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24 May 2013
Comments: 1

Fabulous Fugelstad: App-tastic Artistic Epicocity

Thank heavens for my obsession with Pinterest. Last night I lay awake scouring pins and hit the motherload! I happed upon the Dryden Art weebly page via this pin (seen below). At first I just thought it was an artist showcasing their personal art. Upon further inspection and exploration, I discovered a treasure trove of student examples from this K-5 Art teacher.

Amazing Filtered Art Creations by Tricia Fuglestad

I couldn’t resist – I simply had to blog to highlight a few of my favorites below – but truly you must visit her site:

Enter Art though Puppet Pals 

Students Enter Art using Puppet Pals from Tricia Fuglestad on Vimeo.

Contour Line Drawing with the iPad

Contour Line Drawing Update from Tricia Fuglestad on Vimeo.

Heart Houses for Hurricane Sandy Victims

Give our Heart Houses a Home from Tricia Fuglestad on Vimeo.

Rotoscoping Project on iPads

ROTOSCOPING PROJECT ON IPADS from Tricia Fuglestad on Vimeo.

Flying Fifth Graders

Flying Fifth Graders from Tricia Fuglestad on Vimeo.

Tutorials and Templates… Oh My!: Not only does she showcase student art work… she actually provides tutorials so those of us who lack such ability are able to follow along…

Keynote Animation Tutorial from Tricia Fuglestad on Vimeo.

Audioboo Musical Tutorial

She also offers templates and lessons so we can all achieve app-tistic epicocity too!

Fuglestad’s lesson template for Compare-A-Twist with Picasso and Matisse

Even found a Newsweek Keynote templateshe created. So easy to use. I included my son’s Lincoln art as I will be showcasing some of his inquiry-based work and app-tivities during a BrainPop session at ISTE on June 24th.

TechChef Newsweek using Fuglestad’s Keynote template

 

1 iPad Art iClassroom: And seriously, if these weren’t cool enough, she has a slew of ideas for the 1 iPad Art Room! Want more ideas for the 1 iPad Classroom… visit my recent post showcasing apps and resources.

Ideas for the One iPad Art Room from Tricia Fuglestad on Vimeo.

The dynamic and dazzling Fugelstad  knows her creativity and art apps as she showcases many with products, tutorials, and templates. Two of my favorites were the Bobbleshop and Amaziograph app. Oh, and did I mention that her students took second place in a national contest?

Interactive TechChef4u Thinglink

 

1,050+ iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

Contact TechChef4u to schedule Summer and Fall PD and Workshops: lisa.johnson@techchef4u.com

“Student-Created Books in the iClassroom” iTunes U course is now available!!!

 

 

Come visit me at ISTE 2013!

 


12 Feb 2013
Comments: 2

Greathouse's GREAT Curricular Use of Puppet Pals

Greathouse’s middle school class has done it again (check out their first iLesson using Explain Everything)! Rather than have students read the entire chapter on climate, she created an iJigsaw app-tivity. Students were divided into groups and assigned  a section of the climate chapter to summarize and report on. They were given the freedom to choose how and which app would be best to present the content they were responsible for.

Given the freedom to shine, this group chose Puppet Pals and really did the app and the content justice, if I do say so myself.

Check out Puppet Pals Featured Videos

Can’t get enough of Puppet Pals? Have you seen Puppet Pals 2? Test out the FREE version but I have a feeling you will end up buying the All Access Pass.

Puppet Pals 2: Characters, Props, Soundtracks, Zoomable/Panning Sets and More!

 

Interactive TechChef4u Thinglink

750+ iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

Contact TechChef4u to schedule Spring & Summer PD and Workshops: lisa.johnson@techchef4u.com

iPadpalooza 2013  Registration LIVE!!!

HCMS 2013 Site Visits Now Available!
Ted X Youth Austin 3/30/2012!

“Student-Created Books in the iClassroom” iTunes U course is now available!!!

