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30 Oct 2011
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"Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery"

Last week I received an email from Donita O’Hair of Frisco ISD. She sent me a very sweet note: “Hi Lisa, I love your site and have gotton so many great ideas! Someone sent it to me that got it from a workshop. I hope you don’t mind… I used the teachers idea (Ms. Carnazzo’s original) for the sums of 10 activity and redid it. I just had a 5th grade student recreate an example for me.”
 

Ms. Carnazzo's Sums of 10

Mrs. O’Hair cooked up her version of the “sums of ten” video with a teacher task intro and blended it with iMovie. She also mentioned she shared a few techchef4u sock puppet examples via QR codes. She stated they are just getting started with iPads at Borchardt – they have approximately 60 iPads and 75 iTouches.

I am always pleased to find that teachers and technology specialists are using the resources that I and/or other guest chefs cook up. My main reason for blogging is to provide anyone with a healthy app-etite… a tech cuisine that can be consumed and adapted.

Please note that all resources on the site are copyrighted “©2011. Lisa Johnson. All rights reserved. Permission to reproduce materials for classroom use granted.”

 

While permission to reproduce is granted and attribution is not required, I do appreciate attribution in apptivities that are adapted. Mrs. O’Hair included a statement “adapted from an original techchef4u post” in the video notes of her adaptation of sums of 10.

Mrs. O’Hair has also been so kind to share some of her previous and upcoming apptivities and iLessons from her district. I am truly thrilled to collaborate and see what others cook up. Looking forward to a medley of inspiration, collaboration, and technology integration.

Surprisingly Educational Apps: Check out “Surprisingly Educational Apps” – the show that served as inspiration for how Talking Tom and friends could be used instructionaly. (We are now available in iTunes – search directly for “appy hours 4 u” or “techchef4u”)

 


30 Oct 2011
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There's a Podcast for that…

When planning an upcoming 6th grade ACL unit which focused on creative writing, I was asked if there were any apps for horror or spooky themed stories to tie in with October’s festivities. Not finding anything free or age-appropriate in the app store, my next course of action was to pay a visit to iTunes. If you can’t find an app for a topic, odds are you will always discover a podcast for it…

Sure enough, I found Vintage Horror Radio. The podcast show highlights “radio adaptations of classic stories from horror authors, as well as the performances of horror icons like Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Boris Karloff and others”. Some of the shows were even originally aired on CBS Radio Mystery Theater.

Vintage Horror Radio Podcasts


 
The apptivity could be set up like this:

  1. Place students in different listening stations. Each station would have a different episode (teachers are advised to preview and preselect episodes that are age and content appropriate).
  2. Students could complete a graphic organizer on the episode (see “Getting iN Touch with Vocabulary“, “HOT Apps 4 Brainstorming“, and “Quadfecta of Integration” for examples and tools)
  3. Students could discuss elements of radio theater (e.g. use of sound effects, narration, music & soundtrack, and tone and intonation) – check out “sound effects: the art of noise” and “radio sound effects in audio theater“)
  4. Students would then cast, script, and perform a radio show of their own (on a given topic or story) and record it (this can be achieved with the voice memo app on the iPod, iTalk Recorder on the iPad, Caster Free and Voice Changer Plus on any iDevice, or a tool like Audacity on the web).

 

Here are some resources to get you started:
  1. Putting on an Old Time Radio Show (PBS lesson plan for teachers)
  2. War of the Worlds: a Broadcast Recreation (a lesson for re-creating reader’s theater radio broadcasts)
  3. Audio Broadcasts & Podcasts (Read Write Think lesson on oral storytelling and dramatization)
  4. A Radio Drama Project
  5. Using Audacity for pupil radio dramas with sound effects

 


25 Oct 2011
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Tacky Wales: iTool for Literacy

If you follow my blog, you will know that Ms. Carnazzo has quite the iLesson toolkit (e.g short vowel sounds with Songify, Math fact families with Talking Tom and friends, classifying motion with iCardSort, and integrating Math and literacy using Puppet Pals Director’s Pass) for utilizing one iPad in her elementary classroom.

Tacky Wales Student Products


 
Her latest project utilized the paid app Tacky Wales: Create Your Own Story (thanks to a donation from the app developer for the promo code). In Language Arts, Ms. Carnazzos’ class has been working on parts of speech (mainly nouns and a sprinkling of verbs and adjectives).

Tacky Wales Student Products


 
Ms. Carnazzo’s model for executing this iLesson is well thought out and flawlessly planned:

  1. Setting the Stage: Before tackling the Tacky Wales project, students worked in collaborative groups to generate lists of words that fit into these categories (e.g. nouns, verbs, adjectives) as a reference.
  2. Modeling  & Guided Practice: She did one story with the whole class as an intro.
  3. Preview & Preselect Content: She then gave students a list of appropriate stories (topic and age-appropriate for second graders as some titles may be more adult-oriented) to choose from.
  4. Student Input: They voted and chose a title for their group.
  5. Facilitating  Student Efforts: Donette Sis (an Instructional Technology Coordinator) and Jennifer Heine (an Instructional Technology Specialist) came to the class with their iPads to help work with the small groups in completing their selected story. Teachers helped groups choose and input their words into the story framework.
  6. Extensions & Engagement: After completing and reading/enjoying the original story, students shook the iPad to Spoonerize (note: be aware that some spoonerisms may not be age-appropriate – consider re-shaking if you encounter this issue)…which of course they found quite hilarious!
  7. Presentation & Public Speaking: The next day students shared all their stories with the whole class.
  8. Cross-curricular Integration: Each group illustrated the setting of their own story. The importance of the story element, setting, is an integral focus for Reading.
 

Tacky Wales Student Products


 
Hungry for More?: Check out Words 4 Students for a list of free mad lib-like apps and suggestions for how they can be used in the classroom.

 

Thanks Tacky Wales for featuring  Ms. Carnazzo’s lesson on your site!

 


20 Oct 2011
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37 Books in 1…for Free?

Preparing for a guest blog for Computer Explorers on the topic of “How Can iPads Support Literacy?“, I spent some time looking for a few of my favorite titles of the “I Like…” series in the app store to determine which ones were currently free. And do you know what I found? Not one… but 37 Books in 1 for… free. If I hadn’t been tightly grasping my Starbucks DoubleShot with Energy during my search, the urge to actually jump for joy would not have suppressed.

I Like Books - 37 Picture Books for Kids in 1 AppBy GrasshopperApps.com


 

I have included this literary iPad gem (as well as a list of 11 other free iPad books) and tips to support literacy utilizing the iPad in my debut guest blog for Computer Explorers.

Join Techchef4u in Supporting Literacy on the iPad