vowel sounds with Songify, Math fact families with Talking Tom and friends, classifying motion with iCardSort, integrating Math and literacy using Puppet Pals Director’s Pass

 


14 Nov 2011
Comments: 0

iModel iPad Lessons with Number Line

In building the “iTools for the 1 iDevice Classroom” workshop, we felt there was a great need for modeling how various game-like apps can be utilized in multiple settings (e.g. cooperative pairs, small groups, stations, whole class). We also felt very strongly that it wasn’t enough to just talk about classroom and curricular uses but to truly model and discuss how task cards and recording sheets would be used and what follow-up and extension activities would look like.

iModel with Explain Everything: I have used Explain Everything to model how an iLesson could be delivered using the resources that have been provided within the Number Line apptivity. (Check out KSAT’s iPAd Curriculum site for Number Line lesson and score sheet).


 
iNewsletters & Extensions: Consider sending home an iNewsletter for Parents so any student with access to an iPod or iPhone at home could utilize the apps at home for remediation or extension. ShowMe and ScreenChomp would be great iPad apps to use to have students create their own word problem or iLesson on fraction, decimal, percent conversion. If students didn’t have access to an iPad, consider using the video recorder to record themselves working out a problem or modeling a unique approach to conversion.

iNewsletters 4 Parents

 

Hungry for more? Check out NEISD’s “iTools 4 the 1 iDevice Classroom” SlideShare workshop as well as HOT Apps 4 Literacy (includes task cards and recording sheet for ELA game-like apps).



14 Nov 2011
Comments: 1

HOT Apps 4 Literacy: Episode 10

This is a supplement to “Appy Hours 4 You” Blog Talk Radio Show: Episode 10 – “HOT Apps 4 Literacy“. In this episode we featured multiple game-like apps that supported English Language Arts content for both elementary and secondary students. Our focus was on how these game apps could be used to create purposeful instructional apptivities (e.g. what a task card and recording sheet might look like and what examples of extensions and follow-up apptivities would be.)

This week we discussed the following free apps:

HOT Apps 4 Literacy

Elementary:

    1. Bluster!
    2. Chicktionary Lite
    3. Futaba Word Games for Kids
    4. Word-Blocks
    5. Grammer Jammers
    6. Grammar Fun Free
    7. Story Wheel
    8. Grammar Dragon
    9. K12 Timed Reading Practice Lite

 

Secondary

    1. Same Meaning Magic (Synonyms)
    2. Word Bubble Free
    3. Vocabulary Bubble Free
    4. Poetry Magnets
    5. iAssociate 2 HD Lite

 

iModel with Explain Everything: I have used Explain Everything to model how an iLesson using Chicktionary Lite (or any ELA game app) could be delivered utilizing resources such as task cards, recording sheets, and follow-up activities. (Check out Laura Moore’s task card (Apptivity-Task-Card_Chicktionary) and recording sheet (Student-Recording-Sheet_Chicktionary) on her blog).

 

 

Stream this week’s episode or download it in iTunes directly. 

Listen to internet radio with Techchef4u on Blog Talk Radio

 

Yes, we are now available in iTunes (search for “appy hours 4 u” or “techchef4u”).