 


12 Feb 2013
Comments: 4

Greathouse’s GREAT Curricular Use of Puppet Pals

Greathouse’s middle school class has done it again (check out their first iLesson using Explain Everything)! Rather than have students read the entire chapter on climate, she created an iJigsaw app-tivity. Students were divided into groups and assigned  a section of the climate chapter to summarize and report on. They were given the freedom to choose how and which app would be best to present the content they were responsible for.

Given the freedom to shine, this group chose Puppet Pals and really did the app and the content justice, if I do say so myself.

Check out Puppet Pals Featured Videos

Can’t get enough of Puppet Pals? Have you seen Puppet Pals 2? Test out the FREE version but I have a feeling you will end up buying the All Access Pass.

Puppet Pals 2: Characters, Props, Soundtracks, Zoomable/Panning Sets and More!

 

Interactive TechChef4u Thinglink

750+ iPad Lessons Pinned HERE!

Contact TechChef4u to schedule Spring & Summer PD and Workshops: lisa.johnson@techchef4u.com

iPadpalooza 2013  Registration LIVE!!!

HCMS 2013 Site Visits Now Available!
Ted X Youth Austin 3/30/2012!

“Student-Created Books in the iClassroom” iTunes U course is now available!!!

 


20 May 2012
Comments: 0

List.ly: 20+ FREE Product-Based Apps


02 Mar 2012
Comments: 6

The 1 iPad Classroom: Episode 21

This is a supplement to “Appy Hours 4 You” Blog Talk Radio ShowEpisode 21: “The 1 iPad Classroom“. In this episode the famous Lisa Carnazzo (2nd grade elementary teacher and iChef) joined us to discuss her iClassroom. She touched on classroom management, the process of planning an iLesson, what road blocks she has encountered and how she overcame them, and the impact the iPad has had on student learning and engagement. She also highlighted some of her favorite apps and iLessons.

 

Stream this week’s episode or download it in iTunes directly.


Listen to internet radio with Techchef4u on Blog Talk Radio

 

Explore some of Lisa Carnazzo’s iLessons:

  1. Seasons (Science lesson using Puppet Pals)
  2. The Water Cycle (Science lesson using ScreenChomp, Songify, and Talkapella)
  3. Inferencing (Language Arts lesson using Talking Tom’s Love Letters and Popplet Lite)
  4. Weather (Science lesson using WunderMap and Talking Tom & Ben News)
  5. Job Application (Language Arts lesson using VoiceThread)
  6. Probability (Math lesson using Doodle Buddy and ScreenChomp)
  7. Parts of Speech (Language Arts lesson using Tacky Wales Create)
  8. Problem-Solving & Word Problems (Math lesson using Puppet Pals)
  9. Objects in Motion (Science lesson using iCardSort)
  10. Sums of 10 (Math lesson using Talking Tom, Ben, Gina, etc…)
  11. Short Vowels (Language Arts lesson using Songify)

 

Want More iLessons?:

 

Check out Yolanda Barker’s Videolicious Summary of our visit to Carnazzo’s iClassroom.

Visit to Carnazzo’s Class from Yolanda Barker on Vimeo.

 

 

 



20 Feb 2012
Comments: 3

Gratitude & App-reciation

During our TCEA 2012 workshops and seminars, Yolanda Barker and I handed out cards with promo codes on them for the following apps. I would first like to say that we do not endorse apps or products that we do not APP-SOLUTELY LOVE and USE. We would feature and mention the apps regardless of their appy donation(s). That being said, I would like to take a moment and thank the app developers for their gracious donations to our TCEA 2012 participants. I know everyone APP-RECIATED the schwag.

App-reciation Collage created with Turbo Collage app

 

