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12 Aug 2013
Comments: 4

Teacher iPad Orientation Toolkit: 6 Tools Every Teacher Should Master

Recently I co-facilitated an iPad 101 workshop for secondary teachers with fellow iVenger colleagues (@mryenca, @classroom_tech, and @fiskeclass). As we are a K-12 1:1 school district, this course was not a “just the basics” course but truly designed to meet the individual needs of each of the learners. After introductions, we asked each attendee what they wanted to learn. While we didn’t plan it, naturally… many of the proposed topics fell into the usual categories: workflow, organization, assessment, etc…

iPad Workshop

… Over the past few weeks, multiple posts and articles have popped up with some stellar resources to prepare teachers of mobile learning with the supplies they need to be successful in the 2013-2014 school year.

A few of my favorites (which are also linked within the Thinglink below) are:

  1. A Practical Guide for Teachers Who Just Got iPads
  2. 9 Starter Tips for Teachers Who Just Got iPads
  3. 15 Things Every Teacher Should Be Able to Do with their iPad (the jailbreaking one is questionable but the other 14 are worth a gander)
  4. 10 Tips for Managing an iPad Classroom
  5. iPad Integration: Phase 1 (which mentions the iTunes U course “Exploring the iPad in Classroom Instruction”)

So in the interest of providing a resource to support those of you embracing a 1:1 or embarking on your own mobile journey, I smashed two of my favorite web tools (easel.ly and thinglink) to assemble a list of 6 apps (but really types of tools) that every teacher in a mobile classroom should master… and a few professional development ideas for each.

Without further ado… I will bid you adieu and unveil the Teacher iPad Orientation Toolkit.

Hover over the image for hidden gems and goodies. 😉

 

Interactive TechChef Thinglink

Check out the new Chic Geek iJewelry line!

1,200+ iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

Contact TechChef4u to schedule Fall and Spring PD and Workshops: lisa.johnson@techchef4u.com

“Student-Created Books in the iClassroom” iTunes U course is now available!!!

26 Nov 2012
Comments: 4

iPad Tips 4 Parents

Most of the time I focus on integration tips and examples for teachers. Today, I decided to change the pace and share some management tips for the device at home. With a 1:1 iPad initiative in full swing, setting boundaries with the iPad at home can become an issue. To support our Eanes parents, we developed a Digital Learning Parent seminar series.

Wifi Password Fridge created with Word Mover iPad app

Wifi Password Fridge created with Word Mover iPad app

 

5 iPad tips for Parents: One of the resources created for this series was 5 iPad Tips for parents created by our very own Tim Yenca (aka @mryenca). The resource thoroughly covers:

  1. Vigilance: suggests homework be completed in a common area and iPad stored and charged in a common area (say goodnight to your iPad)
  2. Accountability: shares how to manage the multi-tasking bar (great video example)
  3. Notifications: discusses how to turn off notifications to manage distractions (Do Not Disturb info)
  4. Guided Access: restricts students to one app (more info here)
  5. Restrictions: restrict access to age-appropriate content and apps (NB has great info on their student device restrictions’ settings).

 

iPad Tips 4 Parents Comic Poster: Inspired by some of the Comic Life tutorials, I decided to create a comic strip version of this info to share with parents. (Also check out Greg Garner’s “Top 10 iPad Management Tips and Tricks”).

iPad Tips 4 Parents by Lisa Johnson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.  Based on a work at http://whs.eanesisd.net/wifi/wifiparents.

iPad Tips 4 Parents

Creative Commons License

iPad Tips 4 Parents by Lisa Johnson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at http://whs.eanesisd.net/wifi/wifiparents.

 

550+  iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

Did you know TechChef4u had a FB page?

Contact TechChef4u: lisa.johnson@techchef4u.com


14 Feb 2012
Comments: 0

Reflections on a 1:1 iPad: It is a Tool, NOT a Toy!

