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26 Mar 2012
Comments: 14

Integrating Infographics into the iClassroom

So TechChef4U has caught the Infographics Influenza! Being a bit of a Pinterest fanatic, I have found an easy way to support and feed my Infographics Habit. Continuing to stock pile Educational Infographics on my Pinterest board, I waited until I found an app-ortunity to share these resources with one of my teachers and create a delectable lesson. During my stint as an 8th Math tutor, I had a few of the teachers approach me about engaging math lessons that they could utilize with 8th Math after the STAAR test. I mentioned the topic of infographics and shared a few of the ones I had collected. Then I worked with one of the teachers in particular, Mrs. Simpson, to hash out the details.

Pinterest: Educational Infographics

 

Common Core Standards: Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears”

What is an Infographic? Before we continue… let’s define and explore the topic of “infographics” further. No need to recreate the wheel… Kathy Schrock has already blazed the trail and created an amazing Vimeo video on the topic.

8 Great Infographic Stations: Teacher could choose a different infographic (from the list of 120+) for each station or have all of the students use the same infographic for each station. Infographics can be accessed from computers or mobile devices (as most are just images and not flash-based). Note: The EDU Infographic Pinterest board has been curated and reviewed mostly via a mobile phone – please preview and preselect infographics prior to utilizing the resources with your students.

  1. Station 1: List 5-10 Observations or Trends for the Infographic.
    1. This could be accomplished with Todays MeetEdmodo, or Lino It  from a mobile device or computer.
  2. Station 2: Generate 2 Truths & a Lie for the Infographic (prompt parter or other groups to determine which statements are true and which ones are lies).
    1. This could be accomplished with Todays MeetEdmodo, or Lino It  from a mobile device or computer.
    2. Todays Meet (modification): use Todays Meet activity as an exit ticket, print the transcript from Todays Meet, use as a warm-up the next day. Students would choose 4-6 statements and prove/disprove them.
  3. Station 3: Create a Word Problem based on data provided in the infographic (pass your problem to a partner or other group to solve).
    1. Word Problems could be created with a basic voice recording app or apps like Talking Tom & Ben, Puppet Pals, Sock Puppets, QR Code Beamer, Mad Lips, Comic Touch Lite, etc…
    2. Word Problems could be created with Web 2.0 tools like Make Belief Comix and Voki.
  4. Station 4: Answer Specific Questions on the Infographic (teacher could create a task or recording sheet for a specific infographic prior to that day.)
    1. Based on the trend and data given, make predictions or conclusions.
    2. Determine validity of statements.
    3. Teacher could generate multiple True/False Statements (prior to class) and have students prove/disprove them (some could require calculation).
    4. Create a Data table for one of the graphs.
    5. Calculate Central tendency for the data.
    6. Determine what the population of interest is.
    7. Locate bias in the infographic.
  5. Station 5: Determine how the information could be misused by supporting two separate arguments with the same graph, data set, or infographic.
  6. Station 6: Write a story about a person that the population describes or Create a Popplet to illustrate an individual from the population sample (similar to Visual.ly Twitterize).
  7. Station 7: Create a sample poll with questions that could have been asked to generate the infographic given? Then poll actual students in your classroom or at your campus and compare the data (use tools like Poll Everywhere, Edmodo, or  Google Forms – all 3 can be accessed from a mobile device and computer).
  8. Station 8: Determine data and questions for the infographic that you feel should have been included or would benefit the study.
Students Love Technology

Via: OnlineEducation.net

More Info/Resources on Teaching with Infographics 

  1. Kathy Schrock: Infographics as a Creative Assessment
  2. Data Visualizations & Infographics
  3. Project 3 Infographics: Ideas for using infographics across core curriculum.
  4. Data Visualized: More on Teaching with Infographics
  5. Where the Classroom Ends: Great ideas on using infographics to teach explicit/implicit arguments and utilize animated infographics.
  6. 10 Awesome Free Tools to Make Infographics

03 Jun 2011
Comments: 0

Today's Meet

Todays Meet is a Web 2.0 tool that is free, requires no logins, and works off of any iDevice. It allows teachers to instantly create a virtual room for students to speak up. The tool can be used for discussions, brainstorming, preflecting, formative assessment, and even exit tickets. Responses are limited to 140 characters or less (much like Twitter). This type of online response is considered micro-blogging due to the size of the post.

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Other Ideas for Todays Meet:

  • Pop-Up Discussion: Try spicing up an educational video clip by creating a Today’s Meet virtual room via mobile devices. Students could post questions and answers to the film as they go or could even highlight character traits, discover elements of light and dark imagery, discuss misconceptions and vocabulary, analyze quotes, practice Socratic questioning, summarize, or locate Shakespearean references (see Raise the Curtain & Raise the Bar post) – almost like a virtual dialectical notebook. VH1 used to do something similar with Pop-Up Videos and many television shows (the Voice which claims to be the “most digitally integrated show on television”) will run Twitter feeds at the bottom of the screen. Not only is this form of media engaging – it is a great way to track comprehension and to have an ongoing discussion.
  • Evaluate Posts: Todays Meet also allows you to print a transcript of the discussion which is wonderful for counting and evaluating posts. I even had a teacher print it out, black out the names, and use it for a starter the next day. Students were asked to evaluate the spelling and grammar in the posts. What a great extension!

Things to be mindful of:

  • Public Access: Because there are no logins, anyone with the url can access and contribute to the group (which could be good if you wanted to chat with another class in another district, city, around the world, etc… but not so good for other obvious reasons. This is why I typically only leave the room open for two hours.). 
  • Student Info protection: it may be wise to have students use names that are generic or give them a # to avoid having student information made publicly accessible.
  • Inappropriate Comments: There is no way to remove or delete the comment from the feed. This may worry some teachers but I liken it to a student blurting out an inappropriate comment in the classroom. There would be no way to delete this comment from the minds or ears of his/her fellow classmates either. I would handle this incident similarly to how a teacher would handle the student who blurted out in class.
  • Setting Ground Rules: Ground rules should be taught prior to conducting a Todays Meet discussion. Students should be give a purpose for the discussion and instructed to stay on topic, be respectful, and post quality not quantity. If you want your students to raise the discussion level, these guidelines should be set and reiterated prior to initiating the discussion.

Do not let these issues deter you from using the tool in your classroom. Just be vigilant and have a plan in place for tackling these issues if and when they arise. While the site is publicly accessible, I have had no issue with inappropriate use to this date.

Using Todays Meet with an iDevice: using Todays Meet in conjunction with a mobile device virtually eliminates many of the limitation issues of the tool in that the devices can be used in the classroom, lab, or an auditorium, and they provide more of a 1:1 solution. If using Todays Meet on an iDevice, the easiest way to approach this is to create a web clip to the Todays Meet site on each device and then have students launch the web clip and simply type in the name of the room after the url. This way if the room changes every two hours, students aren’t redirected to other rooms and the web clip will work all year in any classroom.

Check out this video from LearnitN5 for a quick tutorial and explanation

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Na_rg6Ok7LM]

Check out some articles which reference how it is used in the classroom:

Interested in Web 2.0 tools for discussion? Check out Edmodo, Edistorm (this one is phenomenal – check out this video), LinoIt (works on iDevices), and Corkboard.me.
Below is a screenshot of the Todays Meet handout for the site and some supporting resources

 

 

Check out some of the responses from our Appy Hour via Today’s Meet!

 

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