  1. Puppet Pals Directors Pass: This app is a main staple in the techchef4u kitchen and can be utilized to create animated videos to support any content area at any grade level. (See Samples).
  2. To me By me: This “surprisingly educational” app allows users to write a letter to their future self to be delivered on a specific date. The app is perfect to practice letter-writing and goal-setting.
  3. Tacky Wales Create: This app is fantastic to teach parts of speech and creative writing. (See Samples).
  4. iCardSort: This app is a MUST for any classroom. It can be used in multiple settings (e.g. individual, cooperative pairs, small groups, stations, whole group) and has so much functionality (users can customize the background and decks in a variety of ways as well as wirelessly beam/blast decks to other users) and versatility (can be used in multiple content areas and grade levels). (See Samples).
  5. Explain Everything: This is by far the best paid app for screen-casting! You can import documents and presentations from Dropbox and Evernote and then annotate and narrate over them. Explain Everything also offers multiple export options that do not require logins! (See Sample).
  6. La Di Da: Created by the makers of Songify, this app allows users to speak a selection and transform it into a song. Clearly “surprisingly educational“, users can practice foreign language, speeches and soliloquies, and create innovative media to support any content area’s project. (See Samples).
  7. Root-1: Root-1 donated the cool “Begin Your Quest” eco-friendly shopping bags and have created the “surprisingly educational” app, StoryLines for Schools. The app is a modern day telephone game. Users choose a vocabulary word or quote or generate their own, pass the device to another student who must draw a representation of the word/quote, and pass it to yet another student who must decipher what the drawing is. The app can be used to support vocabulary, themes, events, and concepts in multiple content areas. Root-1 also makes a few other wonderfully free and educational apps: Word Joust K-5, Word Joust 6-8, xWords, and Word Kung Fu in beta (coming soon).
  8. Inspiration Diagrams: Inspiration Diagrams donated an iPad cover for each of our 3 workshops. I had the pleasure of being a beta tester for Inspiration Diagrams. The Lite version will be released in March and the full in April. The possibilities for support and integration of the writing process are endless. The current version of the app has 11 templates ranging from Cause and Effect and Book Report to Fiction Reading Notes and Chronology. The app still mimics Inspiration software in the outline and diagram views but boasts new features such as Send to Dropbox and iTunes. I am very eager to see what the final product will look like.
  9. Matt Barker: This is Yolanda Barker’s husband. He graciously donated his CD to our participants. While his music is copyright free and he welcomes those who seek to modify and integrate it into their own projects, I am sure he would love to hear how it is being used in the classroom or other settings (share your thoughts with him). Matt is also the artist behind “appy hours 4 u” intro, outro, and voice over and plays live at a few local hangouts in San Antonio.
  10. Coach’s Eye: This was a late edition to our schwag. Coach’s Eye is from the makers of ScreenChomp and Camtastia and offers countless classroom integration possibilities. The name is a bit misleading as it was originally created for coach’s to instantly review and analyze their player’s videos. The app allows users to record or import video, slow it down, narrate and annotate over it, and even export it! Imagine recording and reviewing a science lab, public speaking event or debate, or even  weather patterns on a field trip.

 

Please give these people and app developers a nice round of APP-LAUSE! Thanks Again!

 


18 Feb 2012
Comments: 2

Tis the Season for iLearning

I have had the pleasure of sharing many of Ms. Carnazzo’s creations in the techchef4u kitchen and thought it was about time I took a trip to her classroom. Yolanda and I had the opportunity to observe Carnazzo in action and assist a group in completing their Seasons project. The weather that day was quite fitting as neither one of us were dressed nor prepared for the torrential downpour.

The first thing I noticed was her classroom management. All students were on task, at a level 0, and were working on the assignment that they were expected to complete. Before the activity, Ms. Carnazzo (2nd grade teacher) reviewed the task and the CHAMP’s Expectations for student behavior. Then students were then split up into 4 groups. One group worked with Ms. Carnazzo on the carpet finalizing their script and storyboard while the others worked quietly at their desks doing independent work. Each group was responsible for a different season.

Carnazzo's iClassroom

 

Science 2.8B: Identify the importance of weather and seasonal information to make choices in clothing, activities and transportation.

Beforehand: Before we arrived, small groups had researched info on their season using BrinpopJr videos and the Science text to describe their seasons citing the following elements:

  1. Typical weather/temperature
  2. Types of clothing to wear
  3. Activities appropriate for that weather
  4. Kinds of transportation they might use (e.g. to get to school)

 
Groups had also discussed and written ideas for their Puppet Pals video using the provided Storyboard template. Ms. Carnazzo had pre-selected a seasonal image background from both Puppet Pals Director’s Pass app and Doodle Buddy’s background gallery.