I had the wonderful app-ortunity to make a site visit to Westlake H.S. in Eanes ISD on Wednesday February 1st. When we arrived, various campus and district officials shared some background on the student-centered learning initiative. They focused on multiple benefits of the 1:1 iPad initiative where high school seniors were issued iPads like textbooks at the beginning of the year. In a time where global communication, inquiry-based opportunities, and self-directed learning is how students manage the information revolution, it was refreshing to get to observe an iLearning Utopia.

WIFI Update from Westlake Chaps on Vimeo: Produced by Westlake Film Production – Special Thanks to Carolyn Foote

When asked what they would miss most about their iPad if it was picked up next week, one student replied “I would miss the responsibility – I feel like the school trusts me.”

Student Responsibilities: Allowing students to take the iPads home “blurs the lines” of school and home and provides for a 24/7 information access environment where students can digitally pursue their passion and interest in authentic learning environments and collaborate and problem-solve with others to deepen understanding. With this came an iPad Loan Agreement which included 10 Student Responsibilities (5 of which are highlighted below):

 

  1. My iPad is my responsibility and I will not leave it in unsupervised areas.
  2. I will honor my family’s values when using the iPad.
  3. I will bring the iPad to school every day with a fully-charged battery.
  4. I will treat the iPad appropriately and will report any mechanical or technical issues to the school.
  5. I agree to use the iPad for appropriate, legitimate, and responsible communications.

 

Parent/Guardian Responsibilities: The agreement also included 7 Parent/Guardian Responsibilities (3 of which are highlighted below) which re-stated many of the Student Responsibilities:

  1. I will supervise my son’s/daughter’s use of the iPad at home.
  2. I will discuss our family’s values and expectations regarding the use of the Internet and email at home and will supervise my son’s/daughter’s use of the Internet and email.
  3. I will ensure that my son/daughter reports any mechanical or technical issues to the school.

 

During my visit, I had the pleasure of observing 3 different classrooms and visiting the Juice Bar.

English 3 AP: While the student task and assignment itself was projected in the SMART board, it was very clear when I walked in to this classroom that the learning had been moved from the wall to the hands of the kids. Students were seated in groups of 4 and 5 (each with their own iPad). Each student was clearly on task and engaged and able to utilize all of the resources around them in a productive and purposeful fashion… including their peers. It was also refreshing to see the teacher, Valerie Taylor, modeling the use of creative commons photos as it is so simple now with an iPad to save any internet image to your Photo Roll for use in a project (without attribution).

Valerie Taylor Moves Learning from the Wall to the Hands of the Kids


 
AP Environmental Science: The teacher, Bob Murphy, discussed how he had found an article that very morning that he felt was more pertinent and relevant than what he had initially planned for the day. Typically, teachers can not change their lessons on the fly to accommodate new or current findings as additional copies and labs require time and planning. With the convenience of having a personal mobile device, students accessed the article with their Austin American Statesman app (they also have a podcast series) and then proceeded to engage in a discussion on the topic.

Statistics: The first thing I noticed about this classroom was the multiple learning styles supported with the iPad. While each student was taking notes on the same topic, many used different note-taking apps (the favorite was NoteTaker), a stylus, a keyboard. Even in the same note-taking app, students notes looked quite different. Brad Smith mentioned a couple of benefits of the 1:1 such as the ability to analyze and manipulate large data sets and make graphs and charts quickly. He also discussed the ability for students to keep a record of their homework and assignments (as these electronic items are resident on their device even after they have submitted them via email to their instructor).

(See video below for more teacher tips for integrating the iPad into the iClassroom)

Juice Bar: Our last stop before returning to debrief on our findings and observations was the library which Carolyn Foote has turned into hip and trendy spot to share apps, collaborate, and troubleshoot the devices. The carpet was removed, power strips, cafe tables and chairs were added, idea boards were provided to share apps and resources, and a mentorship program was created to self-support the troubleshooting and mechanics of the devices.

The Juice Bar: Westlake H.S.