During Class: Small groups worked with the teacher (and Yolanda and myself) to:

  1. Finalize their Puppet Pals ideas
  2. Practice their presentations without actually recording (took several run-throughs)
  3. Record their video (as time permits)
  4.  

Logistics: Groups not working with a teacher had another weather activity to work on quietly at their desk. In working with a group first-hand I discovered a few things:

  1. You can only practice the script a couple of times before the students start losing interest. I found the best course of action was to practice once or twice with the script, record a rough draft, listen to it, and record one more, and then choose the best of the two.
  2. Passing around the script and the iPad causes a bit of background noise. I found if I held the iPad and handed it to each child when it was their time to speak, some of the noise of moving the iPad was reduced.
  3. The Puppet Pals video file is too large to email. Since the students recorded their show on my device and not Ms. Carnazzo’s, I had one of two options: upload to YouTube as a private file and then download from there, or pull it off when I synced my device at home.

 

Carnazzo's Season's Student Projects


 
If you are interested in how to manage an iClassroom or how to purposefully integrate 1 iPad in to a classroom, tune in Thursday March 1st at 3:30pm as the famous Lisa Carnazzo will be our guest “The 1 iPad Classroom“. If you missed the live show, check it out in iTunes the next day.


04 Jan 2012
Comments: 2

Glogster Learning Stations & iHybrids

Asked to develop a technology-integrated lesson for 5th Math, I naturally leaned to using the iPad. However, the lesson is being developed as a district resource and not every campus has iPads or iPods. Thus, I created a hybrid lesson. Since the elementary math specialists already had a bank of word problems that they had used in a “Words to Symbols” matching activity, we only had to spruce up some of the text and make it applicable or relevant to the apps we planned on using.

Glogster Learning Station: 5th Math - Patterns, Relationships, & Algebraic Thinking

 

The resources:

  1. Word Problem Videos: Each word problem was created with apps (e.g. Talking Pierre, Talking WeeMee, Talking Ben, and Puppet Pals). These videos were then emailed from my iPad and uploaded to Glogster EDU.
  2. Recording Sheet: The recording sheet was created in Word and dropped into my public Dropbox folder which generates a unique URL which will allow anyone to access the document (as there is no feature to upload documents in the free version of Glogster EDU).
  3. Glogster Learning Station: The Glogster Learning Station is great and visually appealing way to house all of your resources for students to access during the learning activity. Within the learning station, I included teacher’s notes, student directions, the word problem videos (and text translation), and a screenshot of the recording sheet that hyperlinks to the actual sheet (available to download), and an extra activity (that could serve as an additional assessment).

 

While this is a teacher-created station, the idea is so simple that students could create their own learning centers or create resources for a classroom learning station (as featured by Ms. Carnazzo’s class). Her class worked in small groups to create content to teach facts about government.

Class Glogster Learning Station: 2nd Grade Government Facts

 

The beauty utilizing Glogster EDU as a learning station (see more Glogster Learning Station resources) is that it frees up the teacher from disseminating directions and materials and it frees up devices in the classroom. Many classrooms only have one iPad (or a handful) and a few computer stations accessible to their students. By using the hybrid model, students can visit the Glogster station and then use other tools to complete an extension or remediation (e.g. two or three groups of students are working at Glogster learning stations, one group may be creating their word problem video or Khan-esque explanation using an iDevice and/or Document camera, and another group could be using the SMART board notebook lesson (or laminated cards) to match word problems with equations). This is also a great idea for differentiated instruction.

How times have changed…I created the following learning station glog (“Don’t Underestimate Yourself”) for middle school mathematics less than two years ago and the video resources took me nearly all day to edit and prepare… on a PC. With the flux of mobile devices and the ease of media production on these devices, I was able to knock out the video resources for the equations glog in less than an hour (and that was only due to the fact that I am a bit of a perfectionist).