I had brought a list of logistical questions to ask students and teachers and will share them with the resulting answers below:
  1. What if you forget your iPad at home? While it clearly states in the student responsibility form that students will bring a fully-charged iPad to school each day, there will be the occasionally day that one will forget. In the event of iAmnesia, students are able to rent one out for the day.
  2. What happens if a student breaks or damages a device? In the past six months, approximately 60 of the 2,000 iPads have been broken or damaged. This amounts to only 3% of the initial load. Students were given the option to purchase optional insurance for their device for a fee of $30. With a 95% acceptance rate, it is clear this was a popular option.
  3. Can students access Facebook? No, this site is blocked by the school Wifi.
  4. Does the device present a distraction? From multiple student interviews, I found the device is a wonderful way to self-manage. Students are aware that they have to complete the assignment regardless and most would rather complete it in class then complete it at home. If students are off-task on the device, teachers have the authority to pick it up and have it returned to the student or parent at the end of the day.
  5. How do teachers interact with students in this “blurred line” atmosphere? Teachers have office hours a few days a week in which they are available to FaceTime with small groups from 6-8pm to discuss assignments – modeling an atmosphere that closely resembles higher education institutions.
  6. What accommodations are made for absent students? Many times a friend will video-tape the lecture or students can FaceTime in directly.
  7. Can’t students cheat with an iPad? Typically assessments are given with an iPad / non iPad section. The iPad section would also allow access to student notes. Many standardized assessments are accessed via a QR code and then completed in Google Forms. (See video below for apps and process used to create and conduct these paperless assessments)
  8. How do students submit work? While Dropbox is an app that easily allows students access to files, multiple teachers mentioned that the organization and maintenance of the utility as well as the ability for students to accidentally delete or move files and folders led them to rely on submitting work almost exclusively via email. So what might that process look like? Students have a school email. Teachers have a Gmail account in which they have set up files and a sorting nomenclature based on the subject line (e.g. Statitsics: Period 2, English AP: Period 3).
  9. Is printing from an iPad an issue? Due to the increase in electronic submissions of work, teachers have begun to consider what truly needs to be printed and what does not. In doing so, they have saved $30,000 in paper alone this semester.
  10. How does the iPad work in conjunction with the existing textbook? The textbook is still used as a resource. However, students don’t always need to lug it around. The beauty of the iPad is that students can take a snapshot of the 2-3 pages they need (whether it be for questions, an article, or vocabulary) or access the online version from the publisher. Eanes is also in the process of setting up an iTunes U channel for the district and investigating iBooksAuthor.
  11. What kind of covers were issued to protect the devices? Initially students were given a Kensington Padfolio-like $30 cover. The campus had assumed the covers would be turned in once students decided to purchase their own trendy covers but found just the opposite trend occurred. Students were able to personalize and customize the device, home screen, and apps itself and had no need or desire to buy trendy cases.
  12. What apps were initially purchased for the students and how were they disseminated? Each student received roughly $40 worth of apps including Pages, Keynote, Numbers, iMovie etc. These apps are considered a consumable cost as the apps are now tied to individual student iTunes accounts when they are redeemed. Casper is used as a storefront to disseminate the apps provided.

 

Eanes Wifi: Taking Copious Notes in the Juice Bar!

 

Paperless Assessments: Bob Murphy models how the iPads can be utilized to manage delivering student assessments and reduce paper waste.

How are Teachers Integrating the iPad into their Life/Classroom and Handling Student Submissions?

Want More? Visit Eanes’ Wifi iPad Pilot Project Blog and the Westlake H.S. page for more videos and resources. Also Check out the “appy hours 4 u” interview with Carl Hooker for more info on the 1:1 iPad Rollout.

 


11 Feb 2012
Comments: 0

Lessons Learned from iPad & iPod for Secondary: TCEA 2012

One of the sessions I was able to attend this week other than the iPlayground(s) was “iPad & iPod for Secondary“.


SlideRocket: http://bit.ly/uOvX12

Road Blocks to an iPad 1:1: They began with the above Xtranormal which was a great ice-breaker and good platform to get everyone thinking about managing road blocks and criticisms of integrating the iPad into the classroom.