Glogster Learning Station: Secondary Geometry & Spatial Reasoning

 


25 Oct 2011
Comments: 0

Government vs. Puppets Part 2

With the great success of Government vs. Puppets Round 1 (an iPad project that involved secondary students creating puppet versions of famous court cases), I received two additional student multi-part video projects that I want to share. If it pleases the court…

Gibbons Vs. Ogden (created with Sock Puppets)




New Jersey vs. T.L.O. (created with Puppet Pals)


Please check out original post for more student samples, tips/suggestions/resources to execute the lesson, and additional classroom integration ideas for Sock Puppets & Puppet Pals.

 

 


17 Oct 2011
Comments: 1

Government vs. Puppets

I had the rare treat to sit in on an AP Government class today at Reagan H.S. (Christi Robinson, ITS for Reagan HS and Bush MS invited me to visit) and observe their court case project share-out. Thanks to Puppet Pals Director’s Pass donation, students were able to use the teacher’s iPad to create their own court case puppet show. Ms. Newton, the AP Government teacher, also allowed them to explore other submission venues (e.g. Sock Puppets app, Myths & Legends Story Creator, and video-taping their own sock puppet productions old-school style.)

When the class of 38 students was polled, we found that 37 of the 38 students had a personal iPod/iPhone/iPad mobile device. As I have seen many puppet products in elementary and middle school, it was a great experience for me to see how the same apps could be used in a high school setting. Worried that some of the students would find it childish or infantile, I was thoroughly thrilled to find out that not only did they love the apps… many of them downloaded the apps to their own devices and worked at home to complete the project.

“Students will understand the structure, functions, and powers of Congress, the legislative process, and its relationship the branch of government.”

Court Cases

The Task was to research a court case (they randomly drew one), storyboard their accounts (used the template in Pages), and create a video product that highlighted all of the specifics below:

  1. Name of Case  (and brief summary)
  2. Date
  3. Court Decision
  4. Constitutionality
  5. Impact

 

Since knowing and understand court cases is such an integral part of STAAR and AP exams, creating these shows is a useful and vital tool for students to learn the case as well as review the case before the test (as the majority of the videos were posted to Youtube by students for easy access). Another way to collect these resources for later review would be to use Videodropper and download the student videos to a class Dropbox that could be shared with all of the students and accessed from student devices.

 

In class, we came across the free Court Case app that provides a list of famous court cases and includes the opinion of the court, case citation, dissent, and syllabus. Wish we had found this app prior to the project. Alas, it will still be a good review before students take the exam.
Without further ado… will everyone rise? The honorable Judge Techchef4u will be highlighting these student-created court cases:
 

Miranda vs. Arizona (created with Sock Puppets)

Greg. vs. Georgia (created with Sock Puppets)


Board vs. Education (created with Puppet Pals)

Gibbons vs. Ogden (created with Sock Puppets)

Roe vs. Wade (created with Puppet Pals)

Suggestions & Strategies: As Christi and I sat in on the projects, we made a few notes on suggestions and strategies to use next semester when this project will be presented again:
  1. utilize the court cases app for research prior to storyboarding
  2. utilize T-Chart app to document and weight pros/cons (in this case arguments for the plaintiff and arguments for the defendant)
  3. set a time limit for the video
  4. consider using Videolicious for other video projects
  5. consider using characters to resemble the traits of real individuals in the case (as seen in Miranda vs. Arizona)
  6. use music to create mood and tone (as some students did)
  7. alter the pitch in some apps for students who have high-picthed
  8. create a common tag(s) in YouTube so that they can search later to review
  9. create a shared Dropbox to house the YouTube videos utilizing Videodropper (make sure you select optimize for iPhone/iPod)
  10. set up videos in stations (rather than present to the class as a whole), and have each student complete two circles of reflections for each case  they viewed. (e.g. how did the verdict of this court case directly affect….)

Original Source: Deeper Reading by Kelly Gallagher

 

Many thanks to Christi Robinson, Ms. Newton, and the students of AP Government at Reagan HS for sharing their projects and their class time with me. It is such a joy to see how technology can be seamlessly integrated to foster learning and support the curriculum.

Want More?. Check out other projects and lesson resources highlighting Sock Puppets & Puppet Pals app(s) as well as a follow-up post to this one which includes more student projects.