The full presentation is up in Sliderocket (including videos).

iPad and iPod Touches in the Secondary Classroom

 

  1. Learner-Centered: Teachers filled out an application to be part of the pilot and integrated the flipped classroom model which morphs the environment from teacher-centered to learner-centered. To support this model, teachers created a calendar on their website that housed the videos and handouts and study guides. If students did not have access to internet at home, teachers could provide the resources on a flash drive as well.
  2. iClassroom Management: The iPads were provided for each student to use while they were at school (they did not leave campus) and all teachers had the password to the iTunes account. The only paid apps resident on the devices were Pages, Keynote, Numbers, and iMovie. Each classroom also had 3 MacBook Pros for student use and 1 Mac for teacher use and to be utilized to purchase further apps for the classroom. A 10 Port Hub was also purchased to make the syncing process quicker. Other relevant tidbits were the access of Facebook and YouTube to all students (this was addressed in their updated AUP) and a Digital Cafe in Edmodo.
  3. The session also shared a few of their favorite apps: Join.Me (screen sharing and collaboration: must install desktop software), Evernote, ScreenChomp, Science 360, Jot! Whiteboard, Side by Side, PDF Notes, Sundry Notes, CloudOn, ShowMe, Popplet Lite, Toontastic, and Word Jewels.

 

Visit these links for more apps for secondary (Science, Math, ELAR, History) and appy integration for all content areas and grade levels.

02 Nov 2011
Comments: 0

Eanes ISD – How do you setup a 1:1 iPad Program?: Episode 8

Individualized Curriculum

This is a supplement to “Appy Hours 4 You” Blog Talk Radio Show: Episode 8Eanes ISD: How do you setup a 1:1 iPad Program.

This was our first episode with an outside of district guest. We were very fortunate and thrilled to have Carl Hooker (@mrhooker), Director of Instructional Technology for Eanes ISD and “a music loving, techno-literate, iEvangelist from the planet Hookertron” to grace our show. He shared Eanes’ 1:1 iPad program timeline and plan for implementation, management, and integration.

 

“You can’t teach people everything they need to know. The best you can do is position them where they can find what they need to know when they need to know it.” Seymour Papert

Carl shared that Seymour’s quote tied in with the “why” of a 1:1… to keep the focus on the students to provide them with an individualized, flexible curriculum.

iCeption: Carl created a mock-umentary movie to explain how the iDevice actually creates more time in your day. While the video is very edutainment oriented, the message is quite clear… the power of the iDevice is mobile learning.


WIFI Timeline: During our show, Carl discussed the timeline for Eanes’ WIFI (Westlake Initiative for Innovation)

Eanes Timeline for WIFI

 

iDevice Student Orientation Video: After choosing a relevant, flexible, adaptable, and game-changing tool that could provide students with 24/7 access to knowledge and collaboration, Carl created an orientation video for students that included acceptable use guidelines, laser etching as a theft deterrent, passcode locks, iPad Dos and Don’ts, info about the genius bar, care and cleaning, getting apps with an iTunes account and acquiring district-purchased apps from self service, and device insurance for loss or damage.

Eanes ISD Blasts off with a 1:1 iPad Initiative

 

Stream this week’s episode or download it in iTunes directly. 

Listen to internet radio with Techchef4u on Blog Talk Radio

 

Yes, we are now available in iTunes (search for “appy hours 4 u” or “techchef4u”).

 


30 Sep 2011
Comments: 2

Setting Student Restrictions on an iDevice

It is vital for teachers and iDevice administrators to set up restrictions in the device prior to putting them in the hands of students. If restrictions are not initiated, students can set up their own code for the restrictions and/or will have access to multiple questionable opportunities. When you set up restrictions, use a four-digit code that can be standardized (e.g. the four digit year the campus opened) but not easily guessed (e.g. 1234 or 0000).

Here are a few suggestions for default restrictions:

Enable Student Restrictions

  1. YouTube: Many times this is blocked already by the proxy.
  2. iTunes: This will block the music on the device. It will also turn off of Ping, a social network for music, automatically.
  3. Turn off Allow Installing & Deleting Apps: This will block students signing into their own iTunes account and restrict them from deleting existed apps teachers have synced to the device.
  4. Accounts: Set this option to “Don’t Allow Changes” so students cannot edit or delete existing accounts (e.g. default student email for sending projects to teachers and the MobileMe account).
  5. Turn off in-app purchase: This will block pop-ups carrying you to the app store to purchase additional features within an app.
  6. Adjust content age limits as appropriate. Consider the following settings:
    1. Music & Podcasts: Clean
    2. Movies: PG
    3. TV Shows: PG
    4. Apps: 12+
  7. Turn off multi-player games: This applies to games in the game center.
  8. Turn off adding friends: This also applies to games in the game center.

 

Teaching teachers to regulate these restrictions is an integral piece in managing these iDevices in the classroom.

 

 

 


26 Sep 2011
Comments: 0

Appy Hours and App Smackdowns

HS Appy Hour: Thank you Carl Hooker, Eanes ISD Director of Instructional Technology (and “iEvangelist from the planet Hookertron”) for sharing your H.S. Appy Hour menu (modeled after the techchef4u menus linked below). Carl added a very cool feature to his menu: open it in iBooks and the app buttons will actually take you to the app store when you can download the app of your choice. I think I will be “borrowing” this feature when I revamp our secondary menus. (Can’t wait for the release of the app smackdown video!). AppyHourMenu9-19-2011_EanesISDpdf

Eanes ISD Appy Hour Menu

Noterize: I fell in love with Noterize (featured in the All Purpose section of the menu) and shared it as part of a my South San ISD iPad Camp. They loved the integration with PDF’s and the multiple classroom implementation possibilities. Stay tuned for an upcoming techchef4u post which will include home-baked recipes for how to integrate PDF’s into your iLesson Toolkit!  

If you devoured the Eanes ISD menu, whet your palette with blod flavor of these appy morsels:

  1. Secondary Math Menu
  2. Secondary Science Menu
  3. Secondary History Menu
  4. Secondary ELAR Menu
  5. Apps for Parents
  6. HOT Apps 4 HOTS
  7. Appy Hours Direct 2 U: Free Delivery

22 Sep 2011
Comments: 0

3 Ways to Manage Student iPads in the Classroom

As the tidal wave of iDevices hit the shores this fall, I felt it was a good time to highlight a few ways to manage these devices with students.
  1. Add a Custom Email Signature: If you have email set up (we have a generic student email on each device that allows outgoing emails and restricts incoming) on the device to submit student work, consider adding a custom signature to your iDevice to discourage/manage rogue emails and inappropriate student use. Giving each device a different traceable signature will make it easier to locate the device that sent an inappropriate email. It is advised that each student uses the same iPad each class (e.g. Johnny is assigned iPad 4 for English Class 3rd period and Janie is assigned iPad 4 for English Class 4th period) to further streamline this process.
    1. Settings
    2. Mail, Contacts, Calendars
    3. Signature
    4. “Sent from Johnson Middle School: tag#****”
  2. Set up MobileMe on your devices to locate and manage stolen or missing iDevices:
    1. Settings
    2. Mail, Contacts, Calendar
    3. Add Account
    4. MobileMe
    5. Enter Apple ID and password
    6. Next to Verify
    7. OK to allow MobileMe to use the Location
    8. Save
    9. Login to me.com on your computer with the Apple ID and password to track devices
    10. From Me.com, you can Display a Message or Play Sound on the missing device (sound will play when device is on or turned back on) as well as Lock or Wipe it.
  3. Add Numbered Backgrounds to your iDevices (find full setup info for iDevices here) to minimize inappropriate student customization and make checking in/out of iDevices smoother:
    1. Launch Safari on the device
    2. Visit http://bit.ly/pgipadwp (you only need to type in bit.ly/pgipadwp
    3. Select the wallpaper you want for that device (you can choose green backgrounds with yellow or blue text and numbers 1-30)
    4. Tap and hold a couple of seconds to save the image
    5. Launch Photo App (sunflower icon)
    6. Select the image you chose in step 3&4
    7. Hit the arrow
    8. Select as Wallpaper
    9. Set it as both lock screen and